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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Biking Brazilian,

Amen!

No, I'm not going alone. (What, am I crazy?!) I will be going with my husband and his buddy this Sunday. It's been years since my husband was there last time. And he is the kind of guy who will "just go ride it. If anything happens, just tough it out." His buddy was there recently, but he is not known to be the best navigator (if you are reading this, sorry for letting the secret out ;) ). That's why I want to do my own research and also I want to know what I'm getting into and what I need to prepare.

I'd love to do the route that Plim suggested. We'll see how it goes this weekend. Will report back.

Thanks everyone for the information. Also thank those who offered to take me up on your rides. You guys rock!!! :thumbsup:
 

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Kindler, Gentler Ride

mudworm said:
Biking Brazilian,

Amen!

No, I'm not going alone. (What, am I crazy?!) I will be going with my husband and his buddy this Sunday. It's been years since my husband was there last time. And he is the kind of guy who will "just go ride it. If anything happens, just tough it out." His buddy was there recently, but he is not known to be the best navigator (if you are reading this, sorry for letting the secret out ;) ). That's why I want to do my own research and also I want to know what I'm getting into and what I need to prepare.

I'd love to do the route that Plim suggested. We'll see how it goes this weekend. Will report back.

Thanks everyone for the information. Also thank those who offered to take me up on your rides. You guys rock!!! :thumbsup:
The ride proposed by Plim is about 6000' of climb. You can easily skip the first singletrack loop and knock off about 1000' of climbing by just continuing up Coit Rd. to Mahoney Meadows. I did this on my last ride with Plim just to keep pace and keep my climbing down to 5000'. You miss some nice singletrack, but it's brutal steep. And the fire road is a much nicer grade too.

What you need to do this just skip the indented parts and instead keep going on Coit Rd.

Start at Coyote Creek. This is two miles further down Gilroy Hot Springs Road past Hunting Hollow. No fee (nice), cuts out two road miles at beginning and end of the ride (good), but there is very limited parking (dang). If you don't get there early, you'll have to get creative with parking spots or just head back to Hunting Hollow.
Take Coit Road (fireroad). Starts just before and to the right of the bridge at the end of Gilroy Hot Springs Road.
Follow Coit Road until you hit Anza.
* Right on Anza.
* Right on Jackson.
* Left on Elderberry Spring.
* Left on Rock Tower.
* Left on Domino Pond.
* Straightish onto Cattle Duster.
* Continue straightish/leftish on Coit Spring.
* Right up a no-name trail (I think, might be Cross Canyon, don't remember if it's marked and if so what it's marked as) - the trail is very steep at first.
* Right on whatever trail is there when the previous trail ends; you'll just have to ride slightly uphill 100 yards or so before you hit Coit Road.
Left on Coit Road to intersection with Mahoney Meadows.
Take Mahoney Meadows.
......
 

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BigLarry said:
The ride proposed by Plim is about 6000' of climb. You can easily skip the first singletrack loop and knock off about 1000' of climbing by just continuing up Coit Rd. to Mahoney Meadows. I did this on my last ride with Plim just to keep pace and keep my climbing down to 5000'. You miss some nice singletrack, but it's brutal steep. And the fire road is a much nicer grade too.

What you need to do this just skip the indented parts and instead keep going on Coit Rd.

Start at Coyote Creek. This is two miles further down Gilroy Hot Springs Road past Hunting Hollow. No fee (nice), cuts out two road miles at beginning and end of the ride (good), but there is very limited parking (dang). If you don't get there early, you'll have to get creative with parking spots or just head back to Hunting Hollow.
Take Coit Road (fireroad). Starts just before and to the right of the bridge at the end of Gilroy Hot Springs Road.
Follow Coit Road until you hit Anza.
* Right on Anza.
* Right on Jackson.
* Left on Elderberry Spring.
* Left on Rock Tower.
* Left on Domino Pond.
* Straightish onto Cattle Duster.
* Continue straightish/leftish on Coit Spring.
* Right up a no-name trail (I think, might be Cross Canyon, don't remember if it's marked and if so what it's marked as) - the trail is very steep at first.
* Right on whatever trail is there when the previous trail ends; you'll just have to ride slightly uphill 100 yards or so before you hit Coit Road.
Left on Coit Road to intersection with Mahoney Meadows.
Take Mahoney Meadows.
Yeah, the route psmithm and I and a couple others rode on that hot weekend a few weeks back skipped the beginning singletrack and just followed Coit road all the way to Mahoney Meadows. It cuts off some mileage and climbing (some of it steep), and sadly also some nice singletrack, but on a hot day it was the right call.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Hi Plim,

I used the maps online to study your route. Wow, I'm amazed you remembered every turn -- there was not a missing link at all.

