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Has anybody ever talk to a Fox rep about why there's not a lock out feature on their 36 inch forks? Other fork makers have it, why not Fox? It'd be a nice feature to have on those long fire road climbs or rides to the trailhead on paved roads. I'm sure some don't need it, but I know there's people out there that would like it.

I tried asking them directly but they never got back so someone on this forum mighthave insight? Maybe someone from marketing at Fox that roams the boards can chime in.

thanks! Happy holidays everyone.
 

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A Fox 36 with a lockout would be much more difficult to produce. the FIT damper is not designed like the open bath damper. If you need to reduce pedal bob, and you have the rc2 fork, just turn up the low speed compression damping. And stop mashing on your pedals, you silly squarepusher.
 

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The premise of a fork like this is retarded. By that, I mean why develop really great dampers like the RC2, then go backwards by making it ineffective with such things as lockouts?

1. The 66 does not have a lockout. No idea what the 55 with its 50 damper types has at this point, but the comparable RC3 does not. ETA does not count as a lockout, as it's a lockdown climb assist with some bit of travel.
2. The Lyrik does not have a lockout, neither does the Totem.
3. The Wotan does not have a lockout. It has a travel adjust as a climbing assist.
4. Manitou doesn't have a lockout.

So in going with this, I don't know why you're saying "others have it". It's not a nice feature on a fork like this and it has actually been addressed, at length, about what are the advantages and disadvantages. First thing, Zoke was guilty with their early TST dampers of enticing the xc guys over to terrible performing, QR equipped long travel forks with such things as the AM1, which had a lockout. Those who actually ride and use their suspension realize that the suspension is not only a device for going down, but can assist going up, and if the problem is that you need a lockout on a fire or paved road, I would have to suggest the problem isn't with the lack of a lockout on your equipment.

Now I'm linking to a previous thread about forks and lockouts, turned debate, and into the realm of technique. If you're interested, it's worth a read instead of a rehash of this topic, which was pretty much put to rest in 2003:
http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=443923&highlight=lockout+jerk_chicken
 

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Even a rigid bike that had geometry suited to long travel would suck ass to pedal any distance while standing in the saddle. If you're climbing fire roads and riding on the road and need a lockout, work on your pedalling form.

It's a mistake to not have a lockout on a talas rc2 though, as that fork has every other freakin gizmo available, it sure would be neat to have one more. It needs remotes for the compression and travel adjust too.
 

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Jerk_Chicken said:
The premise of a fork like this is retarded. By that, I mean why develop really great dampers like the RC2, then go backwards by making it ineffective with such things as lockouts?

1. The 66 does not have a lockout. No idea what the 55 with its 50 damper types has at this point, but the comparable RC3 does not. ETA does not count as a lockout, as it's a lockdown climb assist with some bit of travel.
2. The Lyrik does not have a lockout, neither does the Totem.
3. The Wotan does not have a lockout. It has a travel adjust as a climbing assist.
4. Manitou doesn't have a lockout.

So in going with this, I don't know why you're saying "others have it". It's not a nice feature on a fork like this and it has actually been addressed, at length, about what are the advantages and disadvantages. First thing, Zoke was guilty with their early TST dampers of enticing the xc guys over to terrible performing, QR equipped long travel forks with such things as the AM1, which had a lockout. Those who actually ride and use their suspension realize that the suspension is not only a device for going down, but can assist going up, and if the problem is that you need a lockout on a fire or paved road, I would have to suggest the problem isn't with the lack of a lockout on your equipment.

Now I'm linking to a previous thread about forks and lockouts, turned debate, and into the realm of technique. If you're interested, it's worth a read instead of a rehash of this topic, which was pretty much put to rest in 2003:
http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=443923&highlight=lockout+jerk_chicken
And there folks, is the brutal truth.
:eek: :thumbsup:
 

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Stealth1972 said:
Has anybody ever talk to a Fox rep about why there's not a lock out feature on their 36 inch forks? Other fork makers have it, why not Fox? It'd be a nice feature to have on those long fire road climbs or rides to the trailhead on paved roads. I'm sure some don't need it, but I know there's people out there that would like it.
The only reason that you might want it is for standing climbing; In which case you will probably want to lock out or dampen your rear suspension as well or the exercise is a tad pointless. Doable? Sure. Necessary? Well, I can climb out of the saddle with my 36 TALAS and a coil rear (just not for long distances). If it really a big deal and you just have to stiffen the 36 up for a brutal 5 mile FR climb, bring a shock pump and give it an extra 40PSI. Besides, in 100mm mode a stock 36 doesn't bob that much.

And as others have pointed out, it is actually nice to have active front suspension when doing seated climbs.
 

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Jerk_Chicken said:
The premise of a fork like this is retarded. By that, I mean why develop really great dampers like the RC2, then go backwards by making it ineffective with such things as lockouts?

