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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My Spicer Track Bike is going to be here tomorrow. Its got a flip/flop freewheel and fixed. Yes I know there are people out there that like the "fixed" approach for the road. But I'm not a roadie, I'm a MTB'er at the core who just started commuting, and I don't know about the whole "pedals moving over obstacles" thing.

Just want some random Two Cents from you guys, knowledgible, smart crowd.
 

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Take your time learning how to get over things. You will learn that as you approach an obstacle you can "tack" like a sailboat to get you pedals in sync with where they need to be to clear it. A little twitch of the front wheel will change where your pedals will be when you go over it. It will become second nature after awhile.
That said, you will find yourself in situations when you have no time to react. You just have to hunker down and let your momentum take you over and hope for the best as your pedals smash away.
 

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Learn to wheelie leading with either foot, how to unweight the back wheel while pedaling, and how to at least approximate a bunnyhop. All of these skills are best learned in the backyard with a couple of 2 x 4s acting as obstacles that won't throw you to the ground while you're getting the hang of it.
 

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If you are commuting don't worry about it, but do run a front brake. Don't stop pedaling, you'll see what I mean the first time you try to coast. It won't take long to get used to it and then you'll enjoy the feeling.

Fixed mountainbiking is fun and really no problem on most trails, give it a try.
 

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I like wheelies
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Don't run too big a gear. I spent the winter on a fixed, running 42x16. It was a perfect gear for enjoying the spin which a fixed promotes, and I was still able to do group rides with all my buddies on their geared bikes. Lugging a big gear will take away lot of the benefit and fun of riding fixed. If hills are part of your route, though, be sure the gear is big enough to let you go down w/o losing control of the pedals and unscrewing your hips.

Spending quality time on a fixed will improve your pedaling like nothing else can.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
A lot of good advice, for a new apprentice. And the commute is easy, just the damn cars I have to dodge is the only obstacles. I just got it tonight, that thing is Built for speed! I might have found my new adrenaline rush. I wapped it over to freewheel, after riding fixed. I want to get a feel for the bike first. Then I'll run fixed.

Thanks Guys
 

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It'll ride a bit differently fixed. Not that the bike changes all that much, but the weight shifts are a lot different on a fixed than free. It changes the feel slightly. I'm just sayin', you might as well go fixed as soon as you can.
 

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I ride a Surly Stemroller fixed w/o brakes, flat bars and cyclocross tires - about a 28 mi. round trip commute. Best suggestion is to plan way ahead; turns, stops, etc. & know where the dogs are... I think it is better just to start out fixed because the basics and your riding strategy will definitely change from riding it free. Planning ahead, being able to wheelie, hop etc with either foot leading will take some time but does become important. If you try to coast, it will quickly remind you that you can't. I have found stopping is quicker off the saddle - you have your weight and not just back pressure - also helps take some of the load off the knees. My commute is gravel and paved country roads; low rollers and a few hills, so depending upon time of year, I run a 48 x 16 (Spring & Summer), and a 42 x 16 for the colder months & early season training. Have fun - it is simple & sweet to run fixed.
 

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Riding for Sanity said:
My Spicer Track Bike is going to be here tomorrow. Its got a flip/flop freewheel and fixed. Yes I know there are people out there that like the "fixed" approach for the road. But I'm not a roadie, I'm a MTB'er at the core who just started commuting, and I don't know about the whole "pedals moving over obstacles" thing.

Just want some random Two Cents from you guys, knowledgible, smart crowd.
I got my fixie built a few months ago. So I am just a little ahead of you on the learning curve.

I enjoy the crap out of it.

What I have learned....
--I would not ride without a front brake
--You will try to coast, once.
--It will give you a good workout (compared to the same distance with a freewheel)
--Riding downhill looses ALL of its fun, real fast.
--Your riding becomes very fluid.

I hedged my bet and bought a flip-flop hub (fixed/free). I regret getting the freewheel, I will never use it.
 

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Fast Eddy said:
What 'cha gonna do when the chain snaps as you're rolling up to a red light at a busy intersection? I mean, right before you get run over. Soil yourself maybe?
I always like to have two independent braking systems but thats not why I run brakes with my fixed. Its because in most conditions I can stop much faster with my front brake than with a rear. I recommend definately keeping atleast your front brake.

Craig
 

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I once popped a chain going down a long hill on a brakeless fixie (road), I stuck my right shoe between the seat tube and rear tire and jammed it against the tire as hard as I could to stop. Quite effective, but there was a rut burned into the heel of my shoe and little bits of shoe rubber sprayed all over the bike.
 

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One of the fun parts of riding fixed on the road is starting to spin faster than your legs can manage on downhills, then hitting a bump. Doesn't take much of a bump to cause you to lose what little control over your spin that you had and put the slightest bit of back pressure on the pedals. This tiny bit of back pressure, combined with the bump, can cause your rear wheel to skip sideways. At 30mph that's a real adrenaline rush.
 

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Fast Eddy said:
What 'cha gonna do when the chain snaps as you're rolling up to a red light at a busy intersection? I mean, right before you get run over. Soil yourself maybe?
why is it when ever someone doesnt run brakes, people on this forum give em such a hard time? does it affect you in any way? serious question.
 
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