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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

So I've been over to Mountain Creek in NJ a few times this summer and, low and behold, every time I go I manage to get at least 1 flat (i
pulled off 2 the most recent visit). I've got an enduro bike (YT Capra AL), so the tires don't have the extra thick casing of DH tires. I do, however have the extra thick DH thornproof tubes in. I don't run the tires at super high PSI, or super low...usually hover around 28-30 PSI. I've gotten flaps after rock gardens, jumps, drops...and even one unlucky flat where I apparently rode over glass on the road to Creek. I ride most of the trails at Creek, minus the double blacks (Dominion, etc.), and I think I'm at a decent skill level as far as technical skills go.

Anyways, my question(s) for you all is: Does anyone else have similar problems riding and constantly getting flats? I ride mostly XC but have been doing quite a bit of park this summer and I believe I'm at about 8 flats in the past 6 months (great track record, huh). If not, is it a matter of me choosing terrible lines, high/low PSI, or just plain old bad luck? I'd like to think it's more of a luck, or lack thereof, but if anyone else has experienced similar issues with flats that'd be reassuring ;)

One positive from all the flats is I'm just about as good as changing up the tubes as the bike mechanic at Creek is! :thumbsup:
 

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If you're running tubes and getting pinch flats it's a PSI issue more often than not.
PSI needs to go up a bit.
If it's objects penetrating the tire, then going tubeless is your best remedy.

Either way, consider going tubeless and running a true DH or "enduro" casing.
Maxxis calls it Double Down, Schwalbe calls it Super Gravity.

If you're sticking with tubes, then the solution is higher PSI and burlier tires.
 

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Tubes are a mistake. Full stop.


Now that we're running tubeless, gotta consider the tire casing. It's tempting to run single ply nonsense, and they're light, but they're super bouncy once you get them up to a reasonable pressure where they don't bottom or fold over. Far more sensible to run heavier tires. It's up to you to determine how much tire you need to run to have non-bouncy tires that don't whack the rims, but keep in mind that it's easier to feel heavy tires at the beginning of a ride than at the end.


My big bike sees more mtb vacations than it does local trails, so i always have to reevaluate my tire pressures/choices when i ride it.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Well, barring moving to tubeless, sounds like ramping up the PSI the next time I head over to the bike park is my best bet. Unfortunately, I can't go tubeless with the tires I've got as they have far too many little holes and cuts to support the sealant (I think..). Next year I'm probably going to invest in new tires - the Maxxis Minion DHF/DHR combo. Those look like they're for pretty gnarly stuff and have the double ply casing.
 

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I used to flat 3-6 times a year

since going tubeless...no more flats.

I ride the same or worse (harder on tires) than before...just not flats

[I still always carry a tube just in case, but haven't needed it]
 

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Discussion Starter #7
With the tubeless valves in, is it a pain to install a tube if you do manage to flat?

I hear the tubeless crowd loud and clear, I don't want to invest in new tires with just a few weeks left of riding for me before school starts up again. I do have rim tape and the tubeless valves already, just need sealant and new tires and I'll be good to go.
 

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15 years of DH, 250lbs +, 30psi, DH tires and DH tubes- 2 flats. The tires are the issue, not the tubes. Tubeless is great if you like tires rolling off of rims and having to fill them up every ride. Again, it's the XC tires that are your issue. Ttyl, Fahn
 

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The tires are the issue, not the tubes.
I agree.

Unfortunately, I can't go tubeless with the tires I've got as they have far too many little holes and cuts to support the sealant (I think..). Next year I'm probably going to invest in new tires
When I was using tubes I always knew when it was time for a new tire when I started getting lots of flats. I don't know what tires you're using but no matter what they are they're way more susceptible to flatting when they start getting thin and cut up.

I do think tubeless is best for all around trail riding but I wouldn't know about downhill specific stuff.
 

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Elitest thrill junkie
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Tubes are a mistake. Full stop.


Now that we're running tubeless, gotta consider the tire casing. It's tempting to run single ply nonsense, and they're light, but they're super bouncy once you get them up to a reasonable pressure where they don't bottom or fold over. Far more sensible to run heavier tires. It's up to you to determine how much tire you need to run to have non-bouncy tires that don't whack the rims, but keep in mind that it's easier to feel heavy tires at the beginning of a ride than at the end.


My big bike sees more mtb vacations than it does local trails, so i always have to reevaluate my tire pressures/choices when i ride it.
Yep, if you are bringing your enduro bike to the bike park, it's worth it to have a set of DH rubber tires (maxxis minions, might as well go for the best) to switch out for those DH days.