1. The 66 does not have a lockout. No idea what the 55 with its 50 damper types has at this point, but the comparable RC3 does not. ETA does not count as a lockout, as it's a lockdown climb assist with some bit of travel.
2. The Lyrik does not have a lockout, neither does the Totem.
3. The Wotan does not have a lockout. It has a travel adjust as a climbing assist.
4. Manitou doesn't have a lockout.

So in going with this, I don't know why you're saying "others have it". It's not a nice feature on a fork like this and it has actually been addressed, at length, about what are the advantages and disadvantages. First thing, Zoke was guilty with their early TST dampers of enticing the xc guys over to terrible performing, QR equipped long travel forks with such things as the AM1, which had a lockout. Those who actually ride and use their suspension realize that the suspension is not only a device for going down, but can assist going up, and if the problem is that you need a lockout on a fire or paved road, I would have to suggest the problem isn't with the lack of a lockout on your equipment.

Now I'm linking to a previous thread about forks and lockouts, turned debate, and into the realm of technique. If you're interested, it's worth a read instead of a rehash of this topic, which was pretty much put to rest in 2003:
http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=443923&highlight=lockout+jerk_chicken
Uh actually the Lyrik and Totem have the (mission control) floadgate that can be turned on and off and the blowoff adjusted much like the fox 32 RLC forks so not sure why you say they don't have a lockout cause it can be set pretty firm and on the fly. Also 55 has TST micro which is similar (gold nob to adjust firmness). So yes others do have a method to turn the low speed comp/threshold on and off for flater climbs. The main reason I see fox not having it in their RC2 is cause they built the cart upside down (compared to the others) so their comp circuit is on the bottom and cant be adjusted on the fly.
 

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Jesse Hill said:
Uh actually the Lyrik and Totem have the (mission control) floadgate that can be turned on and off and the blowoff adjusted much like the fox 32 RLC forks so not sure why you say they don't have a lockout cause it can be set pretty firm and on the fly. Also 55 has TST micro which is similar (gold nob to adjust firmness). So yes others do have a method to turn the low speed comp/threshold on and off for flater climbs. The main reason I see fox not having it in their RC2 is cause they built the cart upside down (compared to the others) so their comp circuit is on the bottom and cant be adjusted on the fly.
Your not talking about a firm lockout, your talking about a pedaling platform or a threshold lockout. Those designs suck ass and deserve to be replaced with something like an RC2 cart. Jerk Chicken nailed it. Pedaling platforms are a band aid fix for the lack of a low speed compression control, there is no reason why a fork designed for aggressive descending should have a low speed circuit and a lockout.

Doesn't Fox provide Propedal adjustments on the Talas R forks anyways? You could always get that if you really want a threshold locout. Fox is back asswards in that they don't offer a travel adjust coil fork but they have their damping systems sorted out, thats not what we should be complaining about.
 

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My highline would climb so much better if my 888 WC had a lockout.
 

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I thought I'd like the lockout feature on the larger forks but I've found it to be unnecessary. I recently went from a 36 to a Totem and the fork does a great job at resisting bob while climbing. I actually prefer it with the floodgate off, even on the road, because when you lock it out the fork stays tall. When it's not locked out you get about an inch or so of sag which balances the bike out properly. This is also why I never liked travel adjust forks. To me climbing requires a "comfortable" geometry.
 

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woodyak said:
I thought I'd like the lockout feature on the larger forks but I've found it to be unnecessary. I recently went from a 36 to a Totem and the fork does a great job at resisting bob while climbing. I actually prefer it with the floodgate off, even on the road, because when you lock it out the fork stays tall. When it's not locked out you get about an inch or so of sag which balances the bike out properly. This is also why I never liked travel adjust forks. To me climbing requires a "comfortable" geometry.
if you lock it before your on the bike then yes but if you are on it then lock it it is not going to raise your fork.

to above yes my 888 ATA WC would climb better too :D but then an 888 and a 36 are a bit different in class and losing about 10lbs off my bike would prob help climbing even more.

I was just pointing out that yes indeed other manufacturers do offer a means to firm up the front on the fly without effecting the fork with it off and while I never actually lock mine out it is nice to have a little firmer for some long 6 mile etc. fire road climbs up. I don't really think front end bob saps power though either since it really isnt part of the drive line but it just gives you more support when your dieing up a hill.
 

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I should add too that I have a remote handle bar "poplock" switch which makes turning it on and off a breeze. If I had to reach down or get off the bike to use it I probably wouldn't near as much. It's all about ease of use for this feature IMO.
 

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Im thinking its about time Fox puts the 36es firmly into the hands of the All Mountain and trail riders and produces an all new 180mm travel fork for the Free riders. I have read somewheres that on a new Gary Fisher bike there is a version of a 140 32 with a 3 way Propedal style switch to better mimic the action of the Fox shocks. I think that a feature like this would be great on an All Mountain style fork.
 
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