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That bike has me intrigued! Foes is always ahead of the game in terms of innovation.... Think back to 6" travel in the rear when there was only 2-3" forks, Curnutt suspension, floating brake, first 6" sub 29lb trail bike, etc.

I think he is on to something, in a couple years the 650b and 29er bikes may be relegated to the obsolete, replaced with the amalgamation of the two sizes. I look forward to trying this bike out and maybe add it to my quiver of three other Foes rigs I have at the moment.

Anyone ride this new bike and have comments as compared to either the 650b of 29er sizes ?
 

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That bike has me intrigued! Foes is always ahead of the game in terms of innovation.... Think back to 6" travel in the rear when there was only 2-3" forks, Curnutt suspension, floating brake, first 6" sub 29lb trail bike, etc.

I think he is on to something, in a couple years the 650b and 29er bikes may be relegated to the obsolete, replaced with the amalgamation of the two sizes. I look forward to trying this bike out and maybe add it to my quiver of three other Foes rigs I have at the moment.

Anyone ride this new bike and have comments as compared to either the 650b of 29er sizes ?
I also look forward to try this beauty!
 

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The Foes video makes you think this is a great idea, but running a 29+ wheel is not agile in the least!

I ran 29+ on my Mutz for a week; replacing a 27+ wheelset that I ran since Spring, and I gotta say that though it was an educational experience, I was in no way enamored with 29+ on a trail bike.

Maybe if you only ride fast flow, no tech, no tight twisty stuff, no billy goat riding, then yeah, it'd be fun.

Just get the Alpine or a Mutz.
 

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The Foes video makes you think this is a great idea, but running a 29+ wheel is not agile in the least!

I ran 29+ on my Mutz for a week; replacing a 27+ wheelset that I ran since Spring, and I gotta say that though it was an educational experience, I was in no way enamored with 29+ on a trail bike.

Maybe if you only ride fast flow, no tech, no tight twisty stuff, no billy goat riding, then yeah, it'd be fun.

Just get the Alpine or a Mutz.
With respect, Nurse Ben, the Mixer is not a 29+ bike. It may be able to accommodate plus-sized tires, I'm not sure, but the original iteration is a standard 29 wheel/tire in front and a standard 27.5 wheel/tire in back. This is the bike I've seen designed by Timberline Cycles and manufactured by Foes. I think the tires were 2.25 - 2.4 Maxxis Ardents.

I've ridden this bike, and it is an amazing ride. The larger front wheel gives you the roll-over benefits and stability of a 29'er, but without the long feeling of many 29'ers. You can feel the shorter chainstays and the rear wheel more tucked under you. As a result, the bike feels quick and lively. It wheelies and jumps very easily compared to the 29'ers I've ridden. It also pedals well, accelerates crisply and is easy to push hard in corners. I attribute some of this to the smaller rear wheel.

I rode this bike as a demo and did a challenging loop of about 14 miles that included a stiff, rock-filled climb (lots of step-ups, power moves and drops), fast swoopy descent and tight switchbacks. The mixer handled it all stunningly.

I just saw a post that a Foes' pro, Mike Metzger, rode one of these to a 1st in the open pro enduro in Snow Summit. And, one of Timberline's riders won the CO state championship on one. Not too shabby ;) Try one. Cheers,

E
 

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With respect, Nurse Ben, the Mixer is not a 29+ bike. It may be able to accommodate plus-sized tires, I'm not sure, but the original iteration is a standard 29 wheel/tire in front and a standard 27.5 wheel/tire in back. This is the bike I've seen designed by Timberline Cycles and manufactured by Foes. I think the tires were 2.25 - 2.4 Maxxis Ardents.

I've ridden this bike, and it is an amazing ride. The larger front wheel gives you the roll-over benefits and stability of a 29'er, but without the long feeling of many 29'ers. You can feel the shorter chainstays and the rear wheel more tucked under you. As a result, the bike feels quick and lively. It wheelies and jumps very easily compared to the 29'ers I've ridden. It also pedals well, accelerates crisply and is easy to push hard in corners. I attribute some of this to the smaller rear wheel.

I rode this bike as a demo and did a challenging loop of about 14 miles that included a stiff, rock-filled climb (lots of step-ups, power moves and drops), fast swoopy descent and tight switchbacks. The mixer handled it all stunningly.

I just saw a post that a Foes' pro, Mike Metzger, rode one of these to a 1st in the open pro enduro in Snow Summit. And, one of Timberline's riders won the CO state championship on one. Not too shabby ;) Try one. Cheers,

E
It is interesting to step back and consider how different the dynamics (forces, impacts etc) are for front and rear wheels. Frame and shock design reflect these differences, yet wheel dimensions traditionally have not. Makes you wonder if there will be a paradigm shift Down the road. We have seen it with such things as overall tire dimension, will the next wave embrace asymmetry between fron and rear dimension?
 

