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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm a big back-sweater and an on-trail minimalist, so waist packs have appealed to me ever since they started coming into fashion. Problem was, I'd tried on several different waist hydration packs and never found one that didn't dig into my belly. (For reference, I'm 6'6", 275ish with a 38-40 inch waist, I wear XXL in pretty much everything.

I could barely buckle the Dakine one I tried on and the Camelbak one I'd checked out dug into my stomach when pedaling. ) But I think I've found a keeper with this Osprey Seral I picked up a couple of weeks ago.

The waist belt is bike-specific, so it's not the most comfortable for standing around (and I definitely wouldn't wear it hiking) but when seated on the bike or standing in the attack position it feels quite comfy and doesn't move around at all. I've read they flipped their standard backpacking waistbelt upside-down for the early prototypes, and you can kind of see it when looking at the bag's profile.

There's also plenty of room in the waist belt, even with my sizable frame, so it may be usable by guys bigger than me. It really does a good job of putting the weight on your hips and I haven't noticed the strap digging into my belly at all on my first few rides with it.

The one thing I will say about sizing is the hydration hose is designed to go around your front alongside the waist belt, and it juuust barely connects to its magnetic attachment point on the main body of the bag when wrapped around my midsection. So if you're bigger around than I am, the mouthpiece might not reach to its magnetic anchor point. However, it does seem like it would be pretty easy to add a magnetic anchor point further out on the waist belt (using magnets from a hobby store) to accommodate riders who are bigger around the middle.

Water capacity is listed as 1.5L, however I measured the amount I was putting in with a Nalgene and it seemed like it was all the way up to the max fill line after just over 1L. But when combined with a bottle on my frame, I have plenty of water for mid-length rides when one bottle isn't enough but a full backpack is overkill.

Overall I'd give it 4 out of 5 stars for the great waist belt design and overall comfort. I'll try to post some detailed pics when I get home...as of now I'm killing time in the office.

TL;DR: If you're a bigger guy who's tired of carrying a backpack, but has also shied away from waistpacks due to fit issues, this one is worth trying on.
 

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Thanks for sharing your thoughts on this. I tried the Evoc hip pack and didn’t get along with it well, ended up returning it. I’ll check out the osprey next as my Wingnut pack is a little big for short rides.

How does it carry when loaded up? Any bouncing or sliding around?


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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
How does it carry when loaded up? Any bouncing or sliding around?
It's stayed totally rock-solid for me so far. No bouncing or sliding or creeping whatsoever. It actually helps prevent plumbers-butt as it keeps my jersey and shorts in place when I have it tightened down, haha.

I haven't fully loaded it up with tons of snacks/rain shell/etc but I'm headed to Fruita tomorrow so I'll be putting it through further testing. :cool:

I also like that there are compression straps (accessible while wearing the bag) that help you tighten it down to accommodate varying amounts of stuff on different rides.
 

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It's stayed totally rock-solid for me so far. No bouncing or sliding or creeping whatsoever. It actually helps prevent plumbers-butt as it keeps my jersey and shorts in place when I have it tightened down, haha.

I haven't fully loaded it up with tons of snacks/rain shell/etc but I'm headed to Fruita tomorrow so I'll be putting it through further testing. :cool:

I also like that there are compression straps (accessible while wearing the bag) that help you tighten it down to accommodate varying amounts of stuff on different rides.
Let us know how it works loaded up out in Fruita. Sounds like an awesome time!

As a clyde (280lbs) I can endorse the Osprey Savu (bottles x2 instead of bladder) also, both great packs. Thanks for the review
Is there any reason you went with the bottles vs bladder? I like that the Savu can hold two bottles, one would never be enough for me. I can drink through liter and a half in an hour on a warm day.
 

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As far as the Camelbak, I was skeptical of the reviews. Things were not adding up to me in the way the claimed fit size compared to review sizes. I ordered a CamelBak Repack LR 4 earlier this month. When I opened the package and tried it on, I felt like I made a mistake for ordering it. It seem to fit just as everyone was saying, and I didn't put any water in yet. I sorta tossed it aside and planned to return it.

A few days later I was about to go on a simple ride and was curious to give it another try. This time I had room, which needed to be pulled tight(with water in bladder) on me. I had extra room for the wrap around tube, which I am not fond of.

The only difference for me was the first time I tired it on, I was wearing street cloths. When it fitted properly I was wearing my MTB gear.

I do not like the wrap around tube, it takes away the ease of drinking while riding. I had to stop and drink. I do have a guy, and trying to figure out where the damn magnet was really gotten on my nerve.

I'm going to figure out an easier way to use the tube. Knowing me, once I figure out Its not going to work, it will be too late to return.
 

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Did a ride with the Osprey Seral pack today instead of using my Camelbak mule lr. The Seral easily fit the hydration pack, tool roll, spare tube, some snacks (4 or 5 cliff bars), keys and a small hand pump inside. The only issue i have with the Seral was the magnetic anchor point for the mouthpiece..i didn't think the mouthpiece would stay put during the ride so i enden up sticking it through a loop attached to one of the zippers. It stayed put that way but getting a drink was kind of a pita...
 

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I use the seral as well for shorter rides. I carry a spare pump (co2/pump), toolroll from my raptor pack, multi tool, first aid kit, phone, keys, wallet, protein bars. Works well but had the same issue with the magnetic holder. Instead i stick the mouthpiece in the pocket on that waist side and zip it.
 

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For the Camelbak wraparound tube, I have a retractable pass holder fastened just behind the bite valve, run the hose across my front and fasten the pass holder clip to the Camelbak. The hose is out of the way, can drink as I ride and it returns when I let go.
 

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For the Camelbak wraparound tube, I have a retractable pass holder fastened just behind the bite valve, run the hose across my front and fasten the pass holder clip to the Camelbak. The hose is out of the way, can drink as I ride and it returns when I let go.
:thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:

That is how I had my backpack, and I tired it with this hip pack. I'm not sure why it didn't work this time. Possibly could be the retractable holder was old, or the weight of the bigger tube was too much. or it might been too much stress from needing to pull it so far away and releasing it.

I actually been considering a heavy duty retractable holder, and somehow not having it go across my belly. :)

*************EDIT***********
After typing that, I just remembered I have a few old lanyard neck straps in my desk. I believe I will try one of those.

**** edit

The Lanyard neck strap was perfect. I'm not sure where I gotten it from or else I would post where to get what I have. The neck strap is a break away for safety purposes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
After a couple of weekends in a row riding in the desert, I’m pretty much in love with this thing. The magnet on the hydration hose has stayed put through plenty of rocky ledgy stuff, and bouncing has been minimal—certainly much less than with a backpack. The well-designed compression and waist straps make it easy to keep the fit snug as you decrease the volume of water in the bladder.

It’s got more than enough room for a layer, plenty of snacks, and your keys and phone. My tools/emergency tube/CO2 etc are strapped to my seat via a Dakine Gripper, but you could likely squeeze that stuff in as well. Combining this with a large-capacity bottle on my frame, I don’t see myself using a full-size hydration pack for anything but the longest, hottest rides now.
 

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For the camelback I called camel back and asked them for another holder, I then sewed it on closer so I did not have to pull the tube as much.

I still find sometimes it falls away. I am going to experiment with the pass holder, or the lanyard
 
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