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Discussion Starter #1
Partial Noob here again. :) Switching from clipless to flats and am wondering about a good shoe. I guess something like a 510 would be fine. My concerns are

1 )Something that is good for hike-a-biking up long hills, possibly in wet mud slick conditions, but more so probably dry dirt.

2 )The lightest weight possible ! This is huge factor as I am planning another long xc endurance ride.

3) probably a stiff sole, stiff midsole. Not sure. a mid top type thing maybe.

Basically need a lightweight hiking shoe, that doubles as a good mtn bike shoe. any suggestions.
 

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510s cost too much for basically a skate shoe with an abnormally soft bottom (wooptie doo).

Probably not a popular choice here on mtbr but If you run a platforms with toe clips, you can basically run any one of your favorite hiking shoes and it doesn't really matter. I run MG1s with Forte toe-clips loose enough to allow me to still quickly dab my foot on the ground when necessary but ensures I don't get any dreaded slip & shin gouges. :thumbsup: Having your favorite boots means you're also well equipped when you're forced to dismount and have to hike for a while (i tend to ride where I'm not suppose to :p ).
 

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Fat-tired Roadie
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At risk of being "that guy"

Are you sure you want to switch? Or, are you sure you want to switch and stay switched for long rides and your event?

I think the difference in efficiency is overstated, but six hours later, small differences start to really add up. Unless your event is on a course that's quite technical (and I know they vary a ton,) and the clipless pedals are actively messing you up I think you may be better off sticking with clipless once you start really loading on the volume and for your event. I did a few weeks in flat pedals a while ago and I think they helped me handle my bike more efficiently, and I'm probably going to do that again shortly. So don't think I'm dumping on flat pedals in general. I just think that when the hours really stack up, clipless pedals are a better tool.

If the flat pedals are just a training tool, it frees you not to stress out about the weight of the shoes, or sacrifice what they do for you on the bike so that you can walk faster.
 

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my shoes came in the mail today after i got home from my ride. they feel pretty light. the bottoms of the shoes are stiff so there is a lot of power transfer into the pedals. cant wait to try them out next time i ride.

i also have MG1 pedals.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
"Are you sure you want to switch? Or, are you sure you want to switch and stay switched for long rides and your event?"

Well right now and for my last endurance ride I have CB acid pedals combined with Lake shoes. (the very light lakes with the cobra system- cant remember the model##name) You know I really did like this setup. Light and easy clipping in and out, and also SORTa doubled as a flat pedal, but not big enough surface to really be great to just step and go, and slick to boot. The shoes were actually good for walking and hiking over stuff also. The clipless effect is great too for long grinds up fireroads and that sort of thing and Yeah I am concerned that going flat pedal how that would be after 10 hours of pedalling.

But at the same time I was really getting sick of clipping and unclipping and the time to clip in, even if it was just a split second, when your as exhausted as I was near the end, all I wanted to do was step down and not fool with being perfectly aligned.etc.

So that is why I came to the conclusion that just flat pedals would be the ticket. But yes the draw back of not being clipped in on long hauls that arent technical does concern me.

I guess if flats did not hinder me on long pedals and efficiency there, or worse cause some sort of squishy sole bent foot pain after 8 hours, then I would be okay, and I guess the only way to find out is to try it.

Then again I had a second thought, why not the two sided pedals, flat on one side and clip in ability on the other. What are the options there?

teva pinners huh? Im gonna google them now : )
 

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I currently run a set of MG-1 ti pedals in conjunction with a pair of 510 freeriders and they are a super grippy combo, that allow for a lot of control, but also allow you to bail quick if need be! I have used this set up for everything from 20 mile rides with over 4000 feet of climbing elevation to super technical downhills, off 10-12 foot drops to transtions, jump parks and more.

also the freeriders are nice because they have a stiff sole, good toe protecion and are comfortable for walking in.

I would be carefull of toe clips, I used to ride these a long time ago and once you become more advanced they become quite dangerous. I once broke a bone in my foot as it got stuck in the cage after hitting a tree and going over the bars!
 

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I too love the 5.10's. I have the Freeriders, bought a pair for my wife, brother, and riding buddy.
Very firm dole, great grip, and they are holding up well so far. Only had them a few months...
 

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my shoes came in the mail today after i got home from my ride. they feel pretty light. the bottoms of the shoes are stiff so there is a lot of power transfer into the pedals. cant wait to try them out next time i ride.

i also have MG1 pedals.
This is the same combo I moved to earlier this year when choosing to move from clipless to flats on my AM bike.