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It is interesting to step back and consider how different the dynamics (forces, impacts etc) are for front and rear wheels. Frame and shock design reflect these differences, yet wheel dimensions traditionally have not. Makes you wonder if there will be a paradigm shift Down the road. We have seen it with such things as overall tire dimension, will the next wave embrace asymmetry between fron and rear dimension?
I recently set my Knolly Warden up with a 29" front. For more info check out the B9 Warden thread in the Knolly forum. I agree that we will see more of these wheel combo's in the future. For riding here in the PNW, I think the asymmetric wheel sizes make more sense than plus sized tires. 2.4 to 2.5's on wide rims match the terrain here very well.
 

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Anyone know the widest tire that will fit on the rear?

Might be interesting to try a 2.5 or plus size in the rear.
 

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Anyone know the widest tire that will fit on the rear?

Might be interesting to try a 2.5 or plus size in the rear.
Mike from Timberline Cycles emailed me that a 3.0 275 would fit in the rear of the Enduro model.

I would like to test ride a Mixer Enduro along with a Mutz (never been on a Fat bike).
 

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Mike from Timberline Cycles emailed me that a 3.0 275 would fit in the rear of the Enduro model.I would like to test ride a Mixer Enduro along with a Mutz (never been on a Fat bike).
Spoke to Mike at TImberline yesterday. I recall him saying the Enduro will take 29 plus up front as well. Would be nice to test ride. Actually would be nice to test ride it against Mutz set up 275+. Then, when Alpine Plus comes out that will further confound choices...
 

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With respect, Nurse Ben, the Mixer is not a 29+ bike. It may be able to accommodate plus-sized tires, I'm not sure, but the original iteration is a standard 29 wheel/tire in front and a standard 27.5 wheel/tire in back. This is the bike I've seen designed by Timberline Cycles and manufactured by Foes. I think the tires were 2.25 - 2.4 Maxxis Ardents.

I've ridden this bike, and it is an amazing ride. The larger front wheel gives you the roll-over benefits and stability of a 29'er, but without the long feeling of many 29'ers. You can feel the shorter chainstays and the rear wheel more tucked under you. As a result, the bike feels quick and lively. It wheelies and jumps very easily compared to the 29'ers I've ridden. It also pedals well, accelerates crisply and is easy to push hard in corners. I attribute some of this to the smaller rear wheel.

I rode this bike as a demo and did a challenging loop of about 14 miles that included a stiff, rock-filled climb (lots of step-ups, power moves and drops), fast swoopy descent and tight switchbacks. The mixer handled it all stunningly.

I just saw a post that a Foes' pro, Mike Metzger, rode one of these to a 1st in the open pro enduro in Snow Summit. And, one of Timberline's riders won the CO state championship on one. Not too shabby ;) Try one. Cheers,

E
We went through this already on the 96er/69er, how many folks are still riding mixed wheel sizes?

I hear you, it's not a plus bike, though it goes without saying that it probably should be.

I suppose I could just swap front wheels and give it a go, it's plug and play for me, but it's gonna be hard to convince me a big ole wagon wheel on the front is gonna make me into a hero.

I'll report back with my findings ;)
 

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Intrigued by the mixer. Only concern is that the bottom bracket heights and chain stay lengths seem oftly high/long
Not sure where you get the chainstay length and bottom bracket height. The Mixer isn't listed in the Foes website yet, but their 27.5 bIke spec lists a 17.1 chainstay and 13.1 bb height, which seem pretty normal to me.
 

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Not sure where you get the chainstay length and bottom bracket height. The Mixer isn't listed in the Foes website yet, but their 27.5 bIke spec lists a 17.1 chainstay and 13.1 bb height, which seem pretty normal to me.
I think I saw it on mtbr. I think the enduro model was listed as having a 17.6" chain stay and 13.75 bb height
 

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I think I saw it on mtbr. I think the enduro model was listed as having a 17.6" chain stay and 13.75 bb height
Seems odd that they would use longer, higher geo on the Mixer when the idea of using the 27.5 rear wheel is to allow for a shorter rear center on a bike with a 29er front wheel.
 

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I've ridden this bike, and it is an amazing ride. The larger front wheel gives you the roll-over benefits and stability of a 29'er, but without the long feeling of many 29'ers. You can feel the shorter chainstays and the rear wheel more tucked under you. As a result, the bike feels quick and lively. It wheelies and jumps very easily compared to the 29'ers I've ridden. It also pedals well, accelerates crisply and is easy to push hard in corners. I attribute some of this to the smaller rear wheel.
Hi. I'm really intrigued by this bike, but the chainstays don't seem short to me at all; in fact, the length of them really put me off the bike. One article says "The Enduro Mixer will have...a 17.6" chainstay [That's the "Enduro" model. Ugh. That's longer than my Podium dh bike]," and another article says 17.1" stays for the Mixer Trail. The Evil Insurgent has 16.93" chainstays, while the 29er Canfield Riot has blissfully short 16.28" stays. I'm wondering how can you characterize the Mixer's stays as short? Am I maybe missing something? Failing to understand something? Loving the idea and look of the bike, but those long stays are a bummer (to me).
 

