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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
today is the first day i used my clipless set up.
i bought specialized mtb comp shoes and shimano pd-m545 pedal.
my left foot arch cramps up after a mile or 2 of riding. do u think if i loosen the clip under the shoe and slide it out would help?
 

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Try to emulate your normal foot position on the pedal . It can take some trial and error but if your patient you will get it . You also want to be sure that your shoes arent the cause of your foot pain , correct fit , insoles etc. I'm sure others have some helpful advice . Good luck .
 

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1. cleat on shoe should be at the center of the ball of the foot directly over the pedal spindle....(to start)

2. both cleats need to be aligned exactly the same on both shoes.....millimeters count...

3. make sure both cleats are tight...no wiggling allowed.

from here you can make adjustments to cleat position....fore/aft...side-to-side....

normally a misplaced cleat will give your knees the problem....so it's more-than-likely what they all said above...your shoes ^^^^

;)
 

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Depending on the type of foot you have - sliding the cleat towards the back of the shoe may help. People with high arches will cramp up if the cleat is positioned too close to the toes of the shoe. The ideal postion is at the ball of the foot or even slightly behind it. Experiment...
 

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That's an interesting problem considering I just bought the same shoes and have foot pain only in one foot as well. I've been riding clipless for a couple of years now but have used the entry-level Specialized Taho which had more give. I find that after about 10-15mins of riding the outside of my right foot starts to ache, pretty much from the bottom of my pinky toe to just in front of my heel (only on the right side). Really strange, I figure that it may just be the rigidity of the new shoe compared to my last, hopefully my foot gets used to it...
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
tdotrider said:
That's an interesting problem considering I just bought the same shoes and have foot pain only in one foot as well. I've been riding clipless for a couple of years now but have used the entry-level Specialized Taho which had more give. I find that after about 10-15mins of riding the outside of my right foot starts to ache, pretty much from the bottom of my pinky toe to just in front of my heel (only on the right side). Really strange, I figure that it may just be the rigidity of the new shoe compared to my last, hopefully my foot gets used to it...
thanks for your replys.. i will make some adjustments today and see if there is a difference.
 

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Get some foot beds, even some Superfeet insoles are better than stock. The bottom of a cycling shoe is made to be stiff to transmit power. Therefore, it does not conform with your foot as well as a standard shoe. You may be able to get rid of the foot cramp with a properly supported sole of your foot. Worked for me in my Sidis, plus they fit better and I get slightly better power down because my foot no longer "deforms" as I pedal.
 

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As a flat pedal rider, you may have spent a lot of time riding with the pedal mid-foot, both up and down-hill. SPDs tend to have the cleat and foot-position much further toward the toes, and getting used to this may require some re-adjustment in your foot and calf muscles. If this is the problem in your case I suggest positioning the cleat as far back as possible on the shoe, and just easing into the SPD riding over a few weeks. Note there is no 'correct' position of cleats in terms of fore/aft position- different positions have different benefits in terms of performance, stability and control.
 
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