Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner

Which brand is more reliable and therefor more recommendable regarding rear shocks?

1 - 20 of 46 Posts

·
Registered
KTM Ultra 1964 (2021)
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi :)

I know that the following questions may have alread lead to various discussions on many post on page 37 or so, but I would like to gather all possible pieces of information, in order to help future readers of this post too and I hope the community can help.

I'm in the market for a new Endurobike and it is equipped with a FOX Float DPX2 Performance (2021). I tested it and found it quite comfortable personally.

But because I read a lot about components before buying them, I found quite a few comments on YouTube but also here, where people had to service shocks like the X2 (apparently very prone to problems) only after a few rides because they got air in the oil, leaked, made strange noises or other unexpected behaviours, only to experience the same problems shortly after they were serviced by FOX. I also found some problems which concern the DPX2 but less of them (also air in the oil).

Regarding the DPS (on many XC/Trailbikes I guess?) I haven't found much but I could be wrong.

As a result of this I tried to look up, if any significant problems with RockShox dampers are common and couldnt find much, other than the normal number of defects that are expected.

The important questions for me following these insights are:

1. Are FOX dampers really that more prone to failure or known to be quite fragile in comparison to RockShox, so that you need to send them in several times a year (worst case) because some (badly designed?) internals always break? (meaning the marketing is better than the actual product)

2. Is the DPX2 as prone to problems as the X2, in terms of the known issues of the X2, floating around in several forums, or can I buy it without expecting any "chronic headaches" in the near future, because of a bad internal design which makes repairs or warranty claims a necessity, regardless of how often I replace it?

Because I want to get outside and ride and not think about servicing every third ride, because an internal O-Ring or something is broken again.

3. Is there any advantage in choosing a RockShox damper (Super Deluxe, … etc.) in terms of reliability, or are the problems as frequent as with FOX and I simply overlooked it?

I hope I and many others can get insights from buyers and their honest experiences with both RockShox and FOX dampers in the most objective way possible.

Any recommendations are welcome and I'm open for profound discussions about the differences and the tips, all of you can give. :)

If you have any questions, or any kind of information in order to answer certain questions is missing, please feel free to ask.

(P.S: The poll stated below is simply to survey the general preference in the community.)

Have a nice day! And thank you in advance.

Thomas
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
943 Posts
I have the X2. I'm super aggressive and pretty rough on it. No problems whatsoever and it's the best shock I've ever ridden. I've read the complaints, don't know how widespread they are, but can only speak for me that they've been perfectly fine. Same deal with my RS, had no problems with them either, just routine service and maintenance.

While there's a noticable amount of complaints online, I just think about how many people have a Fox shock and don't have any issues. It's the overwhelming majority, so personally I wouldn't worry much about reliability. They're both great shocks. Fox is a bit more customizable if that's your thing, and RS is better known for its relative simplicity and ease of use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
On a serious note, suspension now days is excellent all round when looking at the big manufacturers like fox and rockshox.

The key to keeping things going is regular servicing. Ease of servicing is something I think seperates the two, especially when it comes to the rear shock. I run rockshox on all my bikes and I do all my suspension serving, from the simple 50 hour to the full 200 hour rebuilds. With a few specialist rockshox tools and a bit of practice, this is something I'm competently doing with my Deluxe Select and Deluxe ultimate shocks. I have read the manuals for a number of the Fox shocks and especially when it comes to the full service it looks more challenging and I would be more tempted to send it off to someone else.

The benefit of doing your own service is doing it more often than the manufacturer suggests.

My 2 cents.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
943 Posts
On a serious note, suspension now days is excellent all round when looking at the big manufacturers like fox and rockshox.

The key to keeping things going is regular servicing. Ease of servicing is something I think seperates the two, especially when it comes to the rear shock. I run rockshox on all my bikes and I do all my suspension serving, from the simple 50 hour to the full 200 hour rebuilds. With a few specialist rockshox tools and a bit of practice, this is something I'm competently doing with my Deluxe Select and Deluxe ultimate shocks. I have read the manuals for a number of the Fox shocks and especially when it comes to the full service it looks more challenging and I would be more tempted to send it off to someone else.

The benefit of doing your own service is doing it more often than the manufacturer suggests.

My 2 cents.
All true ... In addition to servicing, Rockshox is a lot more user friendly and simpler to use. I'd bet more than half the people with Fox suspension aren't maximizing their potential. I've had one for 2 months now and I still haven't figured it out yet completely. Rides amazing though!
 

·
Elitest thrill junkie
Joined
·
41,056 Posts
Well, my RS Super Deluxe didn't like me doing a bunch of re-valves, even though this last time I think I was ready to set and forget, the number of times I pried that little c-clip off the reservoir to get at the IFP weakened it and the resevior cap went off like a shotgun shell at the local bike park off of a small jump. The cap and c-clip basically tore through the little lip on the reservoir. I was going to see if I could get another C-clip locally, until I realized the damage on the reservoir and what it did. Anyway, they are still generally reliable shocks...easy to work on, but not very tolerant of the repetitive steps of tuning.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
416 Posts
Rockshox is MUCH more user friendly and requires less special tools to service. I especially prefer the Rockshox method for IFP fill vs. the frankly outdated Fox needle method.

