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If anyone rides a hardtail with Panaracer Fire XC's, could you tell me what pressure you ride on front and rear.

I'll be riding on technical singletrack most of the time.

Thanks.
 

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Domestic Fowl
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wipe-out said:
If anyone rides a hardtail with Panaracer Fire XC's, could you tell me what pressure you ride on front and rear.

I'll be riding on technical singletrack most of the time.

Thanks.
This depends a lot on your weight, riding, style terrain, etc... I'm about 165 and ride a hardtail agressively on dry rocky terrain with the "pantywasters". I run around 38 PSI in the rear and 36 up front. I do incur some pinch flats on occasion, but I like the traction I get at those pressures.
 

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wipe-out said:
If anyone rides a hardtail with Panaracer Fire XC's, could you tell me what pressure you ride on front and rear.

I'll be riding on technical singletrack most of the time.

Thanks.
It would help if you provide your weight, riding style, trail conditions (roots, rocks, sharp rocks, drops, jumps, etc. You'll also want to know about these items from the recommendations you get.

I don't own a hardtail, but I do ride a fully rigid...that should be fine for the rear tire. I usually run the rear at 40-43psi. When I put the tire on my FS front, I run about 35-38 psi.

My riding weight is about 180. Most of my riding is on rooty and rocky (smooth rocks)singletrack. There are a few sandy spots and smoe loose laomy areas. There are lots of logs and log piles and 1-3 foot drops. The above pressures are for this type of riding.

When I go to places like Downieville, I have to increase the pressure by about 5-7 psi to avoid pinch flats on the sharp rocks
 

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More pressure, but only on Panaracer.

I'm about the same weight as you and ride on Panaracer Trailblasters--which are based on the Fire XC design but I frankly think they're a step up--sorry if that seems blasphemous. At least they're lighter than the Fire XCs.

Anyway, I say you don't have enough pressure in your tires. I run mine at 50 psi. You might even try putting the front tire at 55 psi. I'm not saying this is the gospel, but you should try it. If you're running non-technical trails, twisty singletrack even, you shouldn't have to keep your tires soft and will actually be able to get better performance at a higher pressure.

I say this only in regard to specifically the Panaracer Fire XC and Trailblaster tires though. Both models have excellent grip on the trail and in turns due to the materials, design, and craftspersonship. They don't need to be softened as much as other tires in order to perform well.
 

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I'm about 145 riding a steel hardtail

and run 30 front and rear. Even on the 1.8 Fire at the rear, I run 30.
 

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I run 50 psi in my fire tires. Hill climbing feels much easier when pumped up to that psi. If my front tire breaks loose when downhilling, the slide has always been predictable. My thinking is if you have a shock up front, run the tires hard, the shock smooths things out for you. Sometimes I'll lower the psi in the rear tire to smooth things out in the rear when downhilling.
 

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Chillin the Most
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When I used to use Fires, I ran them at 35psi front / 40psi rear. BTW, I weigh 230. They are one of the best average tires around.
 

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35-32

I'm 160 and on both my HT and FS, I ride 35 in the rear and 32 up front. I find this is perfect for East Coast rocky, rooty, windy single track. Never pinch flat and no flats whatsoever in over 4 years on these tires.
 

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Domestic Fowl
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Pros and cons of high/low tire pressure.....
(high and low are relative terms and will also depend on your body weight)

High Pressure:
pros:
Lower rolling resistance
Less likely to get pinch flats​
cons:
Tire doesn't conform to terrain - less grip getting over rocks
squirrely in corners​

Low Pressure:
pros:
tire can bite on rocks/roots/etc for better climbing performance
tires more stable during cornering(larger contact patch)​
cons:
higher rolling resistance
pinch flats more likely​

Basically, you have to find a compromise between the pros and cons listed above that works well for you. In general, you can run a tire even softer if it is on a suspension (like a front fork or the back of a full suspension bike). The suspension allows you to run lower pressure without increasing the likelihood of pinch flatting because the shock soaks up part of the energy from hits, but again, you're increasing rolling resistance. This is why you often see people running lower pressure on the front tire of a hardtail, because it has suspension. Personally, I opt for better handling over lower rolling resistance.
 

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wipe-out said:
If anyone rides a hardtail with Panaracer Fire XC's, could you tell me what pressure you ride on front and rear.

I'll be riding on technical singletrack most of the time.

Thanks.
155lbs 35 front 40 rear on tech trails. If the roots and rocks are wet I drop em 5. makes a big differance.
 

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Sprocketeer said:
I'm about the same weight as you and ride on Panaracer Trailblasters--which are based on the Fire XC design but I frankly think they're a step up--sorry if that seems blasphemous. At least they're lighter than the Fire XCs.

Anyway, I say you don't have enough pressure in your tires. I run mine at 50 psi. You might even try putting the front tire at 55 psi. I'm not saying this is the gospel, but you should try it. If you're running non-technical trails, twisty singletrack even, you shouldn't have to keep your tires soft and will actually be able to get better performance at a higher pressure.

I say this only in regard to specifically the Panaracer Fire XC and Trailblaster tires though. Both models have excellent grip on the trail and in turns due to the materials, design, and craftspersonship. They don't need to be softened as much as other tires in order to perform well.
I feel the same as sprocketeer. For some reason, i need to run at least 5 pounds more pressure in these tires(fire xc) than all the other tires i am familiar with.
 

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The trails I've been riding tend to have lots of loose sand and gravel. Also lots of off-camber rocky sections. I've been running 25 psi front and rear, for extra grip. Haven't got a pinch flat yet. I'm 160lbs, riding a hardtail. Lots of rock fields too, but drops are only a foot or so. Lots of climbing here in Idaho (4000 feet or more on an average ride)

justen
 

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I rode with a Fire XC as my rear tire for about 2 years, with excellent performance. I would ride 37 lbs in the rear, and 34 lbs in the front (Specialized Team tire). I weigh in just over 200 lbs, but almost never pinch flat so the lower pressure was never a problem. Sometimes I would add 2-4 lbs if it was a really rocky trail, for a long endurance race, or if it hadn't rained for weeks on end... Now I ride full suspension and have switched tires to Continental Explorer Pro tubeless tires at 35 lbs on both ends... East coast trails - some rocks, lots of roots, plenty of loose stuff mixed in with muddy sections.
 
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