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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Took my Intense 6.6 to Buller last Thursday and had a ball on the downhill tracks. Bike worked almost flawlessly except for losing the chain a bunch of times off the front chainring - might get a proper chain guide one day.

On Saturday I took it out again to St Andrews and after the Ridge Rd descent the rear end felt seriously wrong - felt like it was swapping and wandering all over the place.

It turned out that the rear shock had blown an internal seal - if you let the "boost valve" pressure down there was a dead spot in the travel - so no rebound or compression damping - which explained the odd feel.

Easy enough so far - it was time to change the oil anyway. So I let the pressure out and dismantled the shock. Take the O-rings to the shop and get a set of new ones plus spares for next time. Easy, they were all standard sizes.

Check the shim stack - largest compression shim is corroded and next largest has wear marks. Ok - that should be easy too, they look like standard 6 mm ID shims...

But no...6.35 mm ID??? Ok, check the web for 6.35 ID shims...nope. Standard are 6, 8, 10... mm - not this 1/4 inch business.

Try Tekin Suspension (authorised Fox Racing service centre) http://www.tekinsuspension.com.au/id1.html. Shims are listed at $4 each on the webpage. So I call...fellow isn't downright unhelpful but it's a case of "No sorry you can't buy them from us, they are only available to authorised Fox Service centres."

So I can't buy a part that retails for $4 and change it whilst I change the oil but if I want it replaced I can send the shock in for a $200 service.

It's obvious why they chose 6.35 mm. So you can't just go out and buy standard shims.

In retrospect I'm surprised the O-rings were standard sizes, but it's probably only because it would have cost too much to make them in proprietary sizes.

There's nothing special about Fox shocks. Pretty standard design. They've gone and renamed the low-speed compression adjuster "ProPedal" and the pressure valve on the piggyback a "Boost Valve" as though they invented the things...NOT. Sure they've added a "bottom-out" adjustment so you can effectively tune the IFP height without pulling the shock apart but that's about it for innovation.

They trade on their name and then bleed you to the tune of $150 to $200 a service which if you're diligent you'll do every year...shock and forks...and to eliminate the competition so they can keep charging whatever they like they make sure spare parts aren't available to anyone other than themselves.

Yeah, familiar story. Why am I surprised? I shouldn't be. You know those Corian benchtops for example? There's a bunch of manufacturers that make similar stuff out there, so you'd think competition would keep the prices down - but it doesn't work like that. Every manufacturer will only supply to authorised fabricators and they are not allowed to onsell it to the public or anyone else - so really there is no competition if they choose and "educate" the fabricators appropriately.

What a load of hooey. Monopolies and pseudo-monopolies, hate 'em.
 

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cowpat said:
Took my Intense 6.6 to Buller last Thursday and had a ball on the downhill tracks. Bike worked almost flawlessly except for losing the chain a bunch of times off the front chainring - might get a proper chain guide one day.

On Saturday I took it out again to St Andrews and after the Ridge Rd descent the rear end felt seriously wrong - felt like it was swapping and wandering all over the place.

It turned out that the rear shock had blown an internal seal - if you let the "boost valve" pressure down there was a dead spot in the travel - so no rebound or compression damping - which explained the odd feel.

Easy enough so far - it was time to change the oil anyway. So I let the pressure out and dismantled the shock. Take the O-rings to the shop and get a set of new ones plus spares for next time. Easy, they were all standard sizes.

Check the shim stack - largest compression shim is corroded and next largest has wear marks. Ok - that should be easy too, they look like standard 6 mm ID shims...

But no...6.35 mm ID??? Ok, check the web for 6.35 ID shims...nope. Standard are 6, 8, 10... mm - not this 1/4 inch business.

Try Tekin Suspension (authorised Fox Racing service centre) http://www.tekinsuspension.com.au/id1.html. Shims are listed at $4 each on the webpage. So I call...fellow isn't downright unhelpful but it's a case of "No sorry you can't buy them from us, they are only available to authorised Fox Service centres."