>Right up a no-name trail (I think, might be Cross Canyon, don't remember if it's marked and if so what it's marked as) - the trail is very steep at first.

According to this map, I think it is Grapevine Trail (upper section).

>Turn right on Creekside Trail. Hike-a-bike along the precarious "trail." It follows the creek, so you won't get lost. Watch for poison oak. This'll take you back to China Hole.

Is Creekside Trail the same thing as Juniper Trail in this map?

>Look for a trail to the left going uphill just before you get to China Hole. This'll cut out some crappy boulder climbs at the end of Creekside and put you on China Hole Trail.

That "shortcut" trail must be Narrows Trail then as shown in this map.

> Turn right at Cross Canyon Trail. In about a hundred yards, turn left on a trail without a name

Looks like Grapevine again according to this map.

>Another good ride that includes Middle Ridge but starts from HQ is this one: http://trail.motionbased.com/trail/activity/5199741

I like the look of this loop shown in a map -- it's pretty! Will have to see which route the boys want to do this time.
 

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mudworm said:
Hi Plim,

I used the maps online to study your route. Wow, I'm amazed you remembered every turn -- there was not a missing link at all.
I carry the big Coe map with me at all times. ;) Nah, I've sent that route out in response to this sort of question a number of times. Copy-paste. Easy-peasy.

mudworm said:
>Right up a no-name trail (I think, might be Cross Canyon, don't remember if it's marked and if so what it's marked as) - the trail is very steep at first.

According to this map, I think it is Grapevine Trail (upper section).
Could be, but when I think harder of this intersection, I think there might be a marker there and it's not Grapevine. Could be wrong.

Regardless of the name, on the map you linked it is indeed labeled as the upper portion of Grapevine.

mudworm said:
>Turn right on Creekside Trail. Hike-a-bike along the precarious "trail." It follows the creek, so you won't get lost. Watch for poison oak. This'll take you back to China Hole.

Is Creekside Trail the same thing as Juniper Trail in this map?
Yup. That's the one.

mudworm said:
>Look for a trail to the left going uphill just before you get to China Hole. This'll cut out some crappy boulder climbs at the end of Creekside and put you on China Hole Trail.

That "shortcut" trail must be Narrows Trail then as shown in this map.
It could be part of the Narrows, but I dunno. The little shortcut I'm talking about goes uphill maybe 50-75 yards from the stream to the China Hole Trail. The Narrows follows the stream from Los Cruzeros to China Hole.

You shouldn't travel very far at all on this trail before you hit the China Hole Trail. It's kind of hard to tell which tiny trail is the shortcut and which is just some random tiny trail that goes up a little ways and then peters out. Might be safer to just go all the way to China Hole and then head up the East side of China Hole trail (which you came down earlier in the route, so you should recognize it).

mudworm said:
> Turn right at Cross Canyon Trail. In about a hundred yards, turn left on a trail without a name

Looks like Grapevine again according to this map.
It's the same trail you took before, so if it was Grapevine then, good chance it's still Grapevine. ;) It is labeled Grapevine on the map you linked.

mudworm said:
>Another good ride that includes Middle Ridge but starts from HQ is this one: http://trail.motionbased.com/trail/activity/5199741

I like the look of this loop shown in a map -- it's pretty! Will have to see which route the boys want to do this time.
That other route has a bit more climbing per mile, is shorter, has more bike-pushing and will get further off the beaten path. So you'd be hiking up a hillside with no visible trail, for example. Don't do this if you're not in possession of a good map and navigation skills.

Both routes will be tiring and require endurance, especially on a hot day.

Do bring maps of some sort. The big official map is ideal. Printouts of the maps from Levey's site if that's all you got.

Have fun!
 

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Plim said:
Could be, but when I think harder of this intersection, I think there might be a marker there and it's not Grapevine. Could be wrong.

Regardless of the name, on the map you linked it is indeed labeled as the upper portion of Grapevine.

