Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
21 - 33 of 33 Posts

·
Fat-tired Roadie
Joined
·
18,453 Posts
Handspun is a QBP house brand. They probably get the Alfine hubs in bulk, in an OEM package not including all the other stuff to make them work.
 

·
ride the moment
Joined
·
824 Posts
rodar y rodar said:
Yeah, I imagine that would work pretty well too. I can`t say from first hand knowledge, but I`ve read that when the "standard" road spacing went from 120 to 126 and from 126 to 130, a lot of hubs came with beveled locknuts to make it easier to force them into the dropouts without respacing. Since my commuter had to go from 126 to 135, I went ahead and respaced- would have probably been a bit of a hassle to stretch that far every time I mounted the rear wheel. Then again, maybe not since I never tried to.
I've got an old Scwinn (I think) and the wheel goes in without much effort. If you had beefy chainstays it might not be so simple. I basically put my thumbs on the hub and curl my fingers around the stays and just pull it apart and slide it over. I don't have to jam anything but there is friction once it comes to moving the wheel within the dropout, but I honestly like it as it makes aligning the wheel a little easier.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Though I would post a quick update.

There hasn't been much progress in the last week or so, I'm still waiting for the brakes to arrive. In the meantime some of the drivetrain has shown up. I give it a quick test fit last night. All-in-all the crank, rear cog, and Alfine chain tensioner don't line up at all. The CT is the worse, it came with 3 washers to space it out from the derailer hanger, but honestly it still isn't even close. As a solution I was thinking about removing the arm and milling off about .200" to get the alignment close, then fine tune with the supplied washers. As for the crank I connected the gear on the backside of the cranks to space it a little closer to the bottom bracket.
Test fitting the drivetrain:


1" threadless headset install:


DT close-ups



I ended up going with kenda small block 8's 700C X 35C, They're a close fit on the front, but should work good for the surfaces i'll be riding on


Thanks for reading.
 

·
Fat-tired Roadie
Joined
·
18,453 Posts
.200" sounds like a lot.

Think a chain tensioner for a singlespeed conversion might work better? At least it would be purpose-built for landing a chain possibly pretty far inboard of the dropout.
 

·
weirdo
Joined
·
6,223 Posts
Sounds like a lot to me, too. The sprockets that came with my Nexus were dished, so flipping them moves the chain line by a couple mms. If your sprocket is dished too, is it mounted in the way that puts it in the best line? And are you sure you even need the tensioner? It looks like you have fairly long dropouts. On my bike, I remember that I ended up turning those anti rotation gizmos so that the tab was "inside" in order to get my chain tight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Thanks for the response guys,
I'm actually having a problem with the chain tensioner(CT) being too close to the wheel. I need to move it closer to the chain stays. I currently have my dished sprocket facing toward the chain stay (moving the teeth closer to the chain stays) to help align with the Crank. If I swapped the cog and faced the dish toward the spokes of the wheel the Chain tensioner would line up quite nice, However the cranks would be way outta wack.
I can't do away with the Chain tensioner because I plan on using a a disk brake in the back. When I weld the tabs on I will ensure the wheel is located at the back of the dropouts, so if removed everything regarding the brakes will line-up again.

I would also assume it's a better idea to have the chain/drivetrian closer to the bike to cut down on tensions on the bottom bracket and rear wheel. I bet the handling might see and improvement as well. SO with that in mind maybe I should be looking at moving the cranks closer to the center of the bike rather then moving everything else outward.
Is there a tolerance for lining up drivetrain components?
Thanks
 

·
weirdo
Joined
·
6,223 Posts
I can`t help you with the tollerance question, but I bet any of these SS guys could- hopefully one will explain that one. I do think you`re right to line up the sprocket with the rings even if it means some misalignment for the tensioner.

You lost me when you mentioned milling off part of the tensioner- I thought you wanted to move it closer to the centerline of the bike. I guess you just meant to give yourself some room to play with the washers?

A few ideas that might help- shorter BB? It looks like a square taper, which wouldn`t be TOO expensive and come in a variety of lengths. Spacers between the ring and the cranks (maybe ugly, but cheap) and flip the sprocket? Derailler instead of the Nexus tensioner and adjust with the high limit until it lines up? My guess for the "right" fix would be the BB spindle. I`m sure you`ll find some kind of fix. Good luck with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #30 ·
I wasn't aware you could get different size spindles for the BB, that'll will fix the alignment problem perfectly. Thanks.

It was a nice out this weekend so I took the bike for a ride. It has no brakes and still needs lots of work, but I couldn't help myself. The internal gear hub is really cool, the difference between gears took a bit to get used to, but i'm happy with it. It seem to handle well and was very stable (reminded me of my triathlon bike). Once I get some brakes I'll try pushing the bike a bit harder to see where the limits are and how stable if feels during some down hill/high speed corning.


 

·
Fat-tired Roadie
Joined
·
18,453 Posts
Keep in mind that loose spindles are a replacement part for the old adjustable bottom brackets (which I think suck - they had almost nothing in the way of seals, so riding in the rain required a rebuild.)

Cartridge bottom brackets come in different spindle lengths, but you have to buy the whole unit. It's not a big deal - about $30. But I'd want to get it right the first time.

I'm curious to know what your riding position looks like with a reach and saddle-bars drop like that.
 

·
Hi.
Joined
·
3,865 Posts
Forgive my ignorance, but why use a chain tensioner? Couldn't you achieve a cleaner look without one, just by moving the wheel forwards or backwards within the dropouts? Also, if you were way off, you could use a half-link chain?

And I'd go for brazing of the disc tabs. The lower heat will give you fewer problems on those skinny seatstays. You'll also need a seatstay-chainstay gusset or bridge.

For the disc tabs, I'd use slotted ones that give you flexibility in mounting the caliper, such as these ones:

http://www.bikelugs.com/store/index.php?strWebAction=item_detail&intItemID=91

You may need to modify the tab a bit to fit the frame snugly.

Good luck, the bike is starting to look very clean!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Hey thanks for the interest,
I'm using the chain tensor because I want the wheel to sit alway back in the dropouts. This way I can use disk tabs that don't have any adjustments, besides the spherical washers on the screws . I'd rather go this route because it works well on my current MTB. I've set it up once and it's been good ever since even with removing and reinstalling the rear wheel. I fear that having disk tabs with adjustable slots will cause me headaches in the future when the chain stretches and I have to readjust the wheel in the drop out.

Have you ever used them?

Also, thanks for the link. Ive been doing some reading and i think i'd like to make my own frame when this project is complete.
 
21 - 33 of 33 Posts
Top