So I can't buy a part that retails for $4 and change it whilst I change the oil but if I want it replaced I can send the shock in for a $200 service.

It's obvious why they chose 6.35 mm. So you can't just go out and buy standard shims.

In retrospect I'm surprised the O-rings were standard sizes, but it's probably only because it would have cost too much to make them in proprietary sizes.

There's nothing special about Fox shocks. Pretty standard design. They've gone and renamed the low-speed compression adjuster "ProPedal" and the pressure valve on the piggyback a "Boost Valve" as though they invented the things...NOT. Sure they've added a "bottom-out" adjustment so you can effectively tune the IFP height without pulling the shock apart but that's about it for innovation.

They trade on their name and then bleed you to the tune of $150 to $200 a service which if you're diligent you'll do every year...shock and forks...and to eliminate the competition so they can keep charging whatever they like they make sure spare parts aren't available to anyone other than themselves.

Yeah, familiar story. Why am I surprised? I shouldn't be. You know those Corian benchtops for example? There's a bunch of manufacturers that make similar stuff out there, so you'd think competition would keep the prices down - but it doesn't work like that. Every manufacturer will only supply to authorised fabricators and they are not allowed to onsell it to the public or anyone else - so really there is no competition if they choose and "educate" the fabricators appropriately.

What a load of hooey. Monopolies and pseudo-monopolies, hate 'em.
Hope you can get straightened out bud.

And I have to agree with you completely...there are better products out there. Just because Fox is spec'd as a default rear damper on most bikes and a lot of forks from OEM doesn't mean that they are great...it just means that they can rest on their laurels. It also creates a good following, as most of the bikes spec'd with Fox rear suspension never see anything else, and I'd say it is about the same for the forks.
 

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Scott is a tool.
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cowpat said:
Took my Intense 6.6 to Buller last Thursday and had a ball on the downhill tracks. Bike worked almost flawlessly except for losing the chain a bunch of times off the front chainring - might get a proper chain guide one day.

On Saturday I took it out again to St Andrews and after the Ridge Rd descent the rear end felt seriously wrong - felt like it was swapping and wandering all over the place.

It turned out that the rear shock had blown an internal seal - if you let the "boost valve" pressure down there was a dead spot in the travel - so no rebound or compression damping - which explained the odd feel.

Easy enough so far - it was time to change the oil anyway. So I let the pressure out and dismantled the shock. Take the O-rings to the shop and get a set of new ones plus spares for next time. Easy, they were all standard sizes.

Check the shim stack - largest compression shim is corroded and next largest has wear marks. Ok - that should be easy too, they look like standard 6 mm ID shims...

But no...6.35 mm ID??? Ok, check the web for 6.35 ID shims...nope. Standard are 6, 8, 10... mm - not this 1/4 inch business.

Try Tekin Suspension (authorised Fox Racing service centre) http://www.tekinsuspension.com.au/id1.html. Shims are listed at $4 each on the webpage. So I call...fellow isn't downright unhelpful but it's a case of "No sorry you can't buy them from us, they are only available to authorised Fox Service centres."

So I can't buy a part that retails for $4 and change it whilst I change the oil but if I want it replaced I can send the shock in for a $200 service.

It's obvious why they chose 6.35 mm. So you can't just go out and buy standard shims.

In retrospect I'm surprised the O-rings were standard sizes, but it's probably only because it would have cost too much to make them in proprietary sizes.

There's nothing special about Fox shocks. Pretty standard design. They've gone and renamed the low-speed compression adjuster "ProPedal" and the pressure valve on the piggyback a "Boost Valve" as though they invented the things...NOT. Sure they've added a "bottom-out" adjustment so you can effectively tune the IFP height without pulling the shock apart but that's about it for innovation.