Have fun!
That trail is actually a part of Cross Canyon. Last time I was there I made a special point of looking because I recall seeing a map say it was Grapevine, and you guys always refer to it as "No Name Connector Trail". I was also starting to think we were poaching something.

So I was relieved and surprised to find out it is legal, and it is part of Cross Canyon.

I'm itchin to do this ride again. Maybe next weekend if it stays cool.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
It's officially weekend already. Not sure if anyone is still online. I'll try my luck.

Turn left on Poverty Flat road.
*right on Creekside Trail. Hike-a-bike along the precarious "trail."
*Look for a trail to the left going uphill. This'll put you on China Hole Trail.
*Retrace your steps up the East side of China Hole Trail.
Turn right on Mahoney Meadows Road.
Which of the following is a better alternative to the indented part on the way back after Middle Ridge Trail?
1) Cougar Tr -> China Hole down and up until it hits Mahoney Meadows Rd (technical single track and switchbacks?)
2) Poverty Flat Road -> Mahoney Meadows Rd (fire road all the way?)

Mainly, I just wanted to avoid the "precarious" creekside trail.
 

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mudworm said:
It's officially weekend already. Not sure if anyone is still online. I'll try my luck.

Which of the following is a better alternative to the indented part on the way back after Middle Ridge Trail?
1) Cougar Tr -> China Hole down and up until it hits Mahoney Meadows Rd (technical single track and switchbacks?)
2) Poverty Flat Road -> Mahoney Meadows Rd (fire road all the way?)

Mainly, I just wanted to avoid the "precarious" creekside trail.
Forget option 1, Couger Trail is an imaginary hike-a-bike trail straight up the steep mountain. Some are rumoured to have taken it - once - and never again.

Poverty Flat is a steep dirt road with lots of extra climbing, done sometimes by those with extra power and energy to spare.

I personally don't find the creekside trail all that bad. It's only a mile with only a couple short delicate sections 30' up on the bank. Most of it is a mosy along a creek through big rocks. You do need to cross the stream a couple times, and likely to get your feet wet if they weren't already in the stream crossings getting to Poverty Flat.

You need make the decision right at the start of the climb up the Poverty Flat fire road on the left side of the stream. You can go up the insane steep boring Poverty Flat road, or turn right across the creek for an adventure. Your choice. It's a typical Henry Coe option.

Either way, turn left at the bottom of Middle Ridge and follow along the creek for a ways to your decision point.
 

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BigLarry said:
Forget option 1, Couger Trail is an imaginary hike-a-bike trail straight up the steep mountain. Some are rumoured to have taken it - once - and never again.

Poverty Flat is a steep dirt road with lots of extra climbing, done sometimes by those with extra power and energy to spare.

I personally don't find the creekside trail all that bad. It's only a mile with only a couple short delicate sections 30' up on the bank. Most of it is a mosy along a creek through big rocks. You do need to cross the stream a couple times, and likely to get your feet wet if they weren't already in the stream crossings getting to Poverty Flat.

You need make the decision right at the start of the climb up the Poverty Flat fire road on the left side of the stream. You can go up the insane steep boring Poverty Flat road, or turn right across the creek for an adventure. Your choice. It's a typical Henry Coe option.

Either way, turn left at the bottom of Middle Ridge and follow along the creek for a ways to your decision point.
Agreed. DO NOT GO UP Cougar, you'll be pushing your bike the entire thing.
Take the creekside hike a bike.

If you do go up Poverty, then take the Lost Oaks Spring (or whatever it's called) trail to the top where it meets China Hole and Mahoney. As far as I know, Mahoney is a steep boring fireroad too.
 

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dan51 said:
Agreed. DO NOT GO UP Cougar, you'll be pushing your bike the entire thing.
Take the creekside hike a bike.

If you do go up Poverty, then take the Lost Oaks Spring (or whatever it's called) trail to the top where it meets China Hole and Mahoney. As far as I know, Mahoney is a steep boring fireroad too.
Cougar is no longer invisible. Steep though. I don't think it'd involve as much extra climbing as going up Poverty Flat to Jackass pass.

Anything that avoids Creekside will involve a bunch of extra steep climbing. If you want bonus footies that's good, but I doubt you'll want bonus footies at that point.

Poverty Flat and Mahoney Meadows are both quite steep, with MM being steeper. I'll give you a dollar if you can climb Mahoney Meadows from Los Cruzeros to China Hole Trail without stopping.

