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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
how do you fix a small puncture leak in tubeless tire?
What kind of sealant is strong enough to seal the leak?

I hate to insert a tube inside tubeless tire since it adds alot of weight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
RoyDean said:
I use automotive tire patches. They're heavy, but better than buying another $40 tire.
holly smokes. are you kidding me? those patches must weight 30-50gms each.
 

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Once in a while, MBA comes in handy:

http://www.mbaction.com/ME2/dirmod....d=&tier=4&id=F5952208F9944FFFBFEEEA049EEB65FA

The only drawback is getting the tire buffer, and working with it -- not all auto stores carry it, and you need gloves. But the method described here works great. I don't know about those Hutchinson patches -- if they can permanently adhere to the slick rubber inside a tire. Maybe they solved that issue, I have no personal experience.
 

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I bought some tire plugs recently, I have not used them but there just like the Car tire plugs but smaller. I also read about people using crazy glue.
 

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On the trail i use superglue, wet the area, apply a drop, wait 3 minute, pump'n go.

At home i just use a regular tire patch. I've used tire buffer with a heat gun, clamp, and about 3 different glues and patches. Cleaning with a wet rag and a regular bike inner tube patch works just as well. Except for 1/2" sidewall gash, which an automotive patch was able to seal and hold but I rode it maybe 100 yds down the street and then chucked the tire.
 

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I use this method not only for tires but for patching holes in Dry Suits intended for HazMat and rescue diving.
Any old piece of vulcanized rubber will do... piece of an inner tube is prolly the cheapest and most readily available.
Roughen both the patching material and the spot you're patching with some sandpaper or better yet a Dremel-type rototool with a conical bit.
Make sure all surfaces are clean. Not just shop clean but surgically clean. Rubbing alcohol clean.
Apply a coat of rubber cement (the kind that comes in patch kits... something with a Haptane base preferably) to both the patch and the tire. Let dry 5 minutes.
Repeat the glue application 3 times with 5 minutes between each.
After the last drying cycle apply the patch and firmly apply pressure. Let this cure for... an hour? As long as you can?

Voila! Good as.... well, good enough anyway. Sealant alone will take care of holes from a pinprick to 1/4 inch (theoretically) but in the case of bigger gashes might only be enough just to get you home and run a high risk of failure once loaded to normal pressures. Also, gashes that sever a large number of the threads in the tire casing should be considered catastrophic and should not be considered candidates for the above procedure.
 
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