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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just got a 2018 Fox 32 SC to put on my hardtail, and I have had some travel setting it up. I weigh about 130 lbs, and ride mostly blues with some blacks, in mostly northern utah but also down in st George and Moab. So far I have
1. Set sag to 20%, rebound what is recommended, and the open mode adjust to completely open. After that, I rode a trail, but wasn't able to use all of my travel, but I was blowing through the mid stroke.
2. Took a little bit of air out to set sag at 23%, did an easier trail, with no technical sections and was able to use full travel easily.

My main problem is that I want to increase the mid stroke support, but because I am light volume spacers would make it harder for me to use all of my travel.

Would the open mode adjust do anything, or would I need to get volume spacers?

Thanks
 

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I just got a 2018 Fox 32 SC to put on my hardtail, and I have had some travel setting it up. I weigh about 130 lbs, and ride mostly blues with some blacks, in mostly northern utah but also down in st George and Moab. So far I have
1. Set sag to 20%, rebound what is recommended, and the open mode adjust to completely open. After that, I rode a trail, but wasn't able to use all of my travel, but I was blowing through the mid stroke.
2. Took a little bit of air out to set sag at 23%, did an easier trail, with no technical sections and was able to use full travel easily.

My main problem is that I want to increase the mid stroke support, but because I am light volume spacers would make it harder for me to use all of my travel.

Would the open mode adjust do anything, or would I need to get volume spacers?

Thanks
Fox’s midstroke support is horrible. The problem is this is something you can’t fix by playing with the controls: It’s an internal adjustment to tune them. Not getting full travel is definitely a thing with their forks. I had to have mine completely retuned to work right.

Some custom tuners who you might want to reach out to:
  • The Shock Howse (theshockhowse.com). This the one I use
  • Avalanche Racing
  • Dirt Labs I think will do custom tuning
  • Maybe Fox too

I’m sure others have recommendations as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Fox’s midstroke support is horrible. The problem is this is something you can’t fix by playing with the controls: It’s an internal adjustment to tune them. Not getting full travel is definitely a thing with their forks. I had to have mine completely retuned to work right.

Some custom tuners who you might want to reach out to:
  • The Shock Howse (theshockhowse.com). This the one I use
  • Avalanche Racing
  • Dirt Labs I think will do custom tuning
  • Maybe Fox too

I’m sure others have recommendations as well.
Before I have to do that, would it be worth trying volume spacers or other settings?
 

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Before I have to do that, would it be worth trying volume spacers or other settings?
Of course its worth trying. It's way cheaper....Also, you won't always use "full travel" every ride, so keeping your expectations reasonable is important. But at the end of the day the Fox 32/RS Sid are XC forks, designed for being as light as possible. The small air piston size and smaller negative volume is going to cause tradeoffs. So play around with settings and if you can session a section of trail while back-to-backing the changes so that you can truly feel what the changes do and feel like. This will help for the next time you need to tune a fork/shock/etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Of course its worth trying. It's way cheaper....Also, you won't always use "full travel" every ride, so keeping your expectations reasonable is important. But at the end of the day the Fox 32/RS Sid are XC forks, designed for being as light as possible. The small air piston size and smaller negative volume is going to cause tradeoffs. So play around with settings and if you can session a section of trail while back-to-backing the changes so that you can truly feel what the changes do and feel like. This will help for the next time you need to tune a fork/shock/etc.
Of course its worth trying. It's way cheaper....Also, you won't always use "full travel" every ride, so keeping your expectations reasonable is important. But at the end of the day the Fox 32/RS Sid are XC forks, designed for being as light as possible. The small air piston size and smaller negative volume is going to cause tradeoffs. So play around with settings and if you can session a section of trail while back-to-backing the changes so that you can truly feel what the changes do and feel like. This will help for the next time you need to tune a fork/shock/etc.

Thanks. That is a lot of help.
 

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Of course its worth trying. It's way cheaper....Also, you won't always use "full travel" every ride, so keeping your expectations reasonable is important. But at the end of the day the Fox 32/RS Sid are XC forks, designed for being as light as possible. The small air piston size and smaller negative volume is going to cause tradeoffs. So play around with settings and if you can session a section of trail while back-to-backing the changes so that you can truly feel what the changes do and feel like. This will help for the next time you need to tune a fork/shock/etc.
Oh yeah. Forgot about all those stupid volume spacers and the overgreasing that it comes factory with. Thanks for the reminder. Didn’t mean to jump the gun on ya.