You could do Poverty Flat, part of MM, then take Lost Spring trail to avoid some of the steepness, as Dan pointed out. Most of the time Lost Spring is preferable to continuing on MM. Right now there's an awful lot of poison oak on Lost Spring. More than on Creekside.

I'd take Creekside. It's a lot easier and quicker. Chudaman probably wouldn't. :)
 

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Actually it sounds like next time I will take creekside, but i will prepare for the worst and wear something other than worn sidis for the hike-a-bike part...That's the point, prepare for the worst and go in with the mindset that its gonna be precarious, and then it will seem easy...i was wishing for an alternative but i forgot that it is coe...
 

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More Advice

mudworm said:
.. It's been years since my husband was there last time. And he is the kind of guy who will "just go ride it. If anything happens, just tough it out." His buddy was there recently, but he is not known to be the best navigator (if you are reading this, sorry for letting the secret out ;) ). That's why I want to do my own research and also I want to know what I'm getting into and what I need to prepare....
Just put things together in my mind finally. Based on your above comments, you'll want to skip the beginning singletrack and continue straight up Coit Rd. to Mahoney Meadows. And not just because that singletrack very steep and adds climb. Rather, that singletrack section is very confusing even with a map, with lots of odd little singletracks going in all directions. Most everyone goes the wrong way the first time through without a guide. Pandemonium is almost guaranteed if you have gung ho guys in front who just want to ride hard and don't care where. You'll get scattered like ants in a fire, and spend most of the day trying to find each other again. Do that section separately another day, until you get to know it. (Along these lines, two-way radios are an excellent safety device when you get separated at Henry Coe.)

It seems like most people are now advising doing the creekside trail from the bottom of Middle Ridge to China Hole. I concur. And the China Hole singletrack is some of the nicest grade at Henry Coe with excellent switchbacks - a sweet trail on both sides of the creek bottom. Just inch-by-inch your way over to it along the creekside and you'll be happy you did. :)

Look forward to your ride report. Post pictures!
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
My First Coe Experience

I'm taking a Written Communication Skills class for ESL Speakers at work. The first feedback my instructor gave me on my assignments was "wordy." Knowing my problem doesn't necessarily mean I know how to fix it. But it enables me to warn you -- this is going to be a long trip report. In an effort to cut down the word count, I will refer to my husband as E and his buddy as D in this report.

=======================================================

This would be my first time to Henry Coe and I do not get to ride my mountain bike every weekend, so I figured I should maximize this ride. 40 miles and 8500 feet of elevation gain later, I think I can say with satisfaction, "Mission Accomplished!"

Originally, I set out to do Plim's 34-mile route. I knew ours would be slightly longer because we would start from Hunting Hollow and we would need to make a little detour to the headquarter to refill our water and buy a map. We had to start from HH because we would not be early enough to get two parking spots at Cayote Creek Entrance -- as a matter of fact, we did not start riding until 10:46 AM. I also did not realize that none of us brought any money until we got to HQ -- well, I guess I'll buy a map by mail then, which was not a big deal because D brought his on the ride. But what really added the mileage was an unplanned detour.

Over all, the trails are well marked in the park. But there are always exceptions. I do not remember seeing the following two trail markers:
* Straightish onto Cattle Duster.
* Continue straightish/leftish on Coit Spring.
* Right up a no-name trail ...- the trail is very steep at first

However, following the most obvious path, it's unlikely you will get off trail there. The trail leads you to a post at a T intersection. A couple of laminated trail markers showed that we just came from Coit Spring Trail and Grapevine Trail was straight ahead. It didn't say anything about that trail going right. If I had taken a moment to think about it, I would have figured out that the trail to the right was the "no-name" trail. However, three friendly locals showed up just when we got there, and the guy among them, Mike, started chatting with us. Busy socializing, I didn't give myself time to think. Instead, I followed my instinct, which told me that according to this online map I had studied, that "no-name" trail was actually Grapevine Trail; therefore, we should stay on it. The locals did tell us that taking the trail to the right would be the shortest way to get on Coit Road, but I thought I should "stick to the plan." Somehow, all six of us started riding together on Grapevine Trail (going southwest). We stopped here and there to wait for the slow rider (even slower than me) in their group. But the guys did not seem to mind the wait at all because they were busy chatting about the park, the bikes, and fishing in the park. We did learn quite a bit about the park from Mike. We parted ways when we turned off Grapevine Trail onto a narrow/smooth/fun single track, which dumped us onto Coit Road. For some reason, I thought that was the no-name trail, even though it missed that steep section Plim had mentioned. Oh, well, I was just happy that we "stayed on course." So, when E pointed out that we should turn right in order to get to Mahoney Meadows, I pointed at my turn-by-turn directions and insisted we turn left on Coit Road. Boy, I could be stubborn sometimes. So, we turned left. Only when we got back to the first/lower Anza Trail turn off (we were there earlier) did I realize that I was wrong! Dang! We should have taken the trail going right where we met the locals after all! Up Coit Road we went. (So, BigLarry, I guess we also did the alternative you suggested -- taking Coit Road all the way to Mahoney Meadows.)

