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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I've got about 20 outings on my Cura brakes thus far, after coming off 2 sets of failed Magura brakes (Mt7 and Trail Sport)...and Guide Ultimates on 2 previous bikes.

Overall I think the Cura are a tremendous value...I give them a 7 or 8 out of 10. Power is equivalent to Guides. Not quite enough to lockup the front wheel, but close. Good feel and modulation, but not quite as good as Guide. And they will not fade! I took them down a scary-steep decent that were too much for my Guides, causing serious fade and scary loss of power. But the Cura didn't exhibit any fade or loss of power.

Where the Cura fall short for me is the pad-to-rotor clearance. I've gone through a couple sets of rotors, and spent more time truing than I care to admit. But it's been no use...inevitable I get a little rubbing/ticking sound...not enough to rob any power, but just enough to annoy me.

8/19 Edit: third time is a charm...I'm onto my 3rd front rotor in as many months and I finally have one that's true enough to avoid any rubbing/"ticking" sound. I'm much happier at the moment. Still, despite the class-leading power (for 2-piston), periodically on really steep descents requiring a lot of braking, I'm wishing for more power in the front.

9/7 edit - I put a 4-piston Cura on the front, which had ample pad-rotor clearance. Subsequently, I worked and balanced out the pistons on the rear 2-piston caliper and was left with ample pad clearance...akin to Guides...at the expense of a little longer dead lever throw. I'm now extremely happy with these brakes and love the mis-match setup. Pretty much perfect... I only wish they had a crosshair type alignment system like Hayes (all brake companies would be wise to follow suit on that!).
 

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I've got about 20 outings on my Cura brakes thus far, after coming off 2 sets of failed Magura brakes (Mt7 and Trail Sport)...and Guide Ultimates on 2 previous bikes.

Overall I think the Cura are a tremendous value...I give them a 7 or 8 out of 10. Power is equivalent to Guides. Not quite enough to lockup the front wheel, but close. Good feel and modulation, but not quite as good as Guide. And they will not fade! I took them down a scary-steep decent that were too much for my Guides, causing serious fade and scary loss of power. But the Cura didn't exhibit any fade or loss of power.

Where the Cura fall short for me is the pad-to-rotor clearance. I've gone through a couple sets of rotors, and spent more time truing than I care to admit. But it's been no use...inevitable I get a little rubbing/ticking sound...not enough to rob any power, but just enough to annoy me.
Hi RAG2,

It's weird that you get rubbing/ticking, some others say that the pad clearance isn't the best c/f e.g. Shimano, but don't have any issues.

Can you get the brakes to be noise free (rub/tick) in the workstand before you tighten the caliper bolts?

If you can, then incrementally tighten alternating bolts a little at a time (this should stop the caliper moving as you tighten it), and in between spin the wheel to ensure that the caliper hasn't moved.

A great way to do this is with the bike upside down with a well-lit light-coloured floor (for high contrast), I use white paper, so one can easily see the gab between the pad and rotor.

Using the iterative tightening method with the bike upside down on the floor, I can get my old 2010 Formulas (before they increased the pad roll-back) to be rub free.

Else, you may have a slightly sticky piston that needs to be freed. Do they both move in/out the same amount?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi RAG2,

It's weird that you get rubbing/ticking, some others say that the pad clearance isn't the best c/f e.g. Shimano, but don't have any issues.

Can you get the brakes to be noise free (rub/tick) in the workstand before you tighten the caliper bolts?

If you can, then incrementally tighten alternating bolts a little at a time (this should stop the caliper moving as you tighten it), and in between spin the wheel to ensure that the caliper hasn't moved.

A great way to do this is with the bike upside down with a well-lit light-coloured floor (for high contrast), I use white paper, so one can easily see the gab between the pad and rotor.

Using the iterative tightening method with the bike upside down on the floor, I can get my old 2010 Formulas (before they increased the pad roll-back) to be rub free.

Else, you may have a slightly sticky piston that needs to be freed. Do they both move in/out the same amount?
Thanks for the feedback. And no, best I can do is a minimal (tick/rub) before tightening, and generally I'm able to tighten without any movement, or I try again. One of the pistons does move a little more than the other, and my biggest problem is with the front (though rear brake clearance stil isnt great), so it's possible a sticky piston is a contributing factor. Gonna check that out further now...

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Bike shops (2 of them) indicated it was a leak in the master cylinder. Same issue that failed in my MT7 (although they lasted a while), so I returned for a refund.

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
That's disappointing to hear. So far mine have been awesome. *fingers crossed* lol.

I was looking at Formula's too but just couldn't pull the trigger on them as I couldn't find anyone local that had them to check out.
 

