Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
boba
Joined
·
133 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There may be previous postings on this. This winter, there is quite a bit of Snow on Vancouver Island trails, and my 545 Shimano Clipless pedals are usless when jammed with ice and snow..I thought it might be a good time to learn to ride with Flats. I am looking for light, thin pedals, Any suggestions? I saw some advertised some time ago that were thinner than the axel, but what are you using?

bob, Comox.
 

·
Mojo0115
Joined
·
1,667 Posts
I absolutely love my Easton Flatboy Pedals on my DH bike but they are not as thin as some other options. (and as a result I am thinking to try something different now I am on my M6 as it has a really low BB and I was getting quite a few pedal strikes while at Bootleg Canyon recently).

Flatboys are Weight: 572 grams
I have heard good things about the Deity pedals from the guys at the shop I use and it has a thinner profile as well.

Deity Decoy pedals
# Super thin 17mm profile
# Concave design for exceptional grip
# DU Bushing and DOuble Micro-Sealed Bearing system
# Extruded and CNC machined from 6061 T6 aluminum
# 10 fully adjustable traction pins
# Stepped Cro-Mo axle
# Service pedals without removing from the bike
# Only 430grams (pair)
 

·
Reviewer/Tester
Joined
·
6,176 Posts
Ebay, MG-1's magnesium platform. Cheap, fairly light, bombproof, and if you want really light, the Ti spindle set. Good traction pins, tough, last a long time. Eat shins for breakfast... :D

Rainman.

bobAustin said:
There may be previous postings on this. This winter, there is quite a bit of Snow on Vancouver Island trails, and my 545 Shimano Clipless pedals are usless when jammed with ice and snow..I thought it might be a good time to learn to ride with Flats. I am looking for light, thin pedals, Any suggestions? I saw some advertised some time ago that were thinner than the axel, but what are you using?

bob, Comox.
 

·
Raupe Nimmersatt
Joined
·
63 Posts
When I was out in the woods today, I found several huge ice blocks, which mostly were from small creeks, covering the trails. It´s been really cold recently and they must have frozen over during the last week or so. I was lucky to spot them in some cases because they were also covered with a thin layer of snow. That´s one thing where I´m really glad to have flat pedals. Guess if you hit them unprepared with just enough speed it can carry you off the track quite far.

So, here we go again:
NC-17 Sudpin III S-Pro Pedale - can´t say anything about them yet, but they´re also reasonably light @ ~385g and they´re available in different colors.

Greetings
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
557 Posts
Rainman said:
Ebay, MG-1's magnesium platform. Cheap, fairly light, bombproof, and if you want really light, the Ti spindle set. Good traction pins, tough, last a long time. Eat shins for breakfast... :D

Rainman.
What he said :)
Mine do not have ti spindles (yet) but they are light, 375g..

These pedals are large, which makes them feel nice, however some car is needed when riding in small spaces!

I use 5.10 shoes, which stick to them like glue. :thumbsup:

Advice on finding some ti spindles would be much appreciated..
 

·
I AM I AM
Joined
·
2,222 Posts
I ride DMR V12 Mags, not the lightest but I really like the shape and they grip well even without 5.10 shoes, they aren't as low profile as others either though.

For bling and flat I'd look at the range from TwentySix,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
320 Posts
Lets try this again.

Hi Bob
When I rode with you at Comox I was on a pair of Axiom's. They are a little heavier than some of the thinner pedals but I like that the pin size is not so small. On previous cheaper pedals I broke pins too easy. The Axiom's cost $100.00 at our LBS.

straw
 

·
Reviewer/Tester
Joined
·
6,176 Posts
Ebay, usually the same seller has the Ti spindle option in the MG1's.
I picked up three pairs some time ago, and have only used one set in three years of riding so far.
They are a steal [$25] in the standard spindle format, and the Ti format will usually go for around $80. Still pretty cheap with the Ti setup.

Rainman.

robbieracer said:
What he said :)
Mine do not have ti spindles (yet) but they are light, 375g..

These pedals are large, which makes them feel nice, however some care is needed when riding in small spaces!

I use 5.10 shoes, which stick to them like glue. :thumbsup:

Advice on finding some ti spindles would be much appreciated..
 

·
boba
Joined
·
133 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
decision

Thx. for the input..I will go with the MG pedals and pick them us this morning...made by Welgo..they are magnesium, slightly concave, 375 grams, while thin, they 1/4 inch thicker than the thinnest available here, but 1/3 of a lb. lighter. The mechanic as the local shop uses them. And, they locally available....for a reasonable price.

thanks agin.
bob
 

·
boba
Joined
·
133 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Flats...first ride.....conclusions

Well, I just spent an hour+ in what we call the N/E woods....lots of logs, roots, some uphill.....a reasonably technical ride. I bought MG 1 pedals...a Wellgo Magnesium lower profile pedal of 375 grams for those of you who care. By the way, they are lighter than the M545 Shimano clipless that I use which are 550 grams. The shoes are the extremely high rated 5-10 shoes...see reviews on MTBR. I got the high ankle shoe for support, warmth and protection.

The pedals stick to the shoes so well, it was almost like riding clipless. I went over everything just great. The shoes are so good you feel like you are glued to the pedals. All the big logs that I usually ride, I was able to go over just fine on my first ride.