The shocks you are considering are both good and even the DPX2 is quite easy to bleed and service yourself. The X2 is a different story but performance wise probably the best air shock out there ATM.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,548 Posts
Rockshox is MUCH more user friendly and requires less special tools to service. I especially prefer the Rockshox method for IFP fill vs. the frankly outdated Fox needle method.

The shocks you are considering are both good and even the DPX2 is quite easy to bleed and service yourself. The X2 is a different story but performance wise probably the best air shock out there ATM.
I'm curious as to which generation and which tune X2 you think is the best air shock. Also why you think it's the best.
 

·
noMAD man
Joined
·
12,164 Posts
Rockshox is MUCH more user friendly and requires less special tools to service. I especially prefer the Rockshox method for IFP fill vs. the frankly outdated Fox needle method.

The shocks you are considering are both good and even the DPX2 is quite easy to bleed and service yourself. The X2 is a different story but performance wise probably the best air shock out there ATM.
I tend to agree with much of this. RS has generally been easier to fix and/or service...and generally more economical to do so. And RS has tended to be more free with their information and service components available to the end user. Fox has been more likely to discontinue a service component too...the rubber bladder for the first generation Fit dampers as one example. Every suspension manufacturer has their warts and pimples. I'd just give RS the slight preferred nod between the two.

IMO the pinnacle of performance, durability, and simplicity was the generation of Marz forks with full oil bath and coil springs back in the day...basically simple, smaller scale, moto forks. The wailing and gnashing of teeth by the weight weenies ruined most of that, however...LOL!
 

·
MTBR Member since 2001...
Joined
·
331 Posts
When I think back over the last 15 years, I've owned bikes with both brands and have never had an issue. I always sent them out to be serviced so I couldn't say which is better or easier from a maintenance standpoint. I don't think my voting would be accurate. Both have delivered super squishy, reliable, fast fun.

On the other hand, my experience with Fox and dirt bikes goes way back to the mid 70's. I trust both equally.
 

·
Elitest thrill junkie
Joined
·
41,056 Posts
I tend to agree with much of this. RS has generally been easier to fix and/or service...and generally more economical to do so. And RS has tended to be more free with their information and service components available to the end user. Fox has been more likely to discontinue a service component too...the rubber bladder for the first generation Fit dampers as one example. Every suspension manufacturer has their warts and pimples. I'd just give RS the slight preferred nod between the two.

IMO the pinnacle of performance, durability, and simplicity was the generation of Marz forks with full oil bath and coil springs back in the day...basically simple, smaller scale, moto forks. The wailing and gnashing of teeth by the weight weenies ruined most of that, however...LOL!
No doubt. Fox has imperial sized internals and fittings? WTF? How is that even a thing?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,047 Posts
No doubt. Fox has imperial sized internals and fittings?
That is very lame. Especially if they use metric on other products.

For the shocks:
X2 is little of an exception in difficulty to service, but it rides very well. One of the reasons I did not get it is how difficult it is to do anything. If home service is a criteria for you, I would pass.
DPX2 is a different animal altogether and more of a standard shock. Not expecting too many issues there, though I only did air can service, and it was simple. Fox support is great, and they service and upgrade too.

Rockshox products are fine, easy to service, long lasting, no complaints so far having many forks and shocks with many hours. Support is much harder to find, you usually have to go through a shop.

Cane creek I will not touch with a 10 foot pole. Other than being hard to service, hard to find parts, and unreliable you have very few places in the country that will touch them. While service for rockshox and fox is everywhere.

DVO is also fine. Parts are easy to get from their websites and other places, though there was some shortage during the bikepocalypse. Simple and easy to work on, have videos for everything you need. Great support from the company as well. Performance is little overrated, maybe because it's a boutique brand. The company can retune shocks and perform service, which is great.

Old marzocchis with massive oil bath volume, those things were reliable and plush. Can't beat a huge amount of oil. On my ancient air fork the oil level was so high, it was above the seals when the fork was compressed (and probably when it's extended as well). Dry bushings were not an option. Ages and ages on the original seals. When I changed oil after years of neglect it was crystal clear. Good old stuff. But its history, we live in the age of complicated suspension that needs more service.
 

·
Read Only
Joined
·
2,101 Posts
Overall, Fox and Rockshox are far better than the other mainstream brands for reliability and serviceability. Most things come apart nicely with too much loctite, over tightening or delicate tool interfaces. The old float X2 and DHX2 had some annoying flaws that are inexcusable but would be the exception compare to the rest of its products.

The super deluxe has been pretty damn bomb proof to be honest, Rockshox did a really good job with that shock in terms of reliability from my experience.

I would say a good chunk of shock failures are either from janky frames that put excessive load on the shock, or just straight up neglect.

Well, my RS Super Deluxe didn't like me doing a bunch of re-valves, even though this last time I think I was ready to set and forget, the number of times I pried that little c-clip off the reservoir to get at the IFP weakened it and the resevior cap went off like a shotgun shell at the local bike park off of a small jump. The cap and c-clip basically tore through the little lip on the reservoir. I was going to see if I could get another C-clip locally, until I realized the damage on the reservoir and what it did. Anyway, they are still generally reliable shocks...easy to work on, but not very tolerant of the repetitive steps of tuning.
Use a shim, a 0.15mm will slip behind the c-clip and you can flick it out with no damage to the reservoir. Takes a little bit of finesse but you can also slide it behind the clip and use it to protect the alloy while you get the pick under the clip
 
1 - 20 of 46 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top