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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,
I have a set of Formula the One brakes and seem to have a lot of travel in the brake lever before biting. I have even had a replacement front brake (Leaking) and it still feels the same. I have played about with the lever adjust and fcs with no luck. When the brakes do engage they are great but I wondered if there is anything I can do to reduce lever travel? Can I force more fluid into the system?

Thanks
 

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nature of the beast...

Ones are not without their little quirks, one of which is that the rotor path is very tiny, so if you over fill the system even by a few drops of fluid the rotors run the risk of rubbing on the pads. I find the ergonomics really weird on these brakes longish reach and long throw, coupled with levers that have to run way inboard of the bars makes for some classic goofy Italian ergonimcs. Having said that, once you take the time to set them up on the bars and get used to the feel they really rock. Super smooth and quiet. Kinda hard to believe that so much power can come from such tiny little brakes.

I've had to take the indicators off of my xt pods and run them on the grip side, fcs hard and lever almost all the way in. Still really weird imo but fantastic brakes none the less.
Not a system I'd recommend if you bend rotors.
 

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Bodhisattva
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Janner,
My Ones felt like that too despite a good bleed from above & below.

To make them feel the way I wanted I intentionally overfilled my system just a bit. I removed the rotor from between the pads and during the bleed I pushed fluid through the master until I saw the pistons start to move in just a bit. Be careful, as one time the tubing came off the fitting and DOT went flying (luckily missing my face).

After overfilling, push the pistons & pads back with a clean screwdriver, insert the rotor and squeeze the lever a few times. If you overfilled and can't get rid of the rotor rub then carefully loosen the bleed screw on the caliper and let out a drop or two of DOT. Reset the pads again, squeeze the lever, and repeat as necessary.

My Ones now have a much greater range of adjustability. Via the FCS I can now set my brake to engage with just minimal lever throw or with more lever movement as desired.

I like my brakes to begin engagement with even the smallest of lever movement.
 

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Your frame may need spot facing. I have done my rear but not yet done the fork. The pull on the rear is now less than the front.

I can't fault the feel of the brakes. I have them set up way inboard for one finger braking. I don't consider this a weird setup - I run my Hope Mono Minis the same way on another bike. The lever pull is a bit longer than other brakes to get to the bite point, but the amount of braking on offer at and just beyond the bite point means they give you serious stopping power with none of the worries I have had with lesser brakes about running out of lever travel.
 

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gravity curmudgeon
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Interesting. I picked a pair of the one brakes from larry. I notice the same thing. I have to pull the levers nearly into the bar to get any stopping power. I'm actually somewhat dissappointed.

I'll have to try Squeaky's "fix." I was so hoping for good to go brakes -- the last thing I wanted was another finicky part that requires some one off tweak. Sigh.
 

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cowdog said:
Interesting. I picked a pair of the one brakes from larry. I notice the same thing. I have to pull the levers nearly into the bar to get any stopping power. I'm actually somewhat dissappointed.

I'll have to try Squeaky's "fix." I was so hoping for good to go brakes -- the last thing I wanted was another finicky part that requires some one off tweak. Sigh.
cowdog

I also got a set of Formula ONEs from Larry, I live close to his shop so was able to take my Spot up and have him install. He did a quick bleed on both the front and rear and said that some of the sets that he has seen need this done to them.

They also have the sintered pad material so after a fairly long ride over the weekend they are felling GREAT now with just a one finger pull.

You might want to try this before you do the fluid thing.:thumbsup:
 

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keep riding them

cowdog said:
Interesting. I picked a pair of the one brakes from larry. I notice the same thing. I have to pull the levers nearly into the bar to get any stopping power. I'm actually somewhat dissappointed.

I'll have to try Squeaky's "fix." I was so hoping for good to go brakes -- the last thing I wanted was another finicky part that requires some one off tweak. Sigh.
curiously they take a fairly long time to bed in. I was pretty disappointed with the stopping power for some time. Now however they are more powerfull than my codes, consistently more powerfull.
 

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cowdog said:
I'll have to try Squeaky's "fix." I was so hoping for good to go brakes -- the last thing I wanted was another finicky part that requires some one off tweak. Sigh.
Hold the sighs. The brakes work as designed. If yours are not working, read the manual and set them up as best you can as they are intended. After you have done that consider applying a 'fix' to address a specific problem. You don't need to read many threads on here to understand that these brakes have got some of the best forum feedback. This thread stands out for being about problems with The One that other happy users are not experiencing.
 