They trade on their name and then bleed you to the tune of $150 to $200 a service which if you're diligent you'll do every year...shock and forks...and to eliminate the competition so they can keep charging whatever they like they make sure spare parts aren't available to anyone other than themselves.

Yeah, familiar story. Why am I surprised? I shouldn't be. You know those Corian benchtops for example? There's a bunch of manufacturers that make similar stuff out there, so you'd think competition would keep the prices down - but it doesn't work like that. Every manufacturer will only supply to authorised fabricators and they are not allowed to onsell it to the public or anyone else - so really there is no competition if they choose and "educate" the fabricators appropriately.

What a load of hooey. Monopolies and pseudo-monopolies, hate 'em.
Sorry to hear that Casper, that is really poor form on Fox's front. On the subject of forks, i've never really understood the hype that followed them. Sure they're hunks of junk, but i've always felt that Rockshox have ridden better and then the Fox maintenance has always been the nail in the coffin on top of that.

I have a Float shock and while it has always been sufficient and never really given me a reason to complain, i've always wanted to swap it out for something else, the only thing stopping me is that my shock is a custom size, and Fox stitched that deal up with Giant long ago. Push are bringing out a custom sized Rockshox Monarch this year, so my chance to be rid of all Fox is in the horizon.

I hope you can find a way to sort it out Casper without having to send the shock off.

Grant.
 

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To continue the hate I'm annoyed at how often my Fox seals start leaking.
Hope you find a cheap way out Casper.
 

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Sorry to hear about that Casper. At the same time, you never cease to amaze with your bike knowledge skills - pulling apart shocks?? I haven't even thought of wandering into that territory yet. But then again, the only shock I am in posession of has 52 O-rings - which says "Go Away" pretty clearly.

I've only had to make a suspension choice twice so far. The first time was with Rockshox (Revelation Fork) on the advice of my LBS, who pretty much explained the exact situation you did - if I went with the Talas, then for most sized maintenance/replacement jobs, it's off to Fox. Whereas (I beleive) SRAM encourage user maintenance. Second choice also Rockshox (Lyrik Fork) was based on my experiences with the first.

I also don't understand the hype with Fox. IMO, the discipline of MTB that makes the most use of suspension is DH. The Boxxers are, and have been, present on more winning bikes than Fox - maybe because they have the Air option in the WC variant, or maybe they're simply better, or were around longer - I dunno.

In any case, I think it's vividly clear what you need to do now Casper.
 

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I would try another dealer/service centre...
or get friendly with the LBS - they happily supply me with bits and pieces as they recognise that I like to play with my bike and can maintain it as well as they can (and have more time to play!)
Fox is American - they do still use imperial there...
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks everyone for your comments. I had no idea there was such strong feeling against Fox's service "strategy."

Thanks tegski - on your input I tried the LBS, who normally get any parts for me no hassles, but to no avail. Apparently they can't get Fox parts themselves to do services. I suppose all the bike shops have to send Fox shocks and forks away for service - that can't be the quickest way to get their customer's (i.e. our) bikes ready for the next ride. As for American and imperial - I've emailed a couple of US places: one reply so far - nope, only metric.

Yes cheap way out is to not worry about it. Turn them over the other way. It'll work ok for a while yet; the real problem was a worn O-ring - no biggie. I might order some metric shims and have a go at the hole with a Dremel. It's only 0.35 mm difference.

I've zero intention of spending what amounts to a good part of a new shock to change a $4 part. If that part fails and can't be fixed it's time for a new shock. I expect I'll want to replace this bike in another few years so I only have to make it hang on until then.

N_P, 52 O-rings? Are you serious? I'm not sure there are 52 parts in a standard rear shock. That pull-shock on the Scott must be some sort of engineering marvel.

And to continue the Fox-bashing a la Hud...

The Fox RP that came on Val's new Santa Cruz Juliana failed in a few days when she was riding it at Moab. The O-ring on the air chamber sort-of oozed out, like it was made of black cheese. We managed to finish our trip by carrying a shock pump and keeping it aired up.

