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2021 Giant Trance X 29 2
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've had the Giant Trance X for about a month and finally had a chance to take it out today to Valley Forge park in PA. There is a nice trail that goes along the railroad tracks, next to the Schuylkill river. Mostly flat, but there are some very steep sections, punctuated by water-break logs, sunk into the ground. Was out for a couple hours and here's what I learned:
1. Being over 50 and consistently riding a 32 lb. bike uphill is very tiring, even for someone who works out all the time, and actually trains legs hard.
2. The bike handles everything really well but the two guys on E-bikes who effortlessly passed me on the huge hill really pissed me off.
3. Water is great on the trail, but not in a water bottle. That sh*t is going to bounce out. Need a hydration pack.
4. An after-ride lager is amazing.

What are you old geezers doing to maintain consistent energy during rides? Are you carb-loading prior to rides, packing cells with glucose and sucking down electrolytes during rides? Are there any leg-specific exercises which translate to better/stronger riding? All comments welcomed (except 'sell the Trance and buy an e-bike'). Thanks.
 

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GONE
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If I eat anything right before I ride (in the morning) I feel bogged down. So, a cup or two of coffee will get me where I want to go until it's time to stop for a snack for re-energizing. On the night before a bigger ride, I will drink extra water. Electrolyte capsules taken every 45-60 minutes during the ride helps me, too.
 

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Rippin da fAt
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I've had the Giant Trance X for about a month and finally had a chance to take it out today to Valley Forge park in PA. There is a nice trail that goes along the railroad tracks, next to the Schuylkill river. Mostly flat, but there are some very steep sections, punctuated by water-break logs, sunk into the ground. Was out for a couple hours and here's what I learned:
1. Being over 50 and consistently riding a 32 lb. bike uphill is very tiring, even for someone who works out all the time, and actually trains legs hard.
2. The bike handles everything really well but the two guys on E-bikes who effortlessly passed me on the huge hill really pissed me off.
3. Water is great on the trail, but not in a water bottle. That sh*t is going to bounce out. Need a hydration pack.
4. An after-ride lager is amazing.

What are you old geezers doing to maintain consistent energy during rides? Are you carb-loading prior to rides, packing cells with glucose and sucking down electrolytes during rides? Are there any leg-specific exercises which translate to better/stronger riding? All comments welcomed (except 'sell the Trance and buy an e-bike'). Thanks.
Might train legs etc. but change that to a bike in the real world and find out the apples to oranges are indeed different.
Now for the engine swap... Get rid of the 4 cylinder with shot valves and drop in a proper V8, figuratively speaking. In other words, gotsta git out and tune and train to what a bicycle needs from you and you need from the bicycle.

Ebikes are a separate item that down the line, you can become capable of staying with them for the most part however, that is the last concern. Progression in your abilities and endurance are job one, ego has no place since all it does is undo your progress.

Get some time in. Have some adventure with distances and destinations thrown in. Make it a fun thing and it will happen at a better rate too.
 

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Rippin da fAt
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It's going to take more than a month to get in riding shape. Techniques also play a role on energy expenditure.
Fuel economy based on many factors. Riding shape, subjective as that is, is an investment that never offers instant gratification. Spot on!

Ha! I was pissed that my old ass couldn't keep up with them. :)
Too early in the game for that one!

Patience, Grasshoppah...
 

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Keep on Rockin...
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I've had the Giant Trance X for about a month and finally had a chance to take it out today to Valley Forge park in PA. There is a nice trail that goes along the railroad tracks, next to the Schuylkill river. Mostly flat, but there are some very steep sections, punctuated by water-break logs, sunk into the ground. Was out for a couple hours and here's what I learned:
1. Being over 50 and consistently riding a 32 lb. bike uphill is very tiring, even for someone who works out all the time, and actually trains legs hard.
2. The bike handles everything really well but the two guys on E-bikes who effortlessly passed me on the huge hill really pissed me off.
3. Water is great on the trail, but not in a water bottle. That sh*t is going to bounce out. Need a hydration pack.
4. An after-ride lager is amazing.

What are you old geezers doing to maintain consistent energy during rides? Are you carb-loading prior to rides, packing cells with glucose and sucking down electrolytes during rides? Are there any leg-specific exercises which translate to better/stronger riding? All comments welcomed (except 'sell the Trance and buy an e-bike'). Thanks.
Ride steep, technical trails. Lots.
Weight training. Squats deadlifts chins presses.
Jog, run, sprint hills in the slush season.
Eat nothing that comes from a factory
Eat nothing that has an ingredient label
Move a lot, carry heavy things, sleep a lot
Trail work that includes bench cutting and moving heavy things.
 

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“Training” for/in one activity isn’t going to translate to performance in another most times. What translates from one activity to another is overall fitness, but still not apples to apples. To be a good climber on a bike requires heart and lung fitness and lots of time climbing on a bike.

The thing that is more important is the mental training. The right mental approach/understanding to what your body can and can’t do does translate from activity to activity in an apples to apples way. Most people don’t know their actual physical limits, because they listen to that part of their brain that tells them “this is too hard” or “I’m too tired” or “I can’t do that” or you get the point. The difficult thing about learning this is that you have to push past what your brain tells you you can’t do to really find out what your body can do. Most of us can do/tolerate a lot more physically than our brain tells us we can. This is THE factor that separates elite athletes/soldier/performers from the rest of us.

The other thing is hydration. If your urine isn’t clear, copious and frequent, you are actually dehydrated. A small amount of dehydration, like 3%, starts to impact mental and physical performance.

