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hi, i am wondering if someone can give me some feedback on a 2004 fox vanilla R propedal. I know it prevent it from bobbing too much when climbing, and it opens up when going downhill, then what about drops? Say i am doing flat drop from somwhere, how does the valve know when to open when i land since its closed when i pedal to the drop?
 

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It works

jyguy915 said:
hi, i am wondering if someone can give me some feedback on a 2004 fox vanilla R propedal. I know it prevent it from bobbing too much when climbing, and it opens up when going downhill, then what about drops? Say i am doing flat drop from somwhere, how does the valve know when to open when i land since its closed when i pedal to the drop?
I surprized this thread hasnt gotten any hits! Anyways ill give my 2 cents. I have an 05 Coiler with a Fox Vanilla R in rear. It doesnt bobb in the seat at all, and it has managable bobb while out of the seat. If I am on flat ground, or extended climbs it still absorbs too much energy to climb out of the saddle. The only time I get out of the saddle is on decents, technical accents, and when i get stuck in a really high gear. I dont know how it works, but it works though, and thats all i care about. :D
 

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propedal only effect first part of travel

The way propedal works is it makes the first part of the travel stiffer then the rest of the travel. i.e. if you hit a small bump the propedal minimizes the travel, but once you hit a big enough bump to get past the propedal portion of the travel the propedel has no effect.

I have a septune shock on my stumpjumper fsr 120 and there is an adjustment that controls the amount of propedal. i.e. the amount of stiffness on that first part of travel is adjustable.

jyguy915 said:
hi, i am wondering if someone can give me some feedback on a 2004 fox vanilla R propedal. I know it prevent it from bobbing too much when climbing, and it opens up when going downhill, then what about drops? Say i am doing flat drop from somwhere, how does the valve know when to open when i land since its closed when i pedal to the drop?
 

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texas said:
The way propedal works is it makes the first part of the travel stiffer then the rest of the travel. i.e. if you hit a small bump the propedal minimizes the travel, but once you hit a big enough bump to get past the propedal portion of the travel the propedel has no effect.
Nope, the ProPedal is actually higher compression damping throughout the entire range of the shock, not just the first part of travel. The ProPedal charts on the Fox website (under technology) clearly show this. This is why people have complained of harshness with these shock. It will take care of some rider induced movement but at the cost of plushness.

http://www.foxracingshox.com/website/TechnologyDesc.asp?Market=MBike&CategoryId=15&Id=10&count=3

I think they have improved it somewhat for 2005 though. Fox hasn't posted new data to support that though.

Fox has the Float RP3 air shock and DHX coil shock that you can adjust the level of ProPedal platform. The rest of them are preset and can't be changed without factory service or custom modification.
 

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Nope?

First there is also a shock called the Fox Septune which is the shock on my Stumpjumper fsr 120. The shock is new this year and only available on the sj fsr 120 which is probably why you have not heard of it. It has 7 "on the fly propedal settings".

If propedal was an increase in the compression damping throught the entire range then propedal would be equivilent to increasing the presure in the shock(which increases the compresion damping)

If you look at the graphs that you refer to you will notice that slope of the propedal vs non-propedal are similar, the biggest difference is that the propedal curve starts at a nonzero force. This is related to that first part of the shock motion.

On the specialized forum someone suggested an experiment of letting out most of the air from the shock and then experimenting with the various pro-pedal settings. When I do this I can definitely observe that the effects of the pro-pedal are only on the first part of the shocks motion. If you have any shock that has propedal and you let out most of the air you will be able to see that even with almost no air in the shock the first part of the shock motion will still require considerable force to move it, but once you get past the first part of the travel the shock will move easily. If you have an RP3 you can then turn off the propedal and see that the entire range of the shock moves easily.

As for your statement that "this is why people have complained of harshness with these shocks". The reason the shock is stiffer is because of that first part of the travel, not the entire range. i.e. your statement that "it will take care of some rider induced movement but at the cost of plushness" is true and the whole point of propedal, but only applies to the first part of the shocks travel.

Homebrew said:
Nope, the ProPedal is actually higher compression damping throughout the entire range of the shock, not just the first part of travel. The ProPedal charts on the Fox website (under technology) clearly show this. This is why people have complained of harshness with these shock. It will take care of some rider induced movement but at the cost of plushness.

http://www.foxracingshox.com/website/TechnologyDesc.asp?Market=MBike&CategoryId=15&Id=10&count=3

I think they have improved it somewhat for 2005 though. Fox hasn't posted new data to support that though.

Fox has the Float RP3 air shock and DHX coil shock that you can adjust the level of ProPedal platform. The rest of them are preset and can't be changed without factory service or custom modification.
 

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texas said:
First there is also a shock called the Fox Septune which is the shock on my Stumpjumper fsr 120. The shock is new this year and only available on the sj fsr 120 which is probably why you have not heard of it. It has 7 "on the fly propedal settings".

If propedal was an increase in the compression damping throught the entire range then propedal would be equivilent to increasing the presure in the shock(which increases the compresion damping)

If you look at the graphs that you refer to you will notice that slope of the propedal vs non-propedal are similar, the biggest difference is that the propedal curve starts at a nonzero force. This is related to that first part of the shock motion.

On the specialized forum someone suggested an experiment of letting out most of the air from the shock and then experimenting with the various pro-pedal settings. When I do this I can definitely observe that the effects of the pro-pedal are only on the first part of the shocks motion. If you have any shock that has propedal and you let out most of the air you will be able to see that even with almost no air in the shock the first part of the shock motion will still require considerable force to move it, but once you get past the first part of the travel the shock will move easily. If you have an RP3 you can then turn off the propedal and see that the entire range of the shock moves easily.

As for your statement that "this is why people have complained of harshness with these shocks". The reason the shock is stiffer is because of that first part of the travel, not the entire range. i.e. your statement that "it will take care of some rider induced movement but at the cost of plushness" is true and the whole point of propedal, but only applies to the first part of the shocks travel.
Sorry man, but you are not correct. It works on the entire range of travel... not sure where you got your information.

The shock is not on or off as some may think. It basically has a filter that allows the shock to feel normal (non damped) on high frequency movements and then feel stiff on low frequency movements such as your body bouncing up and down with each pedal stroke.
 

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try it yourself.

xl_cheese said:
Sorry man, but you are not correct. It works on the entire range of travel... not sure where you got your information.

The shock is not on or off as some may think. It basically has a filter that allows the shock to feel normal (non damped) on high frequency movements and then feel stiff on low frequency movements such as your body bouncing up and down with each pedal stroke.
There may be more to it then that first part of the travel, but thats the majority of what propedal is.

If you don't believe the graphs or my explination then try the experiment for yourself.
 

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jyguy915 said:
hi, i am wondering if someone can give me some feedback on a 2004 fox vanilla R propedal. I know it prevent it from bobbing too much when climbing, and it opens up when going downhill, then what about drops? Say i am doing flat drop from somwhere, how does the valve know when to open when i land since its closed when i pedal to the drop?
I'm not exactly sure about the technical aspects of propedal but It works really well. I think that because the damping is increased over the entire range, especially at very low velocities, it takes a greater initial force to get the shock moving, therefore preventing bob. According to the damping curves the shock should have a harsher ride given the same spring rate/weight.

I have an '04 Fox vanilla R coil. I can select between 5" or 6" of travel by moving the shock to a different bolt hole. On the 6" setting it doesn't bob hardly at all while seated but has an acceptable amount while standing. The ride is quite plush and soaks up drops really well.

On the 5" setting the ride is more stiff and doesn't bob at all while seated and only slightly while standing.
 
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