I always do two things when I had my Fox fork:
  • take out all the volume spacers
  • service the fork to clean out all the excess oil that acts like volume spacers.

Then, try it again. I still found after that I couldn’t get it to feel right for me, but maybe I’m overly sensitive to those things.

Let us know how it goes, ajen2410!
 

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Volume spacers are mostly going to affect ramp up, so aren't going to help a lot with midstroke, though obviously can help some.

I'm somewhat light and run both of my fox forks with no volume spacers. I've also had to deal with the excess oil issue and that helped the fork feel better in general (less harsh).
 

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Oh yeah. Forgot about all those stupid volume spacers and the overgreasing that it comes factory with. Thanks for the reminder. Didn’t mean to jump the gun on ya.

I always do two things when I had my Fox fork:
  • take out all the volume spacers
  • service the fork to clean out all the excess oil that acts like volume spacers.

Then, try it again. I still found after that I couldn’t get it to feel right for me, but maybe I’m overly sensitive to those things.

Let us know how it goes, ajen2410!
Honestly, I think that's a good strategy with any fork someone buys at least in regards to the cleaning out the excess grease. At 140ish lbs it certainly seems difficult to utilize volume spacers, but again that's for every fork. I also think it helps a lot to make sure that the stanchions have proper tolerancing in the bushings (more of a RockShox problem it appears) and also swap the fork seals to the SKFs or something else with less friction (how much does that help? Not sure but it makes me feel better). Regardless, I'm a believer in doing lower leg services more often then not, to keep the thing running as well as I can.

Volume spacers are mostly going to affect ramp up, so aren't going to help a lot with midstroke, though obviously can help some.

I'm somewhat light and run both of my fox forks with no volume spacers. I've also had to deal with the excess oil issue and that helped the fork feel better in general (less harsh).
So I think a lot of what goes wrong (especially with these smaller forks) is people start chasing small bump compliance. So you increase SAG % trying to chase feeling good over rocks and bumps, and it cycles out of control with regards to mid and end stroke. I tend to run recommended or stiffer air spring pressures and low tire pressures. Obviously I don't know everyone's settings here, but make sure OP that you have chased your tire pressures as low as they can really go as the tire should be doing a lot of the small bump compliance work. I think a lot of people leave their tire pressures too high and end up chasing issues with the fork that the fork can't fix. I have found that to be a very important key to riding in rooty North Carolina at least. If a trail I'm on doesn't have a lot of high G berms, drops, etc I'll run 17-19 psi on a 2.4" front and 19-21 psi on a 2.4" rear. And honestly I only come up on those pressures a couple PSI for rowdy days, unless I'm dealing with lots of jumps, berms, and flow lines.

Horses for courses as they say, so even the setting you use on one trail won't necessarily work for another. Obviously we don't have time to figure every thing out perfectly, so finding the compromises you're happy with is key.
 

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Honestly, I think that's a good strategy with any fork someone buys at least in regards to the cleaning out the excess grease. At 140ish lbs it certainly seems difficult to utilize volume spacers, but again that's for every fork. I also think it helps a lot to make sure that the stanchions have proper tolerancing in the bushings (more of a RockShox problem it appears) and also swap the fork seals to the SKFs or something else with less friction (how much does that help? Not sure but it makes me feel better). Regardless, I'm a believer in doing lower leg services more often then not, to keep the thing running as well as I can.

So I think a lot of what goes wrong (especially with these smaller forks) is people start chasing small bump compliance. So you increase SAG % trying to chase feeling good over rocks and bumps, and it cycles out of control with regards to mid and end stroke. I tend to run recommended or stiffer air spring pressures and low tire pressures. Obviously I don't know everyone's settings here, but make sure OP that you have chased your tire pressures as low as they can really go as the tire should be doing a lot of the small bump compliance work. I think a lot of people leave their tire pressures too high and end up chasing issues with the fork that the fork can't fix. I have found that to be a very important key to riding in rooty North Carolina at least. If a trail I'm on doesn't have a lot of high G berms, drops, etc I'll run 17-19 psi on a 2.4" front and 19-21 psi on a 2.4" rear. And honestly I only come up on those pressures a couple PSI for rowdy days, unless I'm dealing with lots of jumps, berms, and flow lines.