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Thanks for the feedback. And no, best I can do is a minimal (tick/rub) before tightening, and generally I'm able to tighten without any movement, or I try again.
You're not much having much luck with brakes, hopefully the rest of your bike is singing :)

That doesn't sound right. It's also possible that the system is a little overfilled. In case you don't already know, it's easy to sort this out by opening the bleed screw at the master cylinder, clean the pistons, then push the pistons back

See the following two vids from Park Tool, which cover piston balancing and cleaning.

[this is great for piston balancing]
https://www.pinkbike.com/video/478889/ [this is great for piston cleaning]
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yeah, I had a buddy, who's been a bike mechanic for 15 years, have a look at 'em. While he said the clearance is less than he likes, he said get a new rotor, this one is gonna be too hard to true and keep true. So I did, and now I'm noise/rub-free. So thata nice...but I still feel like I want more power. Fortunately I'm in line for a set of Trickstuff. Otherwise I'd probably go with Codes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Formula got back to me and said the Cura 4 and 2 use the same master cylinder, so I've ordered up a 4-pot For the front. The 2 has all the power I could want, for any use, in the rear. But when I drop the anchor with DHRII up front, the 2 doesnt stop quite hard enough and causes me more fatigue than I like. Hence the move to the 4 up front...I cant imagine this wont do the trick. Will report back soon!
 

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I agree, these brakes are incredible (plenty of power IMO) and would add that they are completely different from Shimano.

What rotors did you try? I am using my old r76 rotors and no issues. Are the Formula rotors better for these? Any difference?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
In response to your question...I ran a pair of Shimano xtr MT99 rotors at first, and then I went through 2 of the 2-piece Formula rotors up front before I got a good one that hardly needing any truing. If I didnt have centerlock hubs, I'd probably run basic 1-piece rotors, as I've found the 2-piece harder to true and stay true.

Cura 4 for the front is due to arrive today!
Edit: installed with one ride in. I posted to a Cura 4 thread already, but The pad-to-rotor gap/clearance is greater than anything I've had before and probably 2+ times greater than my Cura 2. But I suspect it's due to a soft/bad bleed. So the space is nice, but dead the lever throw is now too long and the lever is a little squishy. Will be cutting down and bleeding soon...
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Update: The Cura 2 might be the most underrated brake out there. I've been playing with a Cura 4 in the front but recently swapped back to the 2-pot while I await a bleed kit and new pads to arrive. I had also put a larger 203mm Ice Tech rotor up front a few months back...and all I can say is wow! The power is tremendous. Unless you're a really heavy rider (I'm only 160lb in birthday suit) I cant fathom needing more power. The rear 2-piston setup with 180mm IceTech has been tremendous since installing nearly a year ago. In fact, I was getting too much power (locking up at maybe 60% power) so I replaced the pads with cheapest organic pads I could find (Jagwire) and intentionally gave up some power. Now locks up at about 75% power, which along with the larger rotor up front, I have a much better balance and I dont have to think so much about grabbing more front brake than rear when I want to drop the anchor.

Only negative i can think of would be the tight pad-to-rotor tolerance/clearance...which is also the very thing that makes this the best feeling brake I've tried with ultra-short engagement at the lever.

Light, powerful, reliable and inexpensive...winner!

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I agree, these brakes are incredible (plenty of power IMO) and would add that they are completely different from Shimano.

What rotors did you try? I am using my old r76 rotors and no issues. Are the Formula rotors better for these? Any difference?
I had been running the Formula CL 2-piece 180mm up front with 180mm XTR MT900 in rear, but recently swapped to a 203mm XT MT 800 up front. Upon this swap, I am now feeling a little of that anti-lock pulsating feeling up front that I was not getting with the formula rotors (and yes I did an extensive bed-in process)... I suspect it's a combination of over all greater forces/torque as well as the uneven cut outs in XT rotor (it has large cutouts between 4 small cutouts). But not terribly bad, and call me crazy... I think the large cut outs in the rotor might actually a practical anti I lock effect. I can literally feel the pulsating and just yesterday I was intentionally locking up the front, which requires pretty much 100% power, and the front would toggle between locking up and releasing.


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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The brake pads that come with these brakes are great. I think a contributing factor to why these are so powerful. They say organic, but I think they semi-metallic if some sort/blend. I recently replaced the rear pads with basic Jagwire organic (because they were pretty much worn out and because I was trying to give up a little power because back was locking up to easily relative to front, for my liking). It worked...power was reduced substantially. When going through stream crossings, I couldn't believe how noisy the Jagwire organic were and how much power loss there was. The Formula pads dont make any noise when wet and dont seem to loose a noticable amount of power. On the description, they say good in wet or dry...they are right.

Anyways...really good pads!
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
I just noticed on the cura for on the formula website it says they come with organic pads with metallic particles for good wet and dry riding. I'm betting it's the same pad compound used in the cura 2 and my hunch was correct. Anyways, great pads that help make these brakes plenty powerful.
 
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