Worked OK for a while after replacing the O-rings, then got stuck-down like everyone else's RP eventually seems to. Manual says "dangerous, must send to Fox service department." Yeah right, took about 5 minutes to fix - quite safely - having taken sensible precautions.

Ta. Feel better now. I feel I've learnt my lesson - avoid Fox, and if you can't, expect hassles if anything goes wrong.
 

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cowpat said:
Took my Intense 6.6 to Buller last Thursday and had a ball on the downhill tracks. Bike worked almost flawlessly except for losing the chain a bunch of times off the front chainring - might get a proper chain guide one day.

On Saturday I took it out again to St Andrews and after the Ridge Rd descent the rear end felt seriously wrong - felt like it was swapping and wandering all over the place.

It turned out that the rear shock had blown an internal seal - if you let the "boost valve" pressure down there was a dead spot in the travel - so no rebound or compression damping - which explained the odd feel.

Easy enough so far - it was time to change the oil anyway. So I let the pressure out and dismantled the shock. Take the O-rings to the shop and get a set of new ones plus spares for next time. Easy, they were all standard sizes.

Check the shim stack - largest compression shim is corroded and next largest has wear marks. Ok - that should be easy too, they look like standard 6 mm ID shims...

But no...6.35 mm ID??? Ok, check the web for 6.35 ID shims...nope. Standard are 6, 8, 10... mm - not this 1/4 inch business.

Try Tekin Suspension (authorised Fox Racing service centre) http://www.tekinsuspension.com.au/id1.html. Shims are listed at $4 each on the webpage. So I call...fellow isn't downright unhelpful but it's a case of "No sorry you can't buy them from us, they are only available to authorised Fox Service centres."

So I can't buy a part that retails for $4 and change it whilst I change the oil but if I want it replaced I can send the shock in for a $200 service.

It's obvious why they chose 6.35 mm. So you can't just go out and buy standard shims.

In retrospect I'm surprised the O-rings were standard sizes, but it's probably only because it would have cost too much to make them in proprietary sizes.

There's nothing special about Fox shocks. Pretty standard design. They've gone and renamed the low-speed compression adjuster "ProPedal" and the pressure valve on the piggyback a "Boost Valve" as though they invented the things...NOT. Sure they've added a "bottom-out" adjustment so you can effectively tune the IFP height without pulling the shock apart but that's about it for innovation.

They trade on their name and then bleed you to the tune of $150 to $200 a service which if you're diligent you'll do every year...shock and forks...and to eliminate the competition so they can keep charging whatever they like they make sure spare parts aren't available to anyone other than themselves.

Yeah, familiar story. Why am I surprised? I shouldn't be. You know those Corian benchtops for example? There's a bunch of manufacturers that make similar stuff out there, so you'd think competition would keep the prices down - but it doesn't work like that. Every manufacturer will only supply to authorised fabricators and they are not allowed to onsell it to the public or anyone else - so really there is no competition if they choose and "educate" the fabricators appropriately.