Horses for courses as they say, so even the setting you use on one trail won't necessarily work for another. Obviously we don't have time to figure every thing out perfectly, so finding the compromises you're happy with is key.
In a fork, I absolutely hate volume spacers with a passion. I really prefer coil to the point I won't even run an air fork anymore because I cannot get them to feel right.

Chasing small bump compliance is getting your suspension set for comfort and not performance IMO. A lot of that can be changed with tires (PSI) rather than the ever so slightest fork tweak so you're definitely right on that. I also found that changing out my tires to a different brand actually improved my small bump compliance on both my fork and rear shock because the original brand I was using just felt like the tire was either too hard or too squirrelly.

Most of my courses are very much flow and jumps and drops, so I tend to run higher pressures. For my suspension, I've found I need the midstroke support or I'll blow right through the travel. I've also found that I like a lighter rebound tune and a medium compression (both high speed and low speed), and once I found tires I got along with, it's much easier to keep those tunes right and not have to fiddle with the knobs every ride and worry about maxing out travel.

Also, I think there's too much focus on maxing out suspension travel as well as comfort and not enough on performance. What I want out of my suspension is for my bike to perform consistently, and if I need to change anything for a specific trail, I'm going to start with the PSI rather than the suspension settings.
 

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Take the volume spacer out...all of them. Try using the same air pressure as your weight in kilograms. I'm about 150lbs all geared up...about 68kg...so I put in 68psi. Dial in from there. That pressure has worked pretty well for me. I don't use any tokens in any of my forks.

If you've never removed the air cap...do it and check the volume spacers. I had a Rock Shox Yari a few years ago...I was wondering why I could not get full travel. I removed the air cap and found 5 volume spacers in there. I took all of them out.

Only time I really use full travel is if its a really hard hit...sometimes a deep g-out...or riding off a drop.
 

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Take the volume spacer out...all of them. Try using the same air pressure as your weight in kilograms. I'm about 150lbs all geared up...about 68kg...so I put in 68psi. Dial in from there. That pressure has worked pretty well for me. I don't use any tokens in any of my forks.

If you've never removed the air cap...do it and check the volume spacers. I had a Rock Shox Yari a few years ago...I was wondering why I could not get full travel. I removed the air cap and found 5 volume spacers in there. I took all of them out.

Only time I really use full travel is if its a really hard hit...sometimes a deep g-out...or riding off a drop.
I swear I hate that RS and Fox do that. Why does anyone need or want that much ramp-up unless you're on a DJ.

That's a good formula. Gonna recommend that to folks for basic fork setups, after taking out all the spacers of course :)
 

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I ignore fork sag. It will be whatever it will be to achieve the kind of support I want. Unlike the rear, sag means little up front. My advice is don't measure sag.
 

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I ignore fork sag. It will be whatever it will be to achieve the kind of support I want. Unlike the rear, sag means little up front. My advice is don't measure sag.
Same. I've gotten better setup results with my fork by ignoring any sag #'s at first. Definitely keep the rear within whatever range the Mfg says though.
 
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Oh yeah. Forgot about all those stupid volume spacers and the overgreasing that it comes factory with. Thanks for the reminder. Didn’t mean to jump the gun on ya.

I always do two things when I had my Fox fork:
  • take out all the volume spacers
  • service the fork to clean out all the excess oil that acts like volume spacers.

Then, try it again. I still found after that I couldn’t get it to feel right for me, but maybe I’m overly sensitive to those things.

Let us know how it goes, ajen2410!
Second this one. Definitely do a lower leg and air spring service. Fox was famous to fill negative chambers with slick honey, but seems doing better recently. Also put slick honey on the wiper, make sure foam rings are not dry, and use proper fork oil in the lower. Less stiction is always better. A functional negative chamber could potentially allow you up the psi a bit while keeping the same small bump compliance. Using less token also allows you to bottom out at the time you need, with high psi.

Mid-stroke support is mostly a spring thing, which is mostly a function of psi for a given design. Damper impacts high shaft speed events that body/arm cannot really react to.

Unfortunately, SC cannot take either Secus or Luftkappe. DSD Runt is available for 34 SC.
 
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