It was 2:30 PM when we turned around on Coit Road. Half annoyed by the fact that we might not have enough time to finish the planned route and half annoyed by my own navigational incompetency, I became crabby (D said he didn't notice, but E took a hit). Later when I apologized, E pointed out that it was my drive to do a long ride and to stick to a plan that made me crabby, but it was the same drive that got us through the long ride. Here is why. It was 4 PM when we were at HQ. E proposed that we cut the ride short by skipping Flat Frog Trail and Middle Ridge and go straight back to the car (I'm not sure if he actually knew the "straight" way). His reason was we might not have enough daylight. Ha, yesterday, you dismissed my suggestion of bringing a bike light or a headlamp. Pffft! D was as easygoing as always -- "I don't care. Either way is fine with me." But I insisted we "stick to the plan." (Did I say I was stubborn?) So, I got my way. Off Flat Frog Trail we went, which turned out to be my favorite trail on the ride. Never a downhiller, Middle Ridge scared me a bit. There were sections I chickened out and dismounted. But following Plim's instructions to the letter, I did utter a "wheeeeeee" or two here and there. It was when we got to Poverty Flat that I relaxed and stopped being crabby because I knew the plan would get us back to our car. Even if we had to do Coit Road in dimming light, that would not bother me, because we wouldn't get lost there.

However, we still had the notorious Creekside Trail to negotiate. As chudaman suggested, I prepared for the worst. The result? It was not bad at all. I actually enjoyed the little break from riding because my legs and butt were sore from climbing and my thumbs were sore from the death grips coming down Middle Ridge. Even though we missed the cutoff to the left and had to deal with the boulders before we hit China Hole Trail, it was all pretty manageable. That put us on the east side of China Hole Trail. The rest was just a long climb followed by a long descent back to the car. We got back around 7:15 PM with enough daylight left. Now that he had done the Creekside hike-a-bike, E said next time he would choose to ride Poverty Flat to Mahoney Meadows. He had ridden it before and a continuous ride is always more appealing to him. But he was happy to have done this alternative too.

This ride shows up 40.76 miles on D's bicycle computer and 39.59 miles on my GPS. Motionbased corrected it to 39.4 miles. However you look at it, it's a fairly long ride. But nobody cramped and there was no mechanical either. After the first stream crossing at China Hole, my chain rubbed and clicked pretty bad in the second half of the ride, but it stayed on. E got two ticks on him and I got one. Considering that was the only negative on this whole ride, I would call this one a smooth ride. We all had fun too! I now know what Coe is about, so next time, I think I'll be more relaxed.

BigLarry, I lugged our bulky camera on our ride just for you. Here are some photos from this ride:


Well, what can I say? "Hi, my name is blahblah, and I'm an engineer." It worked very well.


For people unfamiliar with Coe, the trail markers here are a little unique -- the name of the trail is in small font on the very top, and the most prominant words are for the destination -- where this trail will lead you.


Scared of crashing, I wear my elbow pads and shin/knee pads (under my pants) all the time. Sometimes, I do wonder how much lighter it would feel if I don't have them on.


China Hole Trail right above the stream crossing is steep, but D showed us determination can get you up anything.


Sitting at HQ, D and E are planning the next trip already.


Stream crossing on China Hole Trail. I managed not to get my shoes wet on the entire ride.


A Bob's 3/4 lbs burger made the trip complete -- it was my order at Black Bear Diner.

[/url]
Our skinny ride.
 