What a load of hooey. Monopolies and pseudo-monopolies, hate 'em.
Apologies for the grave dig, but here's hoping I can point out some of the obvious errors in your conspiracy theory:
1. Quarter inch shims. Seriously? 1/4" is hardly the most uncommon size (for anything) on the face of the planet, if you can't find shims in that size then you're just not looking hard enough. In fact, I'd be surprised if Fox actually manufactured the shims themselves anyway. I would have understood if they'd been 6.4262mm which corresponds to 253/1000" which is quite an uncommon (read: non existent) size, but quarter inch... come on. Yes 6mm and 8mm IDs are more common, no they're not the only sizes on earth.
2. Propedal isn't a standard LSC adjuster that adjusts a needle valve, it's a reverse threaded preload adjuster that reduces preload on a spring that holds open the boost valve (which is a pressure relief valve held closed by oil pressure). Nobody else does this, hence yes it is innovative.
3. Because of the boost valve being held closed by oil pressure (and the spring's opposing force that the Propedal knob adjusts), the adjustable chamber size (bottom out resistance) affects the increase in oil pressure and thus the ending stroke compression damping ramp up. The 5th Element (and Manitou Swinger) shocks did this first with the same goal in mind - adjustable bottom-out resistance. Well in actual fact it was the Curnutt shocks that did the whole progressive/platform damping thing first, but it was the 5th that brought it to the masses.
4. Claiming that Fox "obviously" use quarter inch shims so you can't buy them off the shelf is just silly. You just haven't been looking very hard. http://www.smallparts.com.au/store/item/wp0064000930013c/washersflatcarbonspringsteelprecision/ 6.401mm should work with a 6.35mm nominal ID but you'll have to work out the thickness you need. Otherwise, check out http://www.teknikmotorsport.com/ind...shop.browse&category_id=83&Itemid=93&TreeId=9 and give those guys a call - they have a very wide selection of shims and last time I dealt with them, they did have some stuff I was after that wasn't listed on their website. Their phone staff are very good.

Hope that clears up some of your bitterness towards Fox. I'm not gonna pretend they're perfect or that I agree with everything they and their importers do, but I think you're being a bit unfair there. If you don't want to deal with them in future then fair enough but be aware that none of the other companies (esp the importers in Aus) are actually any better to deal with after-sales anyway (in my experience), most of the time they're either lacking parts, lacking product tech knowledge, or both. Dirt Works (Manitou) are probably the best of the lot in terms of after-sales backup, but in my opinion the Manitou offerings at the moment aren't that great compared to most of their competitors.
 

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Scott is a tool.
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I've dealt with Dirtworks and Monza (Rockshox), and found Dirtworks to be absolutely painful. Slow, expensive, but most annoyingly rude and unhelpful.

Monza on the other hand have always been fast, approachable and an absolute pleasure to deal with on the couple of occasions that i've had to contact them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Socket. said:
Apologies for the grave dig, but here's hoping I can point out some of the obvious errors in your conspiracy theory:
1. Quarter inch shims. Seriously? 1/4" is hardly the most uncommon size (for anything) on the face of the planet, if you can't find shims in that size then you're just not looking hard enough. In fact, I'd be surprised if Fox actually manufactured the shims themselves anyway. I would have understood if they'd been 6.4262mm which corresponds to 253/1000" which is quite an uncommon (read: non existent) size, but quarter inch... come on. Yes 6mm and 8mm IDs are more common, no they're not the only sizes on earth.
2. Propedal isn't a standard LSC adjuster that adjusts a needle valve, it's a reverse threaded preload adjuster that reduces preload on a spring that holds open the boost valve (which is a pressure relief valve held closed by oil pressure). Nobody else does this, hence yes it is innovative.
3. Because of the boost valve being held closed by oil pressure (and the spring's opposing force that the Propedal knob adjusts), the adjustable chamber size (bottom out resistance) affects the increase in oil pressure and thus the ending stroke compression damping ramp up. The 5th Element (and Manitou Swinger) shocks did this first with the same goal in mind - adjustable bottom-out resistance. Well in actual fact it was the Curnutt shocks that did the whole progressive/platform damping thing first, but it was the 5th that brought it to the masses.
4. Claiming that Fox "obviously" use quarter inch shims so you can't buy them off the shelf is just silly. You just haven't been looking very hard. http://www.smallparts.com.au/store/item/wp0064000930013c/washersflatcarbonspringsteelprecision/ 6.401mm should work with a 6.35mm nominal ID but you'll have to work out the thickness you need. Otherwise, check out http://www.teknikmotorsport.com/ind...shop.browse&category_id=83&Itemid=93&TreeId=9 and give those guys a call - they have a very wide selection of shims and last time I dealt with them, they did have some stuff I was after that wasn't listed on their website. Their phone staff are very good.

