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Resident Newbie
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought a Trek 6000 and so far I love it. I'm getting back into riding after about 15 years and am way out of shape. I've been riding on the road for about 2 weeks and am up to 4.5 miles a day. Is this enough to get onto the trails or should I be in better shape to have any fun.

 

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local trails rider
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12,300 Posts
Trails are more fun than road.

4.5 miles is not much but spend the same time on some easy trails: you will have more fun.
 

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Welcome back to the sport and the forum!
Go ahead on the trails, just remeber that a mile on the street is usually easier than a mile on the dirt.
 

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Life is Good
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Just go ride some trails. Who cares how many miles you can ride on the road, because once you get on the trail all worry about distance and time will fade away into complete and total bliss :)

Enjoy the new bike!
 

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Resident Newbie
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Is there anything I absolutely have to get to hit the trails? I know clipless pedals and shoes will help according to a friend but as long as I have a few allen wrenches and a pump I should be OK.
 

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local trails rider
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Dawn Rider said:
...I know clipless pedals and shoes will help according to a friend but as long as I have a few allen wrenches and a pump I should be OK.
Clipless is good for more power and stability over rough ground. It is not compulsory:eek:

People get thirsty when riding. I carried bottles in a back pack for a couple of years before upgrading to a Camelback system.

If you go further than you are willing to push the bike back, you need some tools and a way to fix a flat. Some metric hex keys go a long way but a biking multitool is handy for keeping "everything" with you. To fix a flat it is best to have a spare inner tube, pump, tyre levers (plastic), and a patch kit (just in case you have more than one flat)... and some idea of how to use them.

edit: surely you already have a helmet and gloves?
 

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ride hard take risks
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Dawn Rider said:
Is there anything I absolutely have to get to hit the trails? I know clipless pedals and shoes will help according to a friend but as long as I have a few allen wrenches and a pump I should be OK.
Dont worry about pedals yet just go out & ride enjoying the trails & country without thought of milage. :thumbsup:

Suggest a CamelBack, tire levers, tube, mini pump, Clif Bar & Gell or a PayDay bar, multi tool should be a good start. Learning how to fix a flat is important, you may never have to but if the time comes your at least prepaired, who knows you may end up rescuing somone else & be the hero. :drumroll:

http://www.parktool.com/repair/bikemap.asp
 

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thats right living legend
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At 4.5 miles on the rode you WILL NOT be in the kinda shape it takes to really have a great time. Just remember stick with it... it get's funner the more fit you become.


Bike looks great BTW.
 

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You know my steez...
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Excellent advice

dogonfr said:
Dont worry about pedals yet just go out & ride enjoying the trails & country without thought of milage. :thumbsup:

Suggest a CamelBack, tire levers, tube, mini pump, Clif Bar & Gell or a PayDay bar, multi tool should be a good start. Learning how to fix a flat is important....

http://www.parktool.com/repair/bikemap.asp
Ditto that:D
 

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Resident Newbie
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97 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
yup already have gloves but I need a helmet. That was actually my next question. Do I need a full shell helmet like a skateboard helmet or is a standard bike helmet O.K.
 

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ride hard take risks
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Dawn Rider said:
yup already have gloves but I need a helmet. That was actually my next question. Do I need a full shell helmet like a skateboard helmet or is a standard bike helmet O.K.
Good quality XC helmet is fine, buy from your LBS to get a good fit. The LBS that sold you the bike should be able to give you a deal since they should have tryed to sell you one anyway. :thumbsup:
 

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Resident Newbie
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The LBS that I bought from was not at all helpful. I pretty much had to pick out my bike myself and ask any questions that I thought of. The only reason that I got the bike there is because I couldn't find the 6000 in my size. They are harder to find now that the 08's are getting ready to come out. Thanks all for the advise. I'm hooked and I'll be sticking around.
 

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local trails rider
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Dawn Rider said:
skateboard helmet or is a standard bike helmet O.K.
A skateboard helmet may offer more protection to the back of the head but a "bike helmet" has much better ventilation to keep you comfortable when you get hot.

I will not recommend a brand or model because heads are different. A helmet must conform to a relevant safety standard and it must fit your head. You need to be able to adjust it so that it stays on snugly and is also comfortable. Wind tunnel testing, carbon fiber, and lowest weight are options for those who can afford them. If the only helmet that fits is marketed for road use, buy it anyway.
 

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ride hard take risks
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perttime said:
A skateboard helmet may offer more protection to the back of the head but a "bike helmet" has much better ventilation to keep you comfortable when you get hot.

I will not recommend a brand or model because heads are different. A helmet must conform to a relevant safety standard and it must fit your head. You need to be able to adjust it so that it stays on snugly and is also comfortable. Wind tunnel testing, carbon fiber, and lowest weight are options for those who can afford them. If the only helmet that fits is marketed for road use, buy it anyway.
:thumbsup: Word :thumbsup:

 

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also pick up a trial guide for your area.
falcon, and off the beaten track are the two i know. that will give you ideas on difficulty, distance, and location.
oh, and i never go into the woods with out a map, too.
 

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40 & Fast
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Dawn Rider said:
I just bought a Trek 6000 and so far I love it. I'm getting back into riding after about 15 years and am way out of shape. I've been riding on the road for about 2 weeks and am up to 4.5 miles a day. Is this enough to get onto the trails or should I be in better shape to have any fun.

Having fun riding is most important and what will keep you doing it. Its better than a gym membership for me. Most of my rides are in the 4 to 6 mile range; after work when I don't have alot of time. I ride mostly dirt trails as it's more excercise per mile and the technical trails keep me focused and are therefor more entertaining. I would recommend clipless pedals as I cannot imagine riding anyother way.
 

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Off-road riding will be a lot harder, but as mentioned here it is also much more fun as there is a lot more going on. Find yourself an easy rated 7-8 mile trail in your area and go for it, even better find a friend to show you the way, take it easy and just enjoy. That way you should be able to assess how easy / hard it was and work on improving. First and foremost have fun

My priority for kit would be:

Helmet + gloves - already sorted.
Puncture repair kit + levers + pump.
Water vessel :) bottle or camelback type.

After you have hit a few trails and "got the bug" :) think about a multi tool / hex kit and chain tool (they do break..) and a spare innertube for convenience and some basic first aid stuff if you ride a lot solo. Then yes, think about investing in a good pair of shoes + pedals if you like, but be forewarned, this is the downhill route to additional spending (forks next, new bike, new bikes... :D )
 
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