I remember renting a DH bike at keystone that came with a 2.3" rear maxxis highroller or something and tubes. With normal pressure, above what most run, I would flat launching into a certain rock garden no matter what I did. I tried it several times (and brought it back down the mountain for them to fix), but it simply didn't work. The tire was too skinny without enough volume for that kind of riding and the tube was a weak point. Not everyone needs wider than 2.3" tires, but this was a pretty nasty section and at those speeds on a full on DH bike, I'd go with a slightly wider tire and tubeless. I'm certain it would have been fine given my experience DHing in many other places, including solid rock at South Mountain and Bootleg.
 

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I have been riding DH for 20 years. I have had two flats in the last 15 years. The key is real dh tires, real dh tubes and a min. of 25 pounds of pressure. Tubeless works well but after a few months in real DH Hcore stuff, they burp and leak.
 

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J:
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Get a pressure gauge and use it, simple. Just look at the weight/casing thickness spec before purchasing next...you want at least 1,000g bare minimum...don't pay any attention to the tire name for toughness...a lot of times a legacy name is a lame moniker used to sell junk

Here's an example of the "easiest tires to tear apart" in history= 2.3" Maxxis Minion DHF & DHR (DownHill Front & DownHill Rear @ 700g each), naming a product downhill doesn't mean d!ck :nono:
 

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Get a pressure gauge and use it, simple. Just look at the weight/casing thickness spec before purchasing next...you want at least 1,000g bare minimum...don't pay any attention to the tire name for toughness...a lot of times a legacy name is a lame moniker used to sell junk

Here's an example of the "easiest tires to tear apart" in history= 2.3" Maxxis Minion DHF & DHR (DownHill Front & DownHill Rear @ 700g each), naming a product downhill doesn't mean d!ck :nono:
Not sure if the 2.3s are made completely different but this is totally the opposite of what I've experienced with my Minion 2.5s and Highroller II 2.4s -- they outlast every other tire I've tried and generally perform better too. Conversely, I had a Scwhalbe Magic Mary on the front for a while in which the cornering lugs started to tear off after one ride and the tire became dangerous after just a few weeks of use. Never buying one of those again.

Anyhow-- as others have said here, the tires and/or pressure is the issue here, not tubeless vs. tubes. I've been running tubes forever and I rarely get pinch flats at 26-28 psi. Used to go full seasons of DH at Big Sky-- the home of axe-shaped rocks, without ever getting a flat running DH casing 2.5s and moderate pressure with DH tubes.

I ran ghetto tubeless for a while and had my front tire blow off the rim instantly in a high speed corner-- sending me to the ground hard. I don't doubt that real tubeless is a great move but it'll cost ya.
 

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J:
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The indonesian rubber (schwaby) is like air puffed whipped cream compared to the taiwan treadz...when comparing tire weights/sizes, just look at the specs and use logic
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Thanks for all the information (and keep it coming!). So right now I've got Maxxis High Roller IIs 2.4" on my bike, they came with the bike when I bought it. They've got around 500 miles on them, and the majority of those were in real rocky New England trail riding. I definitely will say I've been lazy about the PSI..I rely on a hand pump I've got and there's no gauge. I'll have to be better about checking that in the future. When I go to the bike park on Tuesday I'll make sure there's 30 up front, 32-34 out back.

Also, and I guess I should've mentioned this earlier..I'm in college so my budget for buying new things for my bike is pretty limited, hence not wanting to go tubeless this year. Changing the PSI that I run is definitely the easiest and cheapest option. After that, I'll probbly pick up Minion DHF/Rs for next year when going to a park..

Thanks again for all the replies!
 

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...

I remember renting a DH bike at keystone that came with a 2.3" rear maxxis highroller or something and tubes. With normal pressure, above what most run, I would flat launching into a certain rock garden no matter what I did. I tried it several times (and brought it back down the mountain for them to fix), but it simply didn't work. The tire was too skinny without enough volume for that kind of riding and the tube was a weak point. Not everyone needs wider than 2.3" tires, but this was a pretty nasty section and at those speeds on a full on DH bike, I'd go with a slightly wider tire and tubeless.
Jayem - was this bike's suspension set up well? I've ridden the Trestle demo bikes a few times, had such a bad experience with terrible suspension, stiction you wouldn't believe, poorly set up, etc that I don't use them any more (and bad brakes too). Got tired of wasting dh time at the shop to attempt more adjustments of equipment that likely needed to be rebuilt or replaced. I actually do better with my 429trail at Winter Park than I did with their bikes.

I suppose my $.02 is properly set up suspension is huge, and maybe this is a reason why many of you report very different experiences with tubes and tubeless?


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