Hope that clears up some of your bitterness towards Fox. I'm not gonna pretend they're perfect or that I agree with everything they and their importers do, but I think you're being a bit unfair there. If you don't want to deal with them in future then fair enough but be aware that none of the other companies (esp the importers in Aus) are actually any better to deal with after-sales anyway (in my experience), most of the time they're either lacking parts, lacking product tech knowledge, or both. Dirt Works (Manitou) are probably the best of the lot in terms of after-sales backup, but in my opinion the Manitou offerings at the moment aren't that great compared to most of their competitors.
Hi Socket, what causes me bitterness about Fox is pretty obvious I think - they won't sell spare parts to the end user.

That's pretty much it, but I will go on...

I called my LBS and two Fox repair centres and in all cases was told that the parts were available but as I'm not an authorised service agent I cannot buy them. The LBS said they could not even buy the parts themselves for their own repairs. A hunt on the forums showed that buying something as mundane as a seal kit from Fox is also not possible, even in the States. So I would hazard a guess that it's not just an importer thing, it's Fox's policy and an effective one to keep recurring income coming in and to possibly uphold their reputation by preventing unauthorised technicians with "a little knowledge," as it were, from tinkering with the product. Enough said about that I think.

Yeah 1/4" ID suspension shims, good luck. We're talking 0.10 mm thickness (metric by the way) with OD up to 0.90" (22.86 mm). Thanks for the www.smallparts.com.au link but an OD of 9.6296 mm isn't really big enough, and there are no stock sizes that are anywhere near big enough. I'm sure they'll get them made if I ask, but they won't be cheap. As for Teknik, you probably noticed that the available IDs are: 6, 7, 8, 8.2, 10.2, 11.2 mm. Isn't that telling enough that 6.35 mm is an odd size? Teknik have a good reputation and was actually one of the places I originally called asking about 1/4" ID shims - I was told they don't have them, they don't make them, and as they make their own shims they can't get them in. And no I wasn't really being serious about Fox using 1/4" to maintain incompatibility with other manufacturers - but given it is an unusual size for suspension shims I think you can allow me to rant a little. Let's just say they're not making it easy.

So ProPedal and the Boost Valve. Yes I oversimplified my argument and didn't fully pay tribute to Fox, so I will admit that in the DHX models by moving what is effectively the "SPV" valve away from the piston and to the piggyback (as the Boost Valve) they have been able to retain the compression shim stack on the piston and they've also been able to vent it to the atmosphere rather than have to rely on the integrity of the seal between the two SPV cups. These are both good things and should allow better tuning of HSC damping and improve reliability. On the other hand whilst their implementation of a "threshold/platform valve in the compression circuit" should in theory be tunable to have similar characteristics to their competitors' SPV valves in practise the shock I have does not and never did exhibit a noticeable platform, regardless of the pressure in the piggyback or the setting of the dial - not noticeable in the way that it is on their competitors' units anyway. This is in fact what I prefer on this bike, so it is a good thing for me. It's characteristic seems more in line with a simple LSC adjuster, and in fact there are reviews of bikes on the web where the reviewers hold the same opinion of ProPedal.

As far as what I understand was the actual intended and original design purpose of the SPV valve - to ramp up the compression damping with shock travel - yes the Boost Valve does that perfectly well. And you're right, I had missed that the 5th element has a piggyback chamber volume adjuster too, so in this case I gave credit to Fox where it was not due.

For anyone who has read this far bear in mind that I am not a suspension technician, and whilst I have a working knowledge of various suspension designs I am no expert. I may appear to be trying to pass myself off as one by my style or expression - sorry but that is not intended and is most probably a byproduct of being an engineer and attempting to pass myself off as an expert... I am subject to having "a little knowledge" and I will often get the details wrong by more than I expect. Although this should be obvious it could be that someone reading this is a representative of Fox Racing and may wish to sue me for libel if I am seen to pass off and/or misrepresent ill-informed opinion as fact in such a way as to stain the untarnished reputation of their product.