For the OP, I might suggest hanging on to your current clipless set up for the long XC rides. Also, I wouldn't think that most skate type shoes would not fair well in muddy/slick conditions if you need to hike-a-bike (although I have no experience at this). There is not a lot of biting tread on these type of shoes like regular mtb shoes. There's a reason why flats have pins. I like to use my flats on tech rides and clipless on the lndurance XC type rides.
 

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The pins on my mg1's really catch into the tread of my shoe. Very very very grippy! these shoes are great. I'll do a real trail ride tomorrow and test them further. Teva pinner $60 on amazon.
 

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Fat-tired Roadie
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I feel like there has to be more to this than I've read. OP - how long have you been mountain biking? How many endurance races have you done? What format? When's your next event? What kind of bike are/drivetrain are you using?

I ask because while I've only done a couple myself, and much shorter than 10 hours, improving my ability to walk is not something I see effecting my times.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Okay I had analysis paralysis trying to figure this out, but I'm BACK, with new found wisdom and understanding. :madmax:

Well to answer your question, my race is ORAMM, in which last year was my first attempt with not much real mtn biking to speak of beforehand. I dropped out of the race only a couple of miles from the finish with full body cramps, severe nausea, in the fetal positon, crying for my momma. - I lost 12 lbs and was sick for five days following :)

Now so you understand, I road bike ALOT, accomplished the road assualt on mt mitchell and bridge to bridge at 7 hours. I also completed several triathlons including a half ironman in 90 degree heat and actually won a first place novice division in a local sprint tri.

I am tellin you this as an indicator and a warning to all....never attempt to do ORAMM :eek:, Anyway, The thing i was not prepared for at ORAMM was the other muscle groups that were involved and intense focus necessary.

I have figured out that I am good with clipless for everything, except going downhill over anything gnarly. Several times my quote was "oh hell no" as i dismount and walked down over treacherous looking spots. lost alot of time doing this. I think with flat pedals I would have least possibly given a few of them a try.

The two sided pedal idea seemed okay until I realized they hang flat side down. The crank brothers 50/50 flat/clip deal seems like a possiblity..

Those 26's are very nice, pricey though. This year I am on a budget. I am seriously considering this MG1 and either the freerides or the Teva ..something
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I meant the Crank Brothers Mallets, Large platform but with the ability to clip in.

I have the Lake MX 330's and I have no complaints about them, comfortable and lightweight.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
With the candy or acid pedals , you may as well just have an eggbeater because there really is no flat pedalling to it, even though it appears there may be-- as slick and small as their "flat pedal" surface is.
 

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Fat-tired Roadie
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I made the decision to try to do my endurance rides off-road when I was getting ready for my race last season. I'm glad I did.

I also learned from an earlier, shorter race that I have to pay attention to nutrition on a long MTB ride in a different way from on a road ride. I can't just stick a power bar in my back pocket.

I think if you try to do a lot more mountain biking, you'll be better prepared for a mountain bike race. ;) It also gives you an opportunity to figure out what kind of sports drink you tolerate, and if you need to water it down. I do. And, how much you can eat, and what. For me, it's different from what I do on a road ride. Not hugely, but enough that I can (and did) mess myself up if I try to do things the same way.

A lot of competitive mountain bikers were BMX kids, and most of them have several seasons on you. So it might not be in the cards for you to be as technical a rider as the competition this year. But you can close a lot of that gap in a season.

Get the flat pedals. They're a great training tool, and maybe you'll decide I'm wrong when your race rolls around. Equipment aside, though, you've clearly identified two limiters that you can fix - bike handling and pacing/nutrition on the bike.

Good luck! (Now you HAVE to post after the event.)
 

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Partial Noob here again. :) Switching from clipless to flats and am wondering about a good shoe. I guess something like a 510 would be fine. My concerns are

1 )Something that is good for hike-a-biking up long hills, possibly in wet mud slick conditions, but more so probably dry dirt.
I can't think of any shoe built for flats that would work in slick conditions.
I've been running TEVA Links since just after they came out (still have not washed they yet and they still don't stink! Or else I'm getting used to the smell :p).

I can tell you that any flat-soled shoe is not going to get you up any slippery slope well at all, and even on flat ground they have no traction.

I ride all year round so I definitely see my share of water, mud, and other poor traction conditions.

How about a pair of Keens? Mine don't seem too heavy, they have good tread for hiking, and stiff enough to ride in.
I haven't used them on my mtb though.. just my SS around town.
 
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