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I'm running a 170 mm Lyric. Decreasing travel on the front end will do two things I don't want to happen....steepen the seat tube angle and lower the bottom bracket. I've recently settled on running the shock at around 30% sag for a more reasonable set tube angle. But I thinking that reducing head angle by 1° will raise the bb, increase stack, shorten the wheelbase a hair, while giving me a little more reach. I also think this will help me weight the front end of the bike easier and promote faster side to side angulation during tight, fast turns.
 

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What rear shock are you running ? And what's your concern with the BB height ?. Keep in mind also all quarter geo on the LA was with a fork at 160mm . They never changed any of the info and the bike launched at 160. I only brought it up because running the bike at both travels on the same fork 170 was immediately worse at everything. I'm definitely not an expert . But I've ran my LA Sal in a ton of configurations.
 

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Thank you for pointing out the changes in stock fork travel. I didn't realize that these now come stock with 170 mm forks, and you are correct, mine came stock 160 mm. So, given that info, I'm definitely not interested in running down to 150 mm. Enurjetik was apparently pondering the same thing , post #323 pg 17 of this thread, about an angleset to reduce HTA as well. The below quote in italics is from the wolf tooth components page for their angleset, and seems to be in line with what I'm considering. While I do have immediate access to some incredible downhill trails with extended descents, interspersed with these trails are super fun techy and tight twisting trails. While I may give up some mach speed performance (but then again, a 160 mm fork at 66° is no slouch) I think I might have a better all around bike. Think rolling chunky terrain like gooseberry, or rolling punchy terrain in Moab. Is 64-65° really a benefit there? I wish I had a headset press.

Conversely, let’s say you have a bike that was originally designed for stability in high-speed descents, such as a modern enduro or all-mountain bike. Let’s also say that you most often ride in a place where extended high-speed descents are a rarity, let’s say east-central Minnesota. Trails around the Twin Cities tend to be more tight and twisty, a less wide-open high speed. Enduro or all-mountain bikes can feel “over-biked” - that is, the geometry built for flying down mountains can prove cumbersome on flatter, rolling, or more technical terrain. A +1° head angle change will decrease the steering stability by 5-7%. It will also bring the front wheel closer to you, shortening the overall wheelbase and placing more of your weight on the front tire. This is beneficial where quick steering with maximum front wheel traction is required.
 
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