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Hey All,
I had an "incident" involving a roof rack and a garage, and though I'd rather not discuss the details, the end result was 1/2 dropouts on my float. I got off easy, no doubt about that, but I do need to replace the lowers and I was hoping someone could give me some pointers. Has anyone else done this before? Any advise would be appreciated.
 

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for a start

ew505 said:
Hey All,
I had an "incident" involving a roof rack and a garage, and though I'd rather not discuss the details, the end result was 1/2 dropouts on my float. I got off easy, no doubt about that, but I do need to replace the lowers and I was hoping someone could give me some pointers. Has anyone else done this before? Any advise would be appreciated.
Call Fox and ask about their crash replacement program or how much new lowers would cost..
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Did that...

That was my first thought as well.
I was told that it would run me $275 for repair, or they could send replacemnt lowers for $150. I just need to know if replacing them is something I can do myself.
 

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Replacing the lowers should be no problem. You will need to take the fork completely apart, just as if you were to replace the foam rings and dust wipers. Check www.enduroforkseals.com and you will find step-by-step instructions, with photos, on how to take apart the F100X. The procedure for the Float is the same. Hope this helps.
 

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carpe mañana
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You have two options here. If your fork hasn't been serviced recently, or ever, then you'll be best off replacing all the fluids inside while you replace the lowers. In this case, just take it apart as described on enduroforkseals.com under instructions.

If the fluids have been changed recently, then you can simply deflate the air chamber, flip the bike upside down (no need to remove the fork from the bike), undo the two bottom bolts (you'll need to remove the blue threshold knob first). Now, all you have to do is slide the broken lowers off (the oil will reside in the stanchion tubes, so it will not spill) and slide the new ones back on. Just make sure that there are foam rings and dust wipers installed in the new lowers. Replace the old crush washers with new ones and redo the bolts and reinstall the blue knob. Voila!

_MK
 

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MK_ said:
You have two options here. If your fork hasn't been serviced recently, or ever, then you'll be best off replacing all the fluids inside while you replace the lowers. In this case, just take it apart as described on enduroforkseals.com under instructions.

If the fluids have been changed recently, then you can simply deflate the air chamber, flip the bike upside down (no need to remove the fork from the bike), undo the two bottom bolts (you'll need to remove the blue threshold knob first). Now, all you have to do is slide the broken lowers off (the oil will reside in the stanchion tubes, so it will not spill) and slide the new ones back on. Just make sure that there are foam rings and dust wipers installed in the new lowers. Replace the old crush washers with new ones and redo the bolts and reinstall the blue knob. Voila!

_MK
I'm not sure that would work. I don't think theres enough space between the air-spring shaft and the ring/footing the negative spring rests on in the air side to get all of the oil inside the stanchion just by flipping it over. Especially if you deflate the fork and create more room between the end of the stanchion and the lower bushings. Same is true for the dampner side..not enough room..

But, I would be happy to be completely wrong. It would make installing Enduros 1000x easier. Someone needs try this..with some extra oil and rags handy :)

op
 

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ohpossum said:
don't think theres enough space between the air-spring shaft and the ring/footing the negative spring rests on in the air side to get all of the oil inside the stanchion just by flipping it over. Especially if you deflate the fork and create more room between the end of the stanchion and the lower bushings. Same is true for the dampner side..not enough room..
There's only 20ml of oil on the air spring side for lubrication (that's aside from 5ml in the spring itself). In any case, there's more than enough room down there. The oil sits in the stanchion, with just a thin film coating the bushings. when you flip it upside down, it runs into the stanchions, especially when you deflate the air chamber and the negative spring collapses the fork.

As of the Enduro seals, I would still take your fork apart during seal change, as the damping oil surely needs to be replaced at that point.

_MK
 
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