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I'm more of a dog person
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
No, they don't exist. not yet anyway? was watching some videos on Five Ten's website last night about all the different proprietary rubbers that they make and how they are all off the charts in grip and impact absorption. Got me thinking about other things that use rubber for grip - like tires. Anyone else ever think about how awesome of a tire they could make using their Stealth rubber? Or maybe even a new compound developed by Five Ten specifically for mtb tires? After watching all the vids, it's obvious that anytime they have been presented with a challenge of developing a new rubber compound for a specific application, they create something revolutionary. If they were interested, I'm sure they could develop a tire that would dominate the market and revolutionize mtb tires, much like some of their footwear has. just sayin'.
 

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unclekittykiller said:
No, they don't exist. not yet anyway? was watching some videos on Five Ten's website last night about all the different proprietary rubbers that they make and how they are all off the charts in grip and impact absorption. Got me thinking about other things that use rubber for grip - like tires. Anyone else ever think about how awesome of a tire they could make using their Stealth rubber? Or maybe even a new compound developed by Five Ten specifically for mtb tires? After watching all the vids, it's obvious that anytime they have been presented with a challenge of developing a new rubber compound for a specific application, they create something revolutionary. If they were interested, I'm sure they could develop a tire that would dominate the market and revolutionize mtb tires, much like some of their footwear has. just sayin'.
You are only 10 years too late.

Intense tires have used versions of Five-Ten "Stealth" rubber for years. The other "soft" compounds used in bicycle tires are similar and maybe better for the purpose.

Also should be aware that the "soft" Stealth compounds used for shoes are in the 70-80A durometer range, which is considered "hard" for bike tires. The "soft" tire rubber compounds are generally in the 40-50A range and even medium-hard XC tires use 60-65A compounds.
 

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I'm more of a dog person
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I didn't realize Intense used Stealth. I've never tried their tires. Kinda pops my bubble there though. I haven't seen any Intense domination in mtb tires either so I guess that whole thing hasn't worked out as well as I had fantasized. so much for that. :sad:
 

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Learn something new every day, had no idea fiveten had developed climbing shoes until your post made me curious to look over there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Bikinfoolferlife said:
Learn something new every day, had no idea fiveten had developed climbing shoes until your post made me curious to look over there.
Yeah, I hear ya. Since I'm not a climber, I had never even heard of 5-10 until they made the Impact shoe. But apparently they pretty much set the standard for climbing shoes. At least that is what the owner is claiming.
 

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5.10 (pronounced five-ten 'cause climbers ain't so good at math) is a climbing rating that used to be considered pretty difficult. Thus 5.10 -->five tennies. They started making rubber to resole climbing shoes back in the eighties when climbers only had one good brand of climbing shoe, the Fire (pronounced fe-ray, man we ain't so good at reading either). Before five-tennies climbers were also known to cut out the rubber from old car race tires and glue them on their shoes for the sticky quality.

As Shiggy mentioned, climbing rubber is much harder than tire rubber, as it needs to "hold an edge" without flexing too much. As a result it would be terrible for a tire.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Johnnyboy said:
5.10 (pronounced five-ten 'cause climbers ain't so good at math) is a climbing rating that used to be considered pretty difficult. Thus 5.10 -->five tennies. They started making rubber to resole climbing shoes back in the eighties when climbers only had one good brand of climbing shoe, the Fire (pronounced fe-ray, man we ain't so good at reading either). Before five-tennies climbers were also known to cut out the rubber from old car race tires and glue them on their shoes for the sticky quality.

As Shiggy mentioned, climbing rubber is much harder than tire rubber, as it needs to "hold an edge" without flexing too much. As a result it would be terrible for a tire.
Cool, I was wondering what the origin of the name 5.10 was. I didn't know it was a climbing rating. The rest of what u explained was sumed up in the vids i watched.
Your last point about the durometer of the rubber making a terible tire was why I mentioned how it would be cool if they developed a new compound specifially for mtb tires instead of just using standard Stealth rubber. but if it's true what Shiggy is saying about Intense already using Stealth rubber, then I'm sure the compound has already been altered for mtb specific use.
 

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unclekittykiller said:
Your last point about the durometer of the rubber making a terible tire was why I mentioned how it would be cool if they developed a new compound specifially for mtb tires instead of just using standard Stealth rubber. but if it's true what Shiggy is saying about Intense already using Stealth rubber, then I'm sure the compound has already been altered for mtb specific use.
Though I have no idea whether Intense uses a variant of 5.10's Stealth rubber (Intense's own info just states they use natural rubber), I can say with certainty that the rubber of my Intense tires is much softer than that of the various 5.10 shoes I've owned over the years - including the 5.10 Impacts I have now.
 
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