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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently picked up an older IF deluxe that I have been building up this winter. I have an older tora 318 solo air that I will put on for a bit, but am not sure that is the fork I want to stay with. The frame was built for an 80 mm fork, so I will probably stay between 80 and 100.

Any recommendations for a favorite fork for this bike?
 

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SID's, Reba's & Fox F-series(f-80 or f-100 RLC or Fit RLC). Can't go wrong with any of those choices.

I like my rockshox forks - SID world cup & Reba team 29. Blackbox damping is nice. Smooth, active, and they use all their travel. They are also rather easy to work on and need minimal tools to get the jobs done(from what I have seen the Fox's are also easy to work on - they do say the new Fit damper is not as user friendly).

Magura and Whitebrothers also make nice forks, I just haven't had as much time with those.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks, this is probably the closest that I will come to a custom, so I would like a fork that lives up to the frame. My other bike is a GF Hifi with a manitou minute, so I don't have a lot of experience when it comes to forks.
 

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One thing to consider is that the forks I mentioned(SID/Reba & F-series) do require more regular maintenance. The forks contain very little bath oil, so it needs to be changed more frequently. I do the bath oil(in the lowers) every 20-30 hrs riding time and check the whole thing every other service.

If you buy a fork like this, it is important to have the tools(minimal amount needed) and do the services yourself. Like I said, they are rather simple(get better with practice) and both RS & Fox have excellent service guides to help you through the process.

Have fun with the Indep Fab build - gotta be Ti right?
 

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This got me thinking about my recent Felt build. I put an older 80mm Rock Shox SID on a NOS '08 Felt RXC. Current Felts use 100mm forks but the '08 RXC came speced with a 100/85 Reba and 2007's came speced with a Fox 80mm. The 2010 models and the 07/08 models all have the same basic geometry. For a 21.5 frame HA - 72.5, HT - 150, FC - 680, Rake - 39. Eff TT is 635 but actual TT is about 3mm different ('08 is longer). Wheelbase is about 1mm different ('08 shorter). I don't think I'll have any problems using an 80mm fork but does anyone else have any thoughts?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
ncfisherman said:
One thing to consider is that the forks I mentioned(SID/Reba & F-series) do require more regular maintenance. The forks contain very little bath oil, so it needs to be changed more frequently. I do the bath oil(in the lowers) every 20-30 hrs riding time and check the whole thing every other service.

If you buy a fork like this, it is important to have the tools(minimal amount needed) and do the services yourself. Like I said, they are rather simple(get better with practice) and both RS & Fox have excellent service guides to help you through the process.

Have fun with the Indep Fab build - gotta be Ti right?
Thanks, I come from the road side, so I am comfortable with basic wrenching. Suspensions and hydraulic brakes are new to me. I will visit the RD and Fox sites.

Alas, the budget was for steel, not Ti, but it is still a pretty cool ride.
 

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joelhunn said:
Thanks, I come from the road side, so I am comfortable with basic wrenching. Suspensions and hydraulic brakes are new to me. I will visit the RD and Fox sites.

Alas, the budget was for steel, not Ti, but it is still a pretty cool ride.
Rockshox kinda tuck's their service guides away - hard to find. So I thought I would put up a link for you: 2010 SRAM Technical Manual. The rest of the technical manuals are under "For dealers" at "technical manuals" on the service page.

That manual covers all of their forks(their technologies are very similar throughout the lineup) and that is why it is so large. You'll need to pick out the specific pages you will need to follow, but it is rather straightforward. I typically just print out the pages I need, and not the entire manual.

Good luck with the choice and the new bike. Steel or Ti, still a sweet/unique frame.
 
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