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PokeyOne
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I bought the tool to size/burnish the slider bushings in my Lyrik.
The first fork I did was a new Yari. The bushings were very tight and it took 15min of brute force on each leg to get the job done. It would be much easier with some sort of hydraulic press to do a new fork.
My Lyrik has about 100 hours on it. It was much easier to pass the tool head thru the bushings.
My fork had just recieved a 50hr service, and was running very smooth prior to the burnishing.

Out on the trail, the small bump chatter and mid stroke performance was noticeably improved. The fork seemed more willing to work thru the mid stroke. It felt like I was riding a freshly serviced fork with 5psi lower pressure.
The huge improvement was mid stroke performance under torsional load. With bike leaned over and pushing the pace thru a bomb cratered berm, the fork was outstanding.
Roots and ruts on any off camber trail or corner were equally as good.

Buy the tool if you do your own fork work. Find a servicer that does bushing sizing as part of their service.
 

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Lots of info on it here as well

 

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So I buy a $1000 fork and the manufacturer can't perform this simple process at the factory?
Correct. That's the way it works. Spend big money on an item and modify/fix/upgrade to make it work as advertised. But if you wait until next year, the mfg will have "fixed" issue while not fixing the issue.
 

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Banshee Titan, Ragley Bluepig
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It costs the manufacturer much less to make a change to a $1 debonair sealhead than spend a hour per fork at the factory doing this process. I think I heard somewhere that EXT do it at the factory
 

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It costs the manufacturer much less to make a change to a $1 debonair sealhead than spend a hour per fork at the factory doing this process. I think I heard somewhere that EXT do it at the factory
I thought that too, but had to send my EXT Era back due to excessively tight bushings.

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It isn't about the labor costs or the qa/qc on this particular item. There are plenty of things with suspension products that fall into that category, but this isn't one of them. They make the bushings this tight to cater to the lowest common denominator, which is those of us that run suspension products into the ground without lower or full services. If you were to start with the bushings reamed to the looser side of the tolerances, then 200hrs without service and running the bath oil mostly dry and dirty, could mean that you end up with bushing tolerances loose enough to cause knocking or fore/aft play. Some lower volume, highest tier performance suspension products can make this sacrifice as they know that their user base is a cut above the rest when it comes to service and paying attention to condition, as well as valuing performance above all else.

What we are doing here is pushing the clearance to the loosest end of the manufacturing tolerance. This basically removes any needed fabrication and service interval tolerances and gives you better performance in the process. Technically, the bushings could have less of a service life after being reamed, bust most of us that are taking the time to ream the bushings in our forks, are also performing lower leg services on an interval that will make the bushings out last our attention span with a particular product (and likely last "practically forever").

Now, regarding the question on reaming bushings, I suggest you read the thread. I am a rabid suspension tuner and rebuilder on a hobby level, for myself and everyone in my riding crew. I bought one of these tools and it has had dollar for dollar, the biggest impact on suspension performance then any other product I've purchased. Not saying that this has to be the only tuning tool, as I frequently throw the kitchen sink at suspension products... But from this point on, I won't be putting money into a fork until I've properly reamed the bushings and achieved baseline settings.

The thread linked above has all of the information you could need.
 
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