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I always bleed like this.
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK, please do not post any BB7 vs hydro comments. I have been very satisfied with my BB7's. I like'em lots. My BB7's stop me fine for the most part, they are one finger most of the time for me even at 230lbs, sans bike and equipment. However, they cause me issues some times that I just can't mull out and I am ready to make the jump, if the price is right.

That said, lots of good deals on the older Shimano 765's. I know there is newer everything out there but I am considering the jump and wanted to know if going with a well priced ~$100 or so set of 765's over more expensive anything else is worth it coming from BB7's? Do I need to spend $200 to get a real upgrade or can I make it in that lower price range? I am in the Midwest, I don't need 30minutes of downhill no fade breaking, I want good modulation and touch on the tight, twisty single track.
 

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BB7 are good brakes. I think they rival many hydos, especially in value.

What are your issues? Do you have the speed dial levers? They are a great addition to the bb7s and are only $40 IIRC. I even put a set on my daughter's bike.

You could always look used. If the used ones are recently bled, and have new pads, they can be great.
 

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There is not much point in going from BB7s to cheap hydros. You gain nothing except a headache. Upgrading to decent Magura or Formula brakes at about $200 a wheel would be worth it.

I have recently been contemplating running a Formula on the front on a 185mm rotor and a BB7 on the back with a 160mm.

Why not upgrade your BB7 cable housing, cable, pads, rotor or lever if you are unsatisfied with your current BB7 set up.
 

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Bike to the Bone...
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8,290 Posts
Also, check the Elixir R, I just ordered a pair at 95 bucks per wheel at chain reaction.

I got the 8 and 7 inch rotors which were low on price, 6" rotors are a little more expensive, but I'm thinking that you could use your existing rotors,..

http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Models.aspx?ModelID=29728

I haven't got them yet, so I can't say if they're good or bad, but at least there's another option.

I have the BB7 and Magura Louises BAT (2008), and I do feel a difference, the Louises feeling better than the BB7.
 

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Riding dirt since 1970
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Can't really speak to the hydros. BB7s have been bullet proof for the past 8 years, including DH trips. Avid Ultimate levers and Jagwire Ripcord housing make for very smooth, powerful, reliable and PITA-free braking. I've recently speced them on V10c & Nomad c builds.
 

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PoorBehavior said:
OK, please do not post any BB7 vs hydro comments. I have been very satisfied with my BB7's. I like'em lots. My BB7's stop me fine for the most part, they are one finger most of the time for me even at 230lbs, sans bike and equipment. However, they cause me issues some times that I just can't mull out and I am ready to make the jump, if the price is right.

That said, lots of good deals on the older Shimano 765's. I know there is newer everything out there but I am considering the jump and wanted to know if going with a well priced ~$100 or so set of 765's over more expensive anything else is worth it coming from BB7's? Do I need to spend $200 to get a real upgrade or can I make it in that lower price range? I am in the Midwest, I don't need 30minutes of downhill no fade breaking, I want good modulation and touch on the tight, twisty single track.
The M765, while a bit dated, is a good brake. They are relatively easy to bleed, and easy to maintain, and parts are still readily available for them. Caliper adjustment and set up can be a bit more finicky than with the Avid CPS system, but as long as the frame and fork are properly preped, it's not a huge problem. By properly preped I mean that the IS tabs on the frame (and fork if it is an IS mount type) should be properly faced so that they are flat and concentric to one another. The standard caliper mounting system that most manufacturers use is a bit more sensitive to tab thickness variations than the CPS system. Anyway, the 765s should give you what you are looking for, as will just about any other quality hydraulic braking system. Anyway, no you don't have to spend $200 a wheel to get quality hydraulic brakes. Some of the "older" systems like the 765, Juicy 7, Older Formula systems, etc. can be had for under $200 and are still solid viable brakes. They may not have all the adjustment do-dads on them, but they are still strong reliable performers.

Good Dirt
 

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I always bleed like this.
Joined
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496 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Squash said:
The M765, while a bit dated, is a good brake. They are relatively easy to bleed, and easy to maintain, and parts are still readily available for them. Caliper adjustment and set up can be a bit more finicky than with the Avid CPS system, but as long as the frame and fork are properly preped, it's not a huge problem. By properly preped I mean that the IS tabs on the frame (and fork if it is an IS mount type) should be properly faced so that they are flat and concentric to one another. The standard caliper mounting system that most manufacturers use is a bit more sensitive to tab thickness variations than the CPS system. Anyway, the 765s should give you what you are looking for, as will just about any other quality hydraulic braking system. Anyway, no you don't have to spend $200 a wheel to get quality hydraulic brakes. Some of the