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It seems with COVID, all the wheel builders that were backlogged waiting on parts, are now booked for 3+ months now that parts are available.

As a result I am going to have to relace the wheel myself.

My base wheel is a Shimano WH-M8120 which is 148 Boost spacing. I plan on swapping the hub with a FH-M8110 which is 142mm (to fit my frame).

I have confirmed with Shimano the the spokes and nipples are the same and can be reused. The only thing I'll need to replace is the tubeless rim tape.

I am sure I will be able to do this as I build things in real life (lol) however as I have never attempted the task I though I would reach out to you all for any tips?

Thanks in advance.
1942139
 

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It seems with COVID, all the wheel builders that were backlogged waiting on parts, are now booked for 3+ months now that parts are available.

As a result I am going to have to relace the wheel myself.

My base wheel is a Shimano WH-M8120 which is 148 Boost spacing. I plan on swapping the hub with a FH-M8110 which is 142mm (to fit my frame).

I have confirmed with Shimano the the spokes and nipples are the same and can be reused. The only thing I'll need to replace is the tubeless rim tape.

I am sure I will be able to do this as I build things in real life (lol) however as I have never attempted the task I though I would reach out to you all for any tips?

Thanks in advance. View attachment 1942139
So, just replacing the rim with an identical one? If so, then its very easy. Just stack the rims on top of each other and tape them together. If there is spoke hole offset, make sure that is accounted for when you align the rims. Loosen all the spokes on the old rim, but do not remove them, just leave a turn or so of threads on each. Then work your way around the rim, moving one spoke at a time to the new rim. The biggest issue is not dropping nipples inside the rim. I usually try and push the spoke far enough into the old rim so that I can hand remove the nipple with my fingers, and then do the same to add it to the new rim. If the new rum does not have eyelets, I like to lightly grease the nipple bed. Makes tensioning and trueing much smoother.

Once laced, then follow all the basic stuff for tension, dish, stress relieve, true.

Good luck
 

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Purchase the Roger Munson Book for $12, print it out and follow it step by step.


There is nothing intrinsically hard about wheel building, it just takes going through it methodically and some patience. There is no reason your first build will not be as good as a bike shop build. The big thing that an expert wheelbuilder brings is the knowledge of component selection and speed. Having build several dozen wheels, I can do a pair in about 2-3 hours. A professional can knock out a perfectly built pair in less than an hour.
 

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Building a good wheel is relatively simple, the pro skill is speed.

Sheldon brown's website is a gold mine for wheel building.

One good tip for not losing nipples in the rim is to thread a spare spoke in the rear of the nipple when there is room.
 

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Purchase the Roger Munson Book for $12, print it out and follow it step by step.


There is nothing intrinsically hard about wheel building, it just takes going through it methodically and some patience. There is no reason your first build will not be as good as a bike shop build. The big thing that an expert wheelbuilder brings is the knowledge of component selection and speed. Having build several dozen wheels, I can do a pair in about 2-3 hours. A professional can knock out a perfectly built pair in less than an hour.
That seems optimistic on the time frames, I've been building wheels for quite a long time and though I could "knock out" a pair of wheels in an hour I wouldn't because it takes longer than that to get the tensions correctly balanced. An hour per wheel is quick for me.

Afree that the op could do a quality job but one major advantage a pro (or well tooled amateur) has is a quality tension meter. And lots of experience.

For the first set I'd probably check out a good you tube vid for the lacing process.
 

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That seems optimistic on the time frames, I've been building wheels for quite a long time and though I could "knock out" a pair of wheels in an hour I wouldn't because it takes longer than that to get the tensions correctly balanced. An hour per wheel is quick for me.

Afree that the op could do a quality job but one major advantage a pro (or well tooled amateur) has is a quality tension meter. And lots of experience.

For the first set I'd probably check out a good you tube vid for the lacing process.
Tensionmeter definitely helps. I use a park for rough tensions and a Jobst Brandt version for the final tension and balance. Then again, I build up with even tension as the first priority and trueness as the second.
 
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It seems with COVID, all the wheel builders that were backlogged waiting on parts, are now booked for 3+ months now that parts are available.
I keep hearing this, but it doesn't add up.

My build queue is a few days on parts in stock -- of which there are a lot.

Alternately, if you want some purple (or orange, or red...) Onyx or I9 hubs, you're going to have to wait.
 

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I keep hearing this, but it doesn't add up.

My build queue is a few days on parts in stock -- of which there are a lot.

Alternately, if you want some purple (or orange, or red...) Onyx or I9 hubs, you're going to have to wait.
I would guess that when people inquire from shops, wheels are part of their normal queue, and therefore weeks out. I am guessing your customer base is different and more stable, higher end buyers that get to you by word of mouth, were buying wheels before the pandemic, and continue to buy them.
 

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I would guess that when people inquire from shops, wheels are part of their normal queue, and therefore weeks out. I am guessing your customer base is different and more stable, higher end buyers that get to you by word of mouth, were buying wheels before the pandemic, and continue to buy them.
You might be right across the board.
 

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I've built 3 wheel sets now, started with no knowledge at all. Watch many youtube videos before you start, you'll pick up a few things from each one. Then +1 for Sheldon Brown's website, explains it in easy to follow plain English. You can read along as you go.

If your drive side and non-drive side spokes are different lengths, make sure you've got them on the correct side before you get too far into it. Also note that the spoke holes have a left and right. If you look closely at them, you can see which way they are directing the spoke towards. Check that too before you get to far. It sucks to lace an entire wheel, go to tension it up, and THEN realize you screwed up one of these things. Don't ask me how I know.

Assuming you don't have a truing stand, you can put the wheel in the frame and use that. Various sites will recommend some form of zip ties, piece of velcro, or paper clip contraptions to use as feeler gauges. I took a ruler (out of my combination square) and used some rubber bands to hold it to the frame. If you line up your sightline with the hash marks you can spin the rim and see where it is out of true laterally. If you are careful you can eyeball the centerline of the frame pretty close. Can also use the ruler to get the radial true.
 

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Musson book, yes! And he doesn't waste a lot of space pondering theory, just tells you how.

The way Musson lines up the spokes... cross 3 = 3 holes back from the label on the drive side and then put the end behind the valve hole... is far easier to understand than Sheldon's site. I used a bamboo skewer to get each nipple started without losing it.

The big time saver for me in lacing, specifically, was to make a nipple driver bit by grinding a regular flat head screwdriver bit, and also a bit holder that I filed down the OD to fit in the spoke holes. (If you started with a longer screwdriver bit you might not need this, otoh if you have a deep rim it might still not be good enough).
 

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Parks tension gauge. Destressing the build. Put the hub on a magazine on the floor. Kneel on the rim at about 5 and 7 o'clock. Push down on the rim at 1 and 11. Rotate it 15 degrees. Repeat. Flip. Repeat. Check tension and true. Repeat.
 

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A good solid wheel build fixture is very valuable. You can do it with your bike frame, but it is hard to hold it solid, and to attach dial indicators.
I use 2 dial indicators. One to measure left/right runout, and the other on the diameter to keep it round. To keep the rim centered you can measure with a digital caliper.. A spoke tension gage is essential. I built my first wheel without one and got it close, then borrowed a gage to check my wheel. After seeing it work, I would never attempt to build a wheel without a tensioner.
 
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