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· Registered
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a new Otso Voytek. I am debating on a suspension fork and need some suggestions. I want to run 29" rims in the summer. I already have DT swiss hubs to make a 2nd wheelset. I also have a boost carbon 29" wheelset (debating on taking the rear apart to use the rim with the dt 350 177 hub).

Mastadon Pro 120 standard for year round use (may stay rigid in the winter, haven't decided) and use the DT swiss front hub to make a carbon rim front wheel.

Fox 34 120 or RS SID ultimate or RS Pike Ultimate (all for 3 season use with a 29" wheelset) and use my boost carbon front rim.

Any input or thoughts? I have a full squish 29er, but thinking of selling it and just keeping the Voytek as my only ride.
 

· Elitest thrill junkie
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41,092 Posts
Really depends on what your winter is and what the trails are like. If it's all on snow, "groomed" or not, rigid is probably the way to go, with a dropper for tech stuff and moves. There's more going for you in the winter to make the big tires work, slower speeds that generally don't bite as bad for bumps (because traction limits speed), lower pressures than summer due to less impact risk, snow absorbing some energy, even when it's fairly compacted, snow and ice filling in-between roots and rocks and making the trail smoother. In the summer, none of this exists and IME the fat bike bounces you to hell on any kind of mtb trail. I'm not anti-suspension by any means, I have a Mastodon sitting right here, but my use is more for low-snow situations with hard frozen ground. Only you know your trails and if you need relief from the pounding. With multiple surgeries and issues, I totally understand that too.
 

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I run a Mastodon year round with both fat and 29+ wheels. I agree with @Jayem above, that it depends on what the winter holds for the trails in your area. Once we get 3-4 inches of show and tires, feet, and skis pack it in no suspension is needed and may actually be detrimental. However where I am at, even when I ditch work to catch the snow, rides on actual snow are only a very low percentage of the total. Most of the winter it is dry or post-holed ice, so the fork works wonders. It works well enough for me to leave on for summer season riding. If I got snow, the fatty would be rigid in the winter season.

As for selling the fully, I am looking to add one for versatility and back-saving. That is a personal decision, but where I am at the fat bike with suspension fork and multiple wheelsets works great as a one bike solution. That said, a multiple bike solution is still better, with diminishing returns on money spent.
 
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