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slow and whiney
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Went to Performance to try on MTB shoes and see what size I am, and ended up impulse-buying the shoes that felt the best and were on sale (Garneau Bro-something), along with a set of Candy 1's, which were also on sale. More than I wanted to spend to try this out, but I got brand new stuff, which is always good, and I had it for this AM's ride. I went home and installed the pedals and cleats, practiced clipping in/out, dorking around, made some adjustments, and seemed to have the hang of it.

We did 15 miles of Desert Classic this morning, which for the most part went very well. Only problem was for some reason, getting clipped in was not as simple as it was yesterday. Guess I need more practice. Best part was, I kept up with my wife going uphill, and actually pedaled up the little hill near the water tank for the first time. I found myself pedaling and going faster through rocky chop, where before I'd be more focused on keeping my feet on the pedals. As the miles wore on, it was a little annoying to not be able to move my feet around, and my left foot sometimes felt like part of it was going to sleep. My bad knee complained a little here and there, but never became a problem. My good knee got smacked by a big rock my front tire kicked up on a fast downhill, which kind of brought pain levels into perspective - the rock hurt a lot more than anything else.

Overall, the experience was positive. The links CrankyMonkey posted in the other thread, specifically barefoot pedaling, were playing over in my head as I tried to focus on good pedaling technique. :thumbsup:
 

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If you noticed your left foot falling asleep, you need to make some adjustments to the cleat location on the shoe, and possibly to the bike. Also is there any float in those pedals? Having just started over the last few months having knee issues It is no fun, so proper adjustment is a must to lessen the knee issues.
 

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Candy ain't dandy

I know the Candy seems like a good, cheap way to get started with clipless pedals, but I wouldn't base your opinion of clipless pedals on the Candy pedals.:nono:

My girlfriend bought a pair of them to replace an old pair of Shimano pedals, that still worked even though they looked like you took a rock pick to em. The Candy pedals were cheap, so she gave them a try.

Right off the bat, she was falling over in places that she never fell over with her Shimano pedals, and she said she was having trouble with her foot getting stuck.:madman: Even carefully trimming her shoes did not stop the awkward falls. Not only that, but in only weeks of riding them they looked like you took an eggbeater out of your utensil drawer and tossed it under a semi truck. And the worse they got bashed up, the more she got stuck in them. Add to it, that if you hit the bottom on a rock, they spit you out.

She then got Shimano M-647 pedals with the SH-56 multi release cleat, and has not had a problem since. The Candy pedals are weak, and won't take the rock abuse that technical Arizona trails dish out, and the release is inconsistent. The 647 pedals have taken 2 years of rock thrashing and are going strong with no maintenance at all. We have changed the cleats once. And with the multi release cleat, exit is completely intuitive and takes absolutely no learning curve at all.

Other opinions and mileage may vary. However you will find lots of ammo around here that Candy pedals do not hold up to abuse.
 

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Definitely take the time to set the seat hieght (inseam times .887, I actually go about a 1/2 inch more than my calcs say it should be for me so its just a good starting point), the fore/aft positioning of the seat (bring either pedal with your foot clipped in and seated on the bike to its most forward position and the front edge of your knee should be directly in line with the axis of the pedal, I use a plumb bob here) and then position the cleat directly under the ball of your foot (I started with it more towards the toes but have read it should be directly under the ball so thats where I am at). You can also twist the cleat in eaither direction slightly to allow for a more comfortable foot position if you want. I have run clipless since I started MBing and have no issues with pain/discomfort and figure its due to careful setup. Hope this helps!
 

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slow and whiney
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
twowheelsdown2002 said:
I know the Candy seems like a good, cheap way to get started with clipless pedals, but I wouldn't base your opinion of clipless pedals on the Candy pedals.:nono:

My girlfriend bought a pair of them to replace an old pair of Shimano pedals, that still worked even though they looked like you took a rock pick to em. The Candy pedals were cheap, so she gave them a try.

Right off the bat, she was falling over in places that she never fell over with her Shimano pedals, and she said she was having trouble with her foot getting stuck.:madman: Even carefully trimming her shoes did not stop the awkward falls. Not only that, but in only weeks of riding them they looked like you took an eggbeater out of your utensil drawer and tossed it under a semi truck. And the worse they got bashed up, the more she got stuck in them. Add to it, that if you hit the bottom on a rock, they spit you out.

She then got Shimano M-647 pedals with the SH-56 multi release cleat, and has not had a problem since. The Candy pedals are weak, and won't take the rock abuse that technical Arizona trails dish out, and the release is inconsistent. The 647 pedals have taken 2 years of rock thrashing and are going strong with no maintenance at all. We have changed the cleats once. And with the multi release cleat, exit is completely intuitive and takes absolutely no learning curve at all.

Other opinions and mileage may vary. However you will find lots of ammo around here that Candy pedals do not hold up to abuse.
For the price, they'll do the trick, even if they don't do it for very long. I didn't have any problems getting out of them, just getting in, which I expect will improve with practice. Also, the cleats provide two different release angles - I used the lesser of the two, and didn't have a problem. Haven't tried in a panic yet, so perhaps my tune will change then :)

The M-647's do look to be a nice pedal, just wish they weren't double the price.
 

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slow and whiney
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
jvm051 said:
If you noticed your left foot falling asleep, you need to make some adjustments to the cleat location on the shoe, and possibly to the bike. Also is there any float in those pedals? Having just started over the last few months having knee issues It is no fun, so proper adjustment is a must to lessen the knee issues.
Heh, my wife said the same thing re: cleat adjustment.

They have some float (6 degrees according to CB), which is part of why I picked them. I can move around a little bit.
 

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WaylonMcFlailin said:
The M-647's do look to be a nice pedal, just wish they weren't double the price.
They last 4 times as long, which makes them HALF the price.:thumbsup:

Also, they are much easier to clip into then the Candy pedals, not to mention easier to dab in a panic situation. One of the few times I will agree with Mountain Bike Action and their 5 out of 5 star rating.
 

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It ain't easy being Green
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WaylonMcFlailin said:
Heh, my wife said the same thing re: cleat adjustment.

They have some float (6 degrees according to CB), which is part of why I picked them. I can move around a little bit.
As others have mentioned it's essential, whatever brand of pedals, to set up your cleat/saddle position appropriately. You should aim to get the pedal stem to line up with the "bump" on the edge of your foot below the big toe joint, then adjust gently fore and aft if that doesn't work for you. Eggbeaters have just enough float to avoid knee pain provided that you set them up properly. Take the time, it's worth it.

It's true that if you bash them on rocks you can bend the metal wings on the underside of the pedal, but you have to try pretty hard... riding the Fort Valley trails in Flag recently I took chunks out of my BB and lost a few teeth on my big ring but my eggbeaters were fine.

I find it interesting that on your very first clipless ride you were faster and more confident than on flats; according to others that must mean that you suck at riding, I say simply that "clipless is better"; it will get better still as your confidence increases.

Let the games begin :)
 
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