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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay so as title says im a bit of a noob. Its been 12 years since iv rode a mtn bike. Ive been seein 26 27.5 and 29ers one thing I don't understand is the 650b ,I can't see how it would be very noticeable.

Second question. Steel vs aluminum vs carbon. Okay okay yes steel is obviously heavy. Aluminum is light and strong. Carbon is very light and strong I get that. However from instances ive seen whew someone crashes carbon isnt the best for impacts like that. So why use a full carbon bike? Unlesd your sponsored and get free stuff.

Aluminum can be just as light in most cases using the right type aluminum and can take a bit more of a beating. Now excuse me if im totally ignorant but if I'm wrong in any of this please help me understand. Thanks.

Oh btw my name carbonfever is just a name lol I use no carbon parts
 

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The best way to see the differences between wheel sizes is to go out and ride a few different bikes. Check with your local bike shops to see what demo bikes they have, but even on a spin around the parking lot you should be able to notice some difference (although the amount of time it's been since you've been on a mountain bike might make that harder). I can notice a difference between my 26er and the 650b bikes I've ridden and it's a difference I like.

You're generally right when it comes to frame materials. Aluminum is a standard material because it's a nice balance of strength, weight, and cost. Good steel likely isn't as heavy as you think. Steel frames eat up more vibrations and small bumps than aluminum frames do which makes steel a nice option for hard tails. Definitely wouldn't rule out steel if you're looking to pick up a hardtail. Carbon is the lightweight option that comes with a hefty price tag. Obviously with a lighter bike you're able to climb better and keep momentum going easier. There is certainly a place and argument for carbon bikes/parts, and again they would likely have more impact resistance than you're thinking especially if you haven't been on a mountain bike in a while.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ive just heard horror stories. Guy racing with a carbon fram crashed . Bike seemed ok the later on in the race the frame tore apart through some areas less brutal than what he had been through. I can see carbon on road bikes for vibration and esp wheels easier to spin. Idk its hard for me to intrust my life with carbon racing dh on a single track and it snap. Then again I suppose that could happen with an material.

I got this 3 series trek just for a commuter mainly. Took it on a st yesterday , now im hooked. Im def doing to get a fs 29er . Fs is so much easier on the body taking them roots etc. Last mtb I had was a silver gary fisher fs aluminum before trek bought them out. Lol if that gives you an idea. Oh ya I forgot to mention ti frames. Light definitely durable but holy hell the cost is nuts
 
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