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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Wasn't really sure where to post this...

My dog (golden retriever) is a knucklehead and I don't trust him off his leash. I'm pretty sure none of the trails around here allow unleashed dogs anyway...

I'm wondering what works for you guys & gals?
I don't want anything attached to the bike, because I'm sure he'd have me down in no time. I feel like if he's tethered to me we'd both be safer.

I probably wouldn't ride single track with him, because that just seems nuts. But I'd mostly do bike paths & downtown city rides by the lake (Michigan).

Btw, his name is Guinness.
 

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For bike paths and around the neighborhood where they enforce leash laws, you can get by with just sandwiching the leash between your palm and the grip. Don't wrap or hook it around anything, if your dog tugs on it, it will slip free. This assumes your dog will basically heel next to you while running and is obedient if the leash comes free.

My lab will run along in front of my bike on single track, or right next to my feet. They are pretty good about staying out of the way once they get a tire bump or two, and i just holler at him if im about to catch up to him on a fast downhill. You do have to be careful not to overheat them or run their pads off, even if they are in great shape.

I really would recommend training your dog, as long as they are intelligent and not skittish, anything is possible with a bit of time. Find someone who knows what they are doing to show or help you, it makes your life and theirs worlds easier.
 

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Training your dog is key. I lead my boxer on a 6' leash w 2 knots in it. I put the loop through my wrist, this is how I lead my dog on my fire road climbs. I do this mostly as I occasionally encounter a dog that is not under their owners control and trips to the vet ruin my bike rides. Downhill single track she is ALWAYS behind me. Train your dog to always follow you as the leader and you will have an enjoyable ride along with one of the luckiest dogs around.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
He has tons of energy & I'm trying to do something fun for him.. My concern would be other dogs, all he wants to do is play. Or if he sees a squirrel or rabbit. He's trained and will heel, unless he sees either of those two things and then it's game on. He'd probably be a great hunting dog.

I'm envisioning some type of harness where I could connect the leash to my chest or something...

I'll try the google machine

Sent from my SCH-R530U using Tapatalk
 

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Train him. Take him to doggie day care to help him get some exercise and make use of that energy. Do not ride with a dog that you don't trust to ride with you. It's dangerous for you, for him, and for other riders.

I have a border collie who is my riding buddy. Despite being very obedient and born to run, it was a good year of training before she could ride single track with me - daily drills, runs, etc., and lots of new words for her to learn (off, back, side, right/left).

I also have a golden. Love him dearly. But he's not a biking dog - not even a leash on trails for many of the same reasons you cite.
 

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Yeah training is important, but I feel that the dogs personality has just as much to do with it. If you have friends who take their dogs out, take yours and maybe the "follow the pack" mentality will help train your dog or at least show him how it's done.

I was lucky, I was worried about my dog getting it, and was pleasantly surprised when she just naturally followed me right from the start with no problems (she's a scattered goof ball also). That being said, she's still a dog, so squirrels and smells do distract her. I ride a relatively deserted trail so I just slow down a bit and she catches up in 10-20 seconds. That's one of the reason I take her out though is to smell new smells and see new and different things.

DOG BACON!!! She knows I have the bacon (broken up into small pieces) on me so she will never go too far. Never underestimate the power of a treat. She will also drink from my camelbak squirted at her. Possibly try some short single track at a slow time of day to test him. Goldens don't seem to be the type to run "away" but they may wander. I have found that keeping moving, even at a slow pace, is enough for them to want to stay with you. The worst days are the days I'm working on the trail, she gets bored and wanders around.

Watch the temperature and the distance. I don't take my dog out if it's over 70 degrees and even though she's done 10 miles many times before, I keep it to under 4 (and a slow 4) now that she's getting older.

Have fun. Don't stress too much over the other people, if the 10-15 seconds someone else encounters your dog "ruins their ride" then their ride was already ruined before you got there. Just stay in contact with the dog, always encouraging and praising for staying with you, keeping up and coming when you call. Treats and water when you stop. Keep it all positive and he will "get it" and love it.

Beware of the monster you are creating. Once they get a taste of the trail, "Trail Dogs" will want to come every time you grab your camelbak.
 

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My opinion, I wouldn't recommend have your dog tied to your core as you are riding. 1 your dog you may need to be let go for a number of reasons, being tied to you waist or or your chest makes this almost impossible. 2, a harness in my dog rubs the skin raw on a couple of 10 mile runs a week, a collar should sufficient. The point of a leash is to "lead" your dog, and comply with leash laws if they apply. I only leash my dog in areas with high dog and hiker populations, and going up hill when my dog is faster than me and gets bored being behind me. You don't want a tight leash or situations where you need to drag your dog. If you have a puppy, start off small, like go to a park or the beach and train your dog to chase you on foot with treats or a ball, whatever motivates him. It won't take long for him to learn to follow.
 
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