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So, here's a simple question, sorry if it has been covered before... What is the difference in the weight between a dhx air 5.0 and the coil version? The weight fox lists on the website list the dhx coil without the coil!
I'm asking because I have an '06 Kona CoilAir (2" stroke shock) with the DHX AIR 5.0 and am think of going to a coil for durability/reliability. The bike is used mostly as a trailbike, but also for shuttle runs/resorts on occasion...
 

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ZEN RIDER!
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Depends on the size of the coil, but I'd guestimate about a pound difference. If you go Ti-coil you'll save anywhere from a 1/2lb to a few grams depending on the size of the coil.

I wouldn't worry too much on static weight, especially for what you ride. Its a trail bike, not an xc racer.
 

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www.derbyrims.com
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A DHX Coil is roughly a little more than 3/4 pound heavier then DHX Air at 2 inch stroke. A DHX with ti spring is about 1/2 pound heavier. You can feel the weight difference when picking up the bike loading onto a bike rack but not when riding.

The bigger difference is constantly progressive linear coil rate vs. very progressive rising rate air rate. I checked out a Coiler before they went to air, pretty firm in the mid range travel. The DHX Air shock may really work better with easier mid range travel compliance without bottoming. Depends on what you want in handling to balance with your fork.

The Coiler likes lots of platform to pedal easily - air is usually better than coil with platform damping, coil feels harsher with platform damping.
 

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Elitest thrill junkie
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derby said:
The bigger difference is linear coil rate vs. very progressive air rate.
That's not very accurate, typically air-shocks have a very linear or flat mid-range. then ramp up excessively right at the end, this of course causing the poor-mid range travel that the DHX air is famous for.
 

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www.derbyrims.com
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Jayem said:
That's not very accurate, typically air-shocks have a very linear or flat mid-range. then ramp up excessively right at the end, this of course causing the poor-mid range travel that the DHX air is famous for.
Air springs are always much less than linear rate in mid stroke, that's why they can feel "flat" (not at all linear) and more compliant through the mid stroke than a linear rate coil of the same total travel use on a bike that is better suited for a linear spring. Coil can be wound to be very progressive and rising in rate too, but progressive rising rate or multi stage coil springs are impossible to find for mountain bikes.

The DHX Air is only poorly matched with bikes having very rising rate shock linkage, and the problem is exaggerated when moderate propedal is needed for decent pedaling quality. When the propedal releases damping on a heavier compression input then the far less than linear mid travel of a rising rate suspension geometry, combined with the rising rate air spring, is much too compliant in mid travel.

The Coiler, having a relatively parallel and near linear rate linkage, using a DHX Air may actually be better balanced with sufficient mid-travel support when using mild to moderate propedal rather than being over damped when combining the same propedal with the DHX Coil as it felt to me when riding one. I'd have to ride the Coiler again but with DHX Air to really know for sure.
 
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