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I have a set of Formula K18's and the problem is that my rear brake is rubbing. The caliper is not centered with the disk so one side is rubbing [ the side closest to the frame".
I need to have "less space" but cannot as I already have no shims on.

Its as if I need to move the caliper closer to the frame but cannot as there is already no shims in place!

Thanks.
 

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These brakes are post mount. No shims needed. Loosen the fixing bolts until the caliper is allowed to move. Pull lever, then tighten incrementally (back and forth in small steps). Release lever, and it should be better off. It also helps to push the pistons apart before you do this and then pull the lever until the pads move out.
 

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Conky said:
I have a set of Formula K18's and the problem is that my rear brake is rubbing. The caliper is not centered with the disk so one side is rubbing [ the side closest to the frame".
I need to have "less space" but cannot as I already have no shims on.

Its as if I need to move the caliper closer to the frame but cannot as there is already no shims in place!

Thanks.
have you been cleaning your calipers between brake pad changes, like the manual recommends? Any time you ride mud,, sticky calipers can become a problem. Pull the pads, squeeze the brake lever 2 or 3 times to push the caliper pistons out of their bores.. See which side is sticking, then put a single brake pad in on the non sticking side. Wedge a 2.5 or 3mm allen wrench in there, across the caliper, to block the non sticking side from moving and pull the brake lever 2 or 3 x to force the sticking caliper to move. reseat the sticking caliper back into its bore with a big screwdriver. Do this cycle 10 to 12 times to free the sticking caliper. pull the single brake pad, and with the calipers extended out of their bores, get some rubbing alcohol and an old toothbrush, and clean the surfaces of the caliper pistons that fit inside the bore. After they are clean, relubricate sparingly with silicone grease from a plumbing supply house on the caliper surface that has friction with the caliper bore, full 360 degrees. Press the caliper pistons clear back in to the bore, reinstall the pads, pull the brake lever a few times, and tighten them up.

You will have to do this routine every time you change brake pads, it's normal service. I get maybe 600 miles or a month and a half out of a set of pads on my K18's.
 
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