And finally, POST BIKING BEER BLISS is a thing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
"Training" for/in one activity isn't going to translate to performance in another most times. What translates from one activity to another is overall fitness, but still not apples to apples. To be a good climber on a bike requires heart and lung fitness and lots of time climbing on a bike.

The thing that is more important is the mental training. The right mental approach/understanding to what your body can and can't do does translate from activity to activity in an apples to apples way. Most people don't know their actual physical limits, because they listen to that part of their brain that tells them "this is too hard" or "I'm too tired" or "I can't do that" or you get the point. The difficult thing about learning this is that you have to push past what your brain tells you you can't do to really find out what your body can do. Most of us can do/tolerate a lot more physically than our brain tells us we can. This is THE factor that separates elite athletes/soldier/performers from the rest of us.

The other thing is hydration. If your urine isn't clear, copious and frequent, you are actually dehydrated. A small amount of dehydration, like 3%, starts to impact mental and physical performance.

And finally, POST BIKING BEER BLISS is a thing.
"Most people don't know their actual physical limits, because they listen to that part of their brain that tells them "this is too hard" or "I'm too tired" or "I can't do that" or you get the point." - Completely agree that a lot of this is a 'mental thing'. The body is capable of so much more than we put on it. If anyone wants to read a great book about this subject, I recommend: Spiritual Journey of Joseph L. Greenstein: The Mighty Atom: Spielman, Ed: 9781885440303: Amazon.com: Books

+1 for the post biking beer bliss. :)
 

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I'm not over 50 yet, at 44 years old, but I feel you. Luckily, my wife tells me I have to start somewhere and keep getting out. It doesn't help that I am carrying 8 lbs from working from home during COVID and can't get out because I have a 1 and 4 year old with me.
 

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As others have said. Weight training makes a huge difference...of course if you try to ride the day after a leg workout, expect ssssllllloooowwwness. Weight training your upper body helps as well...stabilizes you on the bike and helps prevent serious injuries on the inevitable crashes.
 

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You need to stay well hydrated, especially leading up to a ride. If it's hot, a bottle with electrolyte mix is a good thing, along with regular h2o, I eat something like a PB&banana sandwich about an hour before a ride. Unless the ride gets over 2-3 hrs, that is usually plenty of fuel for me, but if it is longer, I snack on a little trail mix I always bring.

Nothing is going to make you better at riding, than getting out riding. You can do squats, or whatever, but nothing beats turning the cranks a few times a week, every week... and it's more fun. Cycling legs are a real thing. Throw in a really long ride every now and again, and you'll be having more fun than suffering in a couple of months. Though the old saying - it never gets easier, you just go faster.

If you don't already, you need to start doing regular core strengthening exercises, and cycling stretches/ yoga. < This is what will inevitably bite you in the ass, if you don't.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Day Two: I went out today and rode a local trail near Valley Forge. Some good uphills and some nice flats through fields and woods. Felt better than yesterday. Got some good practice bunny hopping since Hurricane Ida put a ton of stuff in the trails. Picked up a hydration pack so I was able to suck a lot of water. Agree with everyone who says to keep working out and have a strong core - Right there with you on that: I've been a regular weight lifter and martial artist since the late '80s so I have a good foundation. Just need to 'keep pedalling'. Thanks everyone!!
 

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A couple of years shy of 50 here and got back into riding about a year ago, on the same bike as you. :)
For longer rides, I load up in the morning with whole wheat bread, peanut butter, bananas and coffee. Carry a 12oz bottle with electrolyte that I drink from whenever I stop and a camelback for water.
Halfway through the ride, 1.5-2h in, I stop for another banana and an energy bar, which is enough to get me through a trail day around here in NorCal.
Back at the car, I usually have some extra food, like jerky, that I'll eat on my way back home.

If your bottle bounces out, get a better holder. Ive never lost mine going down double diamonds or hitting jumps. It's even survived a couple of good crashes :D
 

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Nothing like a giant bag of water on your back to keep that prostate pancake-shaped.

I don't ride before taking a solid, caffeine-induced dump. A couple of hundred calories 40 minutes before pedaling, and a few Gu-Packs for anything past 2 hours.
 

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This summer I also started carrying a bottle with electrolyte along with water in my Camelbak. And I had to get a better cage for one of my bikes as it kept bouncing out. I don't eat anything different before rides, my usual cereal with fruit and coffee (resulting in the same as D. Ino). And then a ClifBar during a break.

One of my first long adventure rides was from my apartment in Chestnut Hill to Valley Forge! That was in 1995. I fell asleep at the park.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Nothing like a giant bag of water on your back to keep that prostate pancake-shaped.

I don't ride before taking a solid, caffeine-induced dump. A couple of hundred calories 40 minutes before pedaling, and a few Gu-Packs for anything past 2 hours.
Can I just chew on expresso beans and drink warm water from my hydration pack for energy? :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
This summer I also started carrying a bottle with electrolyte along with water in my Camelbak. And I had to get a better cage for one of my bikes as it kept bouncing out. I don't eat anything different before rides, my usual cereal with fruit and coffee (resulting in the same as D. Ino). And then a ClifBar during a break.

One of my first long adventure rides was from my apartment in Chestnut Hill to Valley Forge! That was in 1995. I fell asleep at the park.
Chestnut Hill to VF is a good ride. Not surprised you fell asleep! If you're still in the area, let me know and we'll schedule a ride.
My current cage is just a little large for my older Sigg water bottle (which I got in the '90s and won't die), so I may get a slightly fatter water bottle and put electrolytes in that (or swap the cage from my old Schwinn MTB which holds that water bottle well).
 
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