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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've read a lot of comments saying the Float rides with more progressiveness, and can also be ridden with lower air pressures and thus have greater small bump sensitivity. I looked at Fox's online manual, and both forks carry the same air pressure guidlines, and so from what I understand the air chambers are the same size. The Float has spacers in it (replacing the space where the Talas mechanism would go), so what's causing the Float version to ride differently as so many people are saying.

I want the progressiveness, but also want the travel adjust. All this is making me consider a Lyrik coil u-turn, but it being first year out gives me cold feet [Rockshox is doing great things though as my Pike 454 has been solid]. This new fork would be for a new frame.

Thanks,
-kcav
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
C24C said:
Huh? Where did you hear that? Have you ever seen the inside of a Float fork? There is no spacer inside the air chamber.
I haven't seen the inside...this is where I'm looking for input from those in the know. I just read the online manuals and saw how the travel change on the Float could be done. I was making an assumption that since the air pressure guide for riders is the same for both Float and Talas, that the air chambers were the same size. I further "assumed" that since the air pressure guides in the manual were the same, the Talas mechanism simply took the place of the wquivalent spacers that are in the Float fork. I appear to be misunderstanding something. Maybe the Talas mechanism is mushy in some way as where the Float spacers provide a hard stop that gives it the progressiveness that people talk about. The Float is more progressive yes?
I hope these aren't silly questions...
[edit] PS - here's the link to the Float manual page about changing travel.
http://www.foxracingshox.com/fox_tech_center/owners_manuals/07/eng/2007_om_eng.htm

-kcav
 

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Well, I don't know anything about the design of the forks, but your initial assumption about the recommended pressure relating to air chamber size doesn't hold. Example: You can pump you mtn bike tube to 40 psi. You can also pump your car tire up to 40 psi. Obviously, your car tire holds a lot more air in it.

I can see if the Float has a larger air chamber the reason why it's plusher. as it's compressed, there's a smaller change of surface area in a larger air chamber than a small one, so the coresponding pressure change is lower. Sorry to be a nerd, hope that makes some sense...

Again. I don't really know about the design of the forks. If you want my recommendation, focus on the weight or travel adjustments more, you can always make your fork plusher by decreasing the air pressure.

GL,
-don
 

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Another festivus MIRACLE!
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Interesting, supermechanic Ford at Trailhead really talked up the Fox Float being super plush compared to the Talas.

I'm going to research this more.
 

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noMAD man
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As blehargh stated, increased volume would make it plusher, but then I'd think that might actually cause it to be less progressive overall. Of course other factors like the damper design affect progressiveness also, but I was under the impression that all 3 of the 36 series forks use the same RC2 or R damaper. I've only had my Van 36 internals in hand to actually see the size they displace, but I'd think a Talas system would be the bulkier between a Float and Talas...but I'm just speculating.
 

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DeForest Stump
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bullit71 said:
Interesting, supermechanic Ford at Trailhead really talked up the Fox Float being super plush compared to the Talas.
I have an 06 float and to me it's a little too plush. Bobs alot with every pedal stroke. A touch more initial resistance would help imo. Still like it though and plan to put an 07 rlc on next.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for everyone's replies.
As for the RC2 and R dampers, I heard they were the same in all the 36 forks too, which is why I'm so curious about the different air spring performances.

blehargh said:
Well, I don't know anything about the design of the forks, but your initial assumption about the recommended pressure relating to air chamber size doesn't hold. Example: You can pump you mtn bike tube to 40 psi. You can also pump your car tire up to 40 psi. Obviously, your car tire holds a lot more air in it.
I see what you mean, but if you have the goal of achieving the same amount of sag, then the identical air pressures in different size chambers would produce different results. I think you're right on with the description of how the larger chamber has lower amount of surface area change upon compression, and I'm thinking that if it were true, then to achieve the same about of sag on a Talas and a Float you would need different air pressures if the chambers were different sizes...but the manual has the same air pressure guide. Jeez, maybe that air pressure guide in the manual was copied from Talas to Float out of laziness, and I'm on a goose chase.:madman: Someone out there must be in the know. Speak of great one.

-kcav
 

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Vaginatarian
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what do you mean by progressive?
as the fork compresses, the air chamber gets smaller and the air pressure gets higher, progressively.
if a coil gets compressed unless its progressivey wound it has the same resistance all the way. so an air fork would be more progressive a coil more linear
you may be able to dial in a coil fork to be plusher (without bottoming out, and keeping the sag right by changing the spring rate) but my talas 36rc2 is plenty plush for me.if was any more plush I wouldnt like it, too plush=sloppy prerformance
 

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All 36 models use the same damper. I'm 99% sure on this.

A smaller air volume would cause the fork to be more progressive. The change in pressure as the fork compresses would be more drastic as opposed to a larger volume, so the spring rate would increase at a higher rate-> more progressive. This is kind of how Manitou's bottom out adjuster on their rear shocks works. You change the volume of the SPV chamber, which ramps up the compression (instead of the main spring) as the shock is compressed.

Cobretti- a little more low speed compression would take care of that- or is it an R where compression isn't adjustable?
 

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well I think you are right about the air chambers veing the same because as the rep at fox told me they have the exact same spring rate travel to travel with each other. So why others say the talas is more linear is beyond me, maybe because it says Linear Air Spring in the title instead of float?
 

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DeForest Stump
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Hardtails Are Better said:
or is it an R where compression isn't adjustable?
Yup it's a float r. I plan to swap it out to my back up bike and pick up an rlc. Compared to the duke x/c i had before the float is ultra plush, which is okay but not ideal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Jesse Hill said:
well I think you are right about the air chambers veing the same because as the rep at fox told me they have the exact same spring rate travel to travel with each other. So why others say the talas is more linear is beyond me, maybe because it says Linear Air Spring in the title instead of float?
Right on, there's a vote in my camp.:thumbsup:
Now if I can just get in the real world and ride both back to back.:rolleyes:. I've ridden '06 Talas tuned for a bigger rider, but never touched a float.
 

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Flying in High in the Sky
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Interesting discussion. I would like to know why everyone (one here at least) seems to pefer the float over talas. Are they really that drastically different? Also what does "plush" mean if you guys don't mind me asking?
 
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