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My Take

I'm a skeptic -especially for mixed wheel, pressfit bottom brackets, and anything that is supposed to make me suddenly look better:cool:. So it took a lot to get me to ride the mixer. Not only did I ride it I bought one. My insights aren't for the "trail" model - rather the "enduro."

I set it up with a Fox 160 front and Fox 170 rear, so I expected it would descend well, and it does. What shocked me was how well it went uphill and handled things that were tight. I can get up tight switchbacks better than on my 140 trail bike and the Foes rails tight single track. My testimony is this: I see the 140 bike as pointless now and am selling it. I can climb as fast or faster and get up switchbacks better on the big bike. Going down, no contest. It is true all mountain. I've ridden it in Summit county before the snow hit and pushed it as hard as I'm comfortable in Fruita, I'm starting to get the all mountain idea.

I think too many people are trying to dissect individual pieces of the bike - wheel size, bb height, chainstay etc. All them are important, but each influences the other. Rather than just picking any one piece think of it as a total package that works amazingly well together. With the Fox 36 up front and a really stiff frame design I can push the mixed wheel through corners, hard.
 

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I'm a skeptic -especially for mixed wheel, pressfit bottom brackets, and anything that is supposed to make me suddenly look better:cool:. So it took a lot to get me to ride the mixer. Not only did I ride it I bought one. My insights aren't for the "trail" model - rather the "enduro."

I set it up with a Fox 160 front and Fox 170 rear, so I expected it would descend well, and it does. What shocked me was how well it went uphill and handled things that were tight. I can get up tight switchbacks better than on my 140 trail bike and the Foes rails tight single track. My testimony is this: I see the 140 bike as pointless now and am selling it. I can climb as fast or faster and get up switchbacks better on the big bike. Going down, no contest. It is true all mountain. I've ridden it in Summit county before the snow hit and pushed it as hard as I'm comfortable in Fruita, I'm starting to get the all mountain idea.

I think too many people are trying to dissect individual pieces of the bike - wheel size, bb height, chainstay etc. All them are important, but each influences the other. Rather than just picking any one piece think of it as a total package that works amazingly well together. With the Fox 36 up front and a really stiff frame design I can push the mixed wheel through corners, hard.
Thanks for your impressions. Something for me to think about. Thing is, I'm tall and my bikes have always been on the long side with longish stays. Last year I bought a Canfield Nimble 9 in XL, and it has ridiculously short stays and the wheelbase is shorter than many medium bikes out there. It's easily the most fun bike I've ever had with the possibly exception of my Knolly Delerium, which also had sliding chainstays that I'd slammed forward. I'm trying to retain that compact, flickable feeling. Long stays move me back away from that
 

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I would imagine that the Mixer is much more versatile and capable than a 140mm 26" wheel platform frame and for that matter any 27.5 based frame (Riders being equal) . I rode 96er for several seasons years ago and felt that it was significantly better than any 26" frame that I had previously owned. Please note that I ride aggressive cross country/trail /all mountain. I attributed the improved capability and performance of the 96er ,for the most part, to the 29inch wheel up front. I have been a staunch 29er rider since 2010. My current ride is a Shaver 29 with a Fox Float CTD/RS Rc3 fork suspension combo, AC Wide Lightning rims/Schwalbe 2.25's and Magura Next MT7 brakes 180F/160R . I am riding into my second year on the Foes and can attest to its amazing performance; climbing , descending , railing tight single track and negotiating all switchbacks without any issue at all. Recently back from a 2 day MTB trip in October up in East Burke VT - Kingdom trail network. Miles of very fast bermed / enduro like single-track/ downhill's, technical features, long switchback climbs ,etc.. The Shaver 29 absolutely crushed everything. I was fortunate to be riding with very capable mtb riders and friends. The Shaver 29 always had me in the lead pack charging as hard if not harder than any of my fellow riders on 27.5's , Fat bikes ,other 29ers and some old school 26ers . The Shaver 29 also allowed me to claw up technical stuff that stopped 27.5s in their tracks (I still don't get 27.5? I really think it is the power of marketing!lol) . And forget the momentum the Shaver 29 generates on flat swooping single-track and tempo climbs. Just incredible. I don't care what other mtb iteration is out there , for flat out or finesse single-track ripping, in my opinion, nothing beats a well executed 29er full suspension design!

I believe at the end of the day Foes just continues to provide its customers with an incredible execution of the 29er platform. It is that good. The Mixer maintains that amazing 29er front end with the application of a 27.5 rear. In my opinion, I would speculate that it does not measurably improve what Foes has done with the Shaver 29er platform so much so that it would compel me to change. However, those coming from 27.5 and 26 are going to definitely flip over the Mixer with its 29er front end ! And if anyone can avail a great additional iteration of the 29er platform, it would be Foes and his Mixer.
 
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