Conclusion...I think adjusting to flats will be easy but the shoes are the key. I also ride a trials motorcycle and in thinking about it, I go up and down and over stuff on it that I would never attempt if I was clipped into it.

bob, comox.
 

·
Mojo0115
Joined
·
1,667 Posts
bobAustin said:
Well, I just spent an hour+ in what we call the N/E woods....lots of logs, roots, some uphill.....a reasonably technical ride. I bought MG 1 pedals...a Wellgo Magnesium lower profile pedal of 375 grams for those of you who care. By the way, they are lighter than the M545 Shimano clipless that I use which are 550 grams. The shoes are the extremely high rated 5-10 shoes...see reviews on MTBR. I got the high ankle shoe for support, warmth and protection.

The pedals stick to the shoes so well, it was almost like riding clipless. I went over everything just great. The shoes are so good you feel like you are glued to the pedals. All the big logs that I usually ride, I was able to go over just fine on my first ride.

Conclusion...I think adjusting to flats will be easy but the shoes are the key. I also ride a trials motorcycle and in thinking about it, I go up and down and over stuff on it that I would never attempt if I was clipped into it.

bob, comox.
The hardest thing for me with flats was getting used to not having an upstroke as you pedal/lunge up technical obstacles.
 

·
boba
Joined
·
133 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Upstroke...so what do you do when lunging over big stuff?

Hi Sean....One of my friends,,,,you may remember him...Steve Hoerburger ....a little guy with little hair...rides flats very well and practices quite a bit. He has got good at angling his feet to lift the bike as he lunges over really big stuff.ie 3 foot logs....I found today that I was able to unweight the back of the bike over logs that were on an angle and quite slippery and got over them without any fuss. I think that if I practice, I could carry the bike with me like he does in time..

The good news is that the snow is melting fast and Cumberland and parts of the Lake should be rideable in a week if Vancouver Island continues to live up to its name: Calafornia North.

The bad news is that my situation is the same as yours...if I like the flats and shoes..., Jane will want the same thing too.

bob
 

·
I AM I AM
Joined
·
2,222 Posts
Great to hear you got them and you're loving it by the sounds!!

It's quite funny I reckon I fell off more often and needed knee / leg protection more so when I was riding clipless compared to now that I'm on flats.
 

·
Reviewer/Tester
Joined
·
6,176 Posts
I've been pushing riders towards platform pedals and 5-10 Impact shoes for a long time. I know how good this combination is from long experience.
As far as pulling up on the backstroke goes, it's all technique. You can get a lot of "pull-up" with the MG-1's and 5-10's if you imagine that you are trying to scrape some sticky bubblegum from the bottom of your shoe on the upstroke. You don't lift up like with clipless, you "scrape back" with platforms.
The super sticky sole of the 5-10's will stick to your traction pins like glue, and with this proper technique you will be amazed at just how much pull you can get with platforms.
All you have to do is to remember this.... "scrape back, don't lift". Point your toe down on the back stroke pedal and scrape it. The shoes will grip the pins, and you will gain extra power from the up stroke.
After a while, it just becomes a natural movement, you won't even think about it.
5-10's and traction pins make it work... :thumbsup:


Rainman.
 

·
Mojo0115
Joined
·
1,667 Posts
bobAustin said:
The bad news is that my situation is the same as yours...if I like the flats and shoes..., Jane will want the same thing too.

bob
Heh, truth.

We actually had the opposite happen recently. Amber decided to try out some Crank Brother Acid pedals we picked up as a swag over the summer and became such a fan of them I decided to try them on my Mojo as well. She got herself some Mallets for her Downhill bike and I have followed suite as well. (although I am still pretty sold on flats for my DH bike in gnarly terrain I do prefer being clipped in for races themselves - just for the extra control as you go bouncing through rough sections at high speed).
 

·
half tread will travel
Joined
·
240 Posts
"All you have to do is to remember this.... "scrape back, don't lift". Point your toe down on the back stroke pedal and scrape it. The shoes will grip the pins, and you will gain extra power from the up stroke."

I second this technique as rainman suggests...also it will help to place your foot in the middle of the pedals as apposed to the ball of your foot...this makes the down stroke more powerful and your toes will drop naturally for lifting...works like a charm...good luck...
 

·
Mojo0115
Joined
·
1,667 Posts
Tread Mark said:
"All you have to do is to remember this.... "scrape back, don't lift". Point your toe down on the back stroke pedal and scrape it. The shoes will grip the pins, and you will gain extra power from the up stroke."

I second this technique as rainman suggests...also it will help to place your foot in the middle of the pedals as apposed to the ball of your foot...this makes the down stroke more powerful and your toes will drop naturally for lifting...works like a charm...good luck...
This is one of my biggest issues with Flats is that you end up on the middle of foot instead of the ball of the foot a lot of time compared to clipped in.

Ball of the foot gives you more "body suspension" compared to flat footed. (sorta like landing from a jump in the air on your heels rather than the ball of the foot.
 

·
half tread will travel
Joined
·
240 Posts
zzsean said:
This is one of my biggest issues with Flats is that you end up on the middle of foot instead of the ball of the foot a lot of time compared to clipped in.

Ball of the foot gives you more "body suspension" compared to flat footed. (sorta like landing from a jump in the air on your heels rather than the ball of the foot.
i use clips for road riding and tried them for mountain bike when they first came out...basically i been in flats for most of my 28 years of mountain biking and love them...good luck...
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top