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gravity curmudgeon
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But ... but ... these are the holy grail brakes. I'm even hoping they will make me better looking ... :D

Yeah, I plan on sticking with these. The main thing is that I would like to change the lever feel ... or ... maybe I will get used to it. I like the ergonomics of the lever and the modulation. Power is improving.
 

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Bodhisattva
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cowdog said:
But ... but ... these are the holy grail brakes. I'm even hoping they will make me better looking ... :D

Yeah, I plan on sticking with these. The main thing is that I would like to change the lever feel ... or ... maybe I will get used to it. I like the ergonomics of the lever and the modulation. Power is improving.
I agree that these brakes take a bit longer than others to fully bed.

Having said that, I've felt Ventanarama's Ones, which are several months old and well broken in, and his lever engages later than mine after I did the overfill trick to mine.

If you can't get the engagement to feel the way you like then I suggest you invest a few bucks in the Formula bleed kit & a bottle of DOT and try what I did. I'm very, very pleased now.
 

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Hey Guys,
Here are a few notes about some stuff on this thread:

-Sintered pads do have a longer wear in period. They require a really good descent and some heavy breaking before you will fully realize the power. This is even more true with the ONE due to the size of the pads. Remember, THE ONE IS A DH BRAKE!!!....but we see lots of people still using them for XC or AM type riding. If I was a betting man, I would wager my penny on most of you using your ONE's for XC or AM uses. If this is the case, and you don't have some big hills where you ride to break them in...it could take more than just a couple rides to break them in and get full power out of them.

-Lever Contact Point and FCS: This will also change slightly as the brakes move through their break in period. Often times the contact point will move out a bit and the range of adjustability you get from the FCS will increase due to the pads moving in more directly to the rotor. We recommend and design our brakes to have the lever contact relatively close to the bar. This gives you increased control and lessens the likelihood of hand fatigue during long descents. However, if the amount of lever throw is still more than you prefer, in some cases you can change this. DO NOT use the process that Squeeky Wheel described as it creates excessive pressure on the reservoir diaphragm and could potentially cause the diaphragm to distort and fluid bypass into the area behind the diaphragm (basically the front of the bar clamp). You should ALWAYS use very light pressure when actuating the bleeder syringe plungers or risk this problem. Squeeky...you may want to check that you don't have fluid coming out the breather hole on the front side of the bar clamp/reservoir cap.

The correct way to move the lever contact point further out is as follows: 1. Remove your wheel (or the rotor from in between the pads). 2. Squeeze the brake lever fully ONCE. 3. Replace the wheel/rotor. 4 Check if the lever contact point is to your liking. If it is still to far in, repeat the process until it is satisfactory. If after several tries, the point does not seem to be changing, try squeezing the lever blade fully twice during step number 2.

Regarding over filling the system: The only true way to over fill the system is to bleed the brakes with the caliper pistons partially actuated and not fully in the caliper as they should be. This can also occur if you bleed your brakes while the pads are partially worn. It is impossible to overfill the system any other way, because as soon as you remove the bleeder fitting, the excess fluid will purge out. The overfill scenario only comes into play if you replace your worn old pads, with fresh new ones...in which case you will not be able to depress the caliper pistons back in place adequately to avoid getting rubbing.

If anyone has any questions on this, please feel free to give me a call in the office.

Thanks,

Chris Costello
Formula Brake USA
707.765.2770
 

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Bodhisattva
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Formula Brake USA said:
DO NOT use the process that Squeeky Wheel described as it creates excessive pressure on the reservoir diaphragm and could potentially cause the diaphragm to distort and fluid bypass into the area behind the diaphragm (basically the front of the bar clamp). You should ALWAYS use very light pressure when actuating the bleeder syringe plungers or risk this problem. Squeeky...you may want to check that you don't have fluid coming out the breather hole on the front side of the bar clamp/reservoir cap.
I'm good to go. Thanks for the info. Always best to get it from the horse's mouth (so to speak)

Sorry if I caused any confusion out there.....I'm going to repent and flog myself now
 

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Formula Brake USA said:
You should ALWAYS use very light pressure when actuating the bleeder syringe plungers or risk this problem. Squeeky...you may want to check that you don't have fluid coming out the breather hole on the front side of the bar clamp/reservoir cap.
Chris, I might have done this by using heavy pressure w/ the syringe when bleeding. Now the lever squeaks because some of the fluid might have gotten inside the rubber piece of the lever. Any fixes? Otherwise the brakes work fine. Thanks in advance.
 