PS: Socket, please rest assured that no disrespect is intended, you're likely to know how the DHX works better than I do, and it's all cool in the end. I wet-sanded the affected shims on 1200-grit paper and rebuilt the stacks with two stages using the extra 0.4" x 0.20 mm shims as crossovers and although not ideal the result is a noticeable improvement. Perhaps next time I'll grind out some 6 mm ID shims to 1/4" or get the rebound bolt milled down to 6 mm and go from there. I was originally only going to change the oil and seals, but there's that thing about tinkering I was talking about...
 

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ilostmypassword said:
Enduro seals will fix that up. The fox ones seem to be made of potato :madman:
Tried them once and they cracked after a few rides. Stiction seemed to be worse as well.
I'm prepared to accept that I may have got a bad pair.
 

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Hud said:
Tried them once and they cracked after a few rides. Stiction seemed to be worse as well.
I'm prepared to accept that I may have got a bad pair.
Crazy :eek: Maybe they had been sitting around the bikeshop for a while getting all nice and brittle? Everyone i know that has them - swear by them.

Saying that- everyone i know with PIKES have had no issues whereas they have been the worst forks that i've owned....life....it's crazy like frogs in a box :D

OT i know- but hows the otway training gone? Next weekend isn't it? Have a good one eh.
 

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Yep next weekend, looking forward to it. Feeling pretty good, I'd like to beat 8 hrs which is what I got last year, I think I can do it.
BTW to take it a little more OT I'm planning on a trip to NZ this autumn, though I've said that before...
 

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Hud said:
Yep next weekend, looking forward to it. Feeling pretty good, I'd like to beat 8 hrs which is what I got last year, I think I can do it.
BTW to take it a little more OT I'm planning on a trip to NZ this autumn, though I've said that before...
sweet. be sure to let me know when you plan to hit CHCH :) where are you heading btw?

with a dry day planned- i'm sure you will beat your last time. enjoy
 

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Im over fox aswell, they really have their head shoved up their own ass about their products, think they are the be it all and end it all, but they are clearly not

I also DONT like the Aussie Fox importer, was not happy with the way they treated my shock when i went in for repair (gouge resi, damaged decals, carelessly thrown in a bag)

And if they think im gonna pay $120 to have $3 worth of seals changed as well as some oil, they can go get F'ed

Hence why i rebuilt my shock myself, and made a guide so that everyone else can do it as well.

Check my signature
 

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Nick_M2R said:
Im over fox aswell, they really have their head shoved up their own ass about their products, think they are the be it all and end it all, but they are clearly not

I also DONT like the Aussie Fox importer, was not happy with the way they treated my shock when i went in for repair (gouge resi, damaged decals, carelessly thrown in a bag)

And if they think im gonna pay $120 to have $3 worth of seals changed as well as some oil, they can go get F'ed

Hence why i rebuilt my shock myself, and made a guide so that everyone else can do it as well.

Check my signature
Funny thing is that the most damage to my forks stanchions are when i take then to the LBS and get them sent for a service. Go figure! Carelessness and stupidity ain't exclusive to fox!
 

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Nick_M2R said:
Hence why i rebuilt my shock myself, and made a guide so that everyone else can do it as well.

Check my signature
Awesome instructions there Nick. I just recently got a Lyrik Solo Air (haven't ridden it yet though) and have wanted to be able to do this sorta stuff myself as I have all the tools and used to rebuild cars when I was a lad, so this is right up my alley.

ILMP said:
Carelessness and stupidity ain't exclusive to fox!
True dat. In fact, for life in general, when it comes to receiving any kind of service, I've found 'careless and stupid' to almost be in the majority. When I find skill and good service, I'm with that person for life (e.g. bike mechanic, car mechanic, osteo, dentist .... even the dude who makes awesome blueberry bagels down the road)
 
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