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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone! I'm very new to MTB and have only just recently purchased my first bike secondhand. The bike I purchased had no size number on it, and the seller told me it was a medium. However, it does feel a little small after taking it out on some trails recently. Just wanting to know everyone's thoughts/ advice on the sizing, does it appear to fit correctly? Is there much I can do to adjust the fit?
I am about 168 cm tall and weighs 58 kg.
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It does look a little short by today's standards... doesn't mean you won't be able to ride it just fine.

Things that may help bike feel roomier:
*Slide seat as far back as allowed
*Run a longer stem
*Roll your handlebars forward
*Run wider handlebars

o/c some of the above will require you to invest more money, into a bike that you may never be comfortable on.

Sent from my Asus Rog 3
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It does look a little short by today's standards... doesn't mean you won't be able to ride it just fine.

Things that may help bike feel roomier:
*Slide seat as far back as allowed
*Run a longer stem
*Roll your handlebars forward
*Run wider handlebars

o/c some of the above will require you to invest more money, into a bike that you may never be comfortable on.

Sent from my Asus Rog 3
Hi there! Thanks for your response and suggestions ! I have tried sliding the seat back, how would I "roll the handle bars forward"? What do you mean by that?
 

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Hi there! Thanks for your response and suggestions ! I have tried sliding the seat back, how would I "roll the handle bars forward"? What do you mean by that?
That's where you loosen the stem faceplate bolts and rotate the handlebar forward or back. Be careful to not roll the bar too far forward to where the ends of your handlebar point up. You'll also need to adjust your brake levers and shifter after rotating the bar.

 

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What size stem is on it now?

Getting crazy with the stem length can make the reach feel better, but it can also get you very front heavy. Awesome for keeping the front wheel planted on a climb, awful for making sure your rear wheel does not end up over your head on a descent.

As mentioned wider bars are a really good way to increase effective reach, kind of depends on how wide the current bars are as to how much extra width you can run.

It doesn't look like the bike has a dropper on it, if you're not interested in a dropper a setback seat post might help give you some more room as well.
 

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Its alittle short, Some of the advice about moving the seat back makes the too slack seat tube make the bike climb worse as it puts your weight back. With that said I am guessing you own and its ok just run it. If you buying older bike generally you can size up a couple size and get close to a "modern" day fit assuming the seat tube does nt get too long. I would avoid spending money on this and save for something newer, but for adjust what you have with in reason to make it work as best as possible.

Whats your height, inseam, and "ape" index?
 

· jcd's best friend
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The fit looks 50/50 to me. The reach looks short so it may feel more like a BMX bike than a mountain bike. Not a huge deal though.

I did look up the bike (reading the info backwards) and it looks like a GT Chucker which is a free ride bike. It's probably heavier than most other mountain bikes because it's designed to be "chucked."
 

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Things I look for in bike fit, and these should be confirmed by the collective cause may be "wrong-ish"

1. I want to be neutral on the bike for MY riding. FOR ME, that means when the bike is "halfway between flat and steeply pointed downhill on a smooth surface", and positioned with arms and legs bent so as to soak up hits on a trail, I want near zero weight on my hands. all on my legs. If I were a city biker, I'd want that neutral position when the bike is flat.

2. knee over the pedal is impossible because I look like a spider with my gangly limbs, but when the bike is pointed UP, the position to get knee over pedal changes, and that helps.

3. great video online about BB to center bar matching the gap from feet to fist. At least in a range. That is super helpful for getting the stem in the ballpark. Between that and the neutral position it gets the right stack height and stem length. For one bike (older geo), I could get that with a longer stem and flat bars with steerer spacers. For my modern bike, I needed a short stem and a ridiculous rise on a riser bar.

I have gone through 4 seats, 3 pedals, 4-6 stems, and 2 handlebars to get to this point. And now I am VERY happy with my old geo bike, and getting close with my new bike.

I could have gotten here faster and cheaper by buying a bike fitting. But this more expensive way is more fun. it requires more trail riding.

Don't forget to keep your wrists neutral or you'll screw up your hands. Ask me how I know.
 

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If you have an existing bike that fits you well, measure the distance between the center of the bottom bracket to the steerer tube where the grips intersect. This will get you the RAD distance.
The other is from center of bottom bracket to the top of the seat. This will tell you how much to adjust the seat for best pedaling efficiency.
The last is from the ground with your riding shoes on to the top of the top tube. This will tell you if you an safely straddle the bike to get off of it.
 

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Looking it up, GT Chucker is a dirt jump and freeride bike and not a trail bike so the geometry is going to be different than "normal" especially today vs ten-fifteen years ago.

5ft6 is going to need either squarely small or on the medium-small boundary depending on brand.
 
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