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The correct way to move the lever contact point further out is as follows: 1. Remove your wheel (or the rotor from in between the pads). 2. Squeeze the brake lever fully ONCE. 3. Replace the wheel/rotor. 4 Check if the lever contact point is to your liking. If it is still to far in, repeat the process until it is satisfactory. If after several tries, the point does not seem to be changing, try squeezing the lever blade fully twice during step number 2.
I've had the same issue. Just tried it, and it works. Thanks Chris!
 

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Cable0guy,
The squeaking would be a different issue. Im not exactly sure what you are talking about "inside the rubber piece of the lever". But if there is some noise occurring when you squeeze the lever blade around where the pushrod goes into the boot which is connected to the FCS, it is probably nothing to worry about and will likely go away on its own. This is often simply caused by air moving around where the boot seals on the pushrod. You could try putting some silicone grease around the pushrod in the grove where the tip of the boot seats and that may get the job done....

Cheers,

Chris
 

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I don't understand one thing in bleeding manual. Point 10 says: pass oil from syringe 1 to syringe 2, 2-3 times...
That is not possible, there is not much oil left in the syringe after point 7. Should I push oil from syringe 2 (syringe that is on pump) to syringe 1, and from syringe 1 back to syrigne2?
 

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Snakes said:
I don't understand one thing in bleeding manual. Point 10 says: pass oil from syringe 1 to syringe 2, 2-3 times...
That is not possible, there is not much oil left in the syringe after point 7. Should I push oil from syringe 2 (syringe that is on pump) to syringe 1, and from syringe 1 back to syrigne2?
Simple answer: Yes.
 

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SS or Die
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Perigeum Development said:
Hey Guys,
Here are a few notes about some stuff on this thread:

-Sintered pads do have a longer wear in period. They require a really good descent and some heavy breaking before you will fully realize the power. This is even more true with the ONE due to the size of the pads. Remember, THE ONE IS A DH BRAKE!!!....but we see lots of people still using them for XC or AM type riding. If I was a betting man, I would wager my penny on most of you using your ONE's for XC or AM uses. If this is the case, and you don't have some big hills where you ride to break them in...it could take more than just a couple rides to break them in and get full power out of them.

-Lever Contact Point and FCS: This will also change slightly as the brakes move through their break in period. Often times the contact point will move out a bit and the range of adjustability you get from the FCS will increase due to the pads moving in more directly to the rotor. We recommend and design our brakes to have the lever contact relatively close to the bar. This gives you increased control and lessens the likelihood of hand fatigue during long descents. However, if the amount of lever throw is still more than you prefer, in some cases you can change this. DO NOT use the process that Squeeky Wheel described as it creates excessive pressure on the reservoir diaphragm and could potentially cause the diaphragm to distort and fluid bypass into the area behind the diaphragm (basically the front of the bar clamp). You should ALWAYS use very light pressure when actuating the bleeder syringe plungers or risk this problem. Squeeky...you may want to check that you don't have fluid coming out the breather hole on the front side of the bar clamp/reservoir cap.

The correct way to move the lever contact point further out is as follows: 1. Remove your wheel (or the rotor from in between the pads). 2. Squeeze the brake lever fully ONCE. 3. Replace the wheel/rotor. 4 Check if the lever contact point is to your liking. If it is still to far in, repeat the process until it is satisfactory. If after several tries, the point does not seem to be changing, try squeezing the lever blade fully twice during step number 2.

Regarding over filling the system: The only true way to over fill the system is to bleed the brakes with the caliper pistons partially actuated and not fully in the caliper as they should be. This can also occur if you bleed your brakes while the pads are partially worn. It is impossible to overfill the system any other way, because as soon as you remove the bleeder fitting, the excess fluid will purge out. The overfill scenario only comes into play if you replace your worn old pads, with fresh new ones...in which case you will not be able to depress the caliper pistons back in place adequately to avoid getting rubbing.

If anyone has any questions on this, please feel free to give me a call in the office.

Thanks,

Chris Costello
Formula Brake USA
707.765.2770
Chris,

Ignore the other post I sent you, I did everything you said on this one and it worked a treat! Thanks a million!

Regards, Muz
 
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