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Wow! What a ride! 40 miles and 8500'. :eekster:

I've never climbed more than about 7000' on a Henry Coe ride. Your pace, at 6.4 MPH moving average, is close to what I see for A riders at Henry Coe. (I average around 5 MPH moving at Henry Coe, 7-8 MPH elsewhere.) You guys are in superb shape for what you call occasional weekend MTB riders. :confused: You ride road or something?

mudworm said:
I'm taking a Written Communication Skills class for ESL Speakers at work. The first feedback my instructor gave me on my assignments was "wordy."
Not too wordy at all. I loved every word of your fun report and wanted more. But this is coming from me.

mudworm said:
...So, BigLarry, I guess we also did the alternative you suggested -- taking Coit Road all the way to Mahoney Meadows...
By alternative, I meant one route or the other, not both. :rolleyes: Oh well, I see you skipped going down Grapevine at the end as you'd already done it. So you now see what I mean about everyone getting lost on that section the first time through. At least you didn't separate too.

I'm surprised you kept going to complete the whole route, but I guess that's where your stubbornness pays off. And it's good you didn't skip Flat Frog and Middle Ridge. That's the best part, often considered the objective of the ride.

Incidentally, if you had a GPS, you could have downloaded Plim's MB tracks, and just followed along his dotted line on your map page, even with a non-mapping Edge like the 305. But then, you'd had less of a true Henry Coe adventure. :)

mudworm said:
Considering that was the only negative on this whole ride, I would call this one a smooth ride. We all had fun too! I now know what Coe is about, so next time, I think I'll be more relaxed.
I didn't want to scare you off from this nice ride, so I didn't previously mention this attempt at the same ride. We've nicknamed it the Henry Coe Clusterf*ck ride, which shows what happens when everything goes wrong. We later repeated the ride with a nicer outcome, similar to yours.

mudworm said:
BigLarry, I lugged our bulky camera on our ride just for you.
Thanks! Great report and pictures. :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 · (Edited)
BigLarry said:
Your pace, at 6.4 MPH moving average, is close to what I see for A riders at Henry Coe.
E said you were off your rocker, but thank you for your kind words. I didn't feel that we were fast, but I guess we kept going when we were on the trails.

BigLarry said:
Incidentally, if you had a GPS, you could have downloaded Plim's MB tracks, and just followed along his dotted line on your map page, even with a non-mapping Edge like the 305.
I tried it on my Edge 305: I clicked on GPS Device link, which opened Montionbased Agent automatically, and then I sent the course to my device, for which it showed 100% successful. Then, I went to my Garmin -- nothing showed up either in Routes or History. Oh,well, maybe I missed something, but I did it half-heartedly, so wasn't bothered by it.

Seeing your account of the Henry Coe Clusterf*ck ride, I am happy that we kept our group of 3 together, which was not hard at all because both guys were extremely patient.

Oh, I'm glad to hear that you enjoyed the report.

Fast Eddy said:
That's a pretty ambitious recovery of a pretty major clerical error.
Hehe, we got lucky. :)

Fast Eddy said:
Too bad Plim's directions didn't include any elevation clues. You would have noticed the errant downhill pretty easily.
No, in hindsight, Plim's directions were spot on. He did mention "up" and "down" wherever it was really needed. And I did doubt myself as soon as we went straight on Grapevine Trail because we were supposed to have made a right turn and the trail was supposed to be "very steep at first." But the guys were having interesting conversations with Mike, and I, for a moment, thought to myself "Plim might have remembered it wrong." Oh, how dare I have doubted Plim!
 

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mudworm said:
E said you were off your rocker, but thank you for your kind words. I didn't feel that we were fast, but I guess we kept going when we were on the trails.
I generally see A, B, and C rides at Henry Coe have a moving average of a little over 7, 6, and 5 MPH respectively. So you're more in the B+ range.

I get an average there of a little over 5 MPH. If I ride in Santa Teresa, Quicksilver, or Sierra Azul, my average moving speed increases to 7-8 MPH. The speed at Henry Coe is slower because of steep hills, more climb per mile, stream crossings, trail portage, etc. It's sometimes called the 1.5X Henry Coe Factor.

On your GPS, you need to download and check for saved Tracks (not Routes). On some GPS units, you may need to select a menu item to make the saved track visible on the map page. I don't have the Edge so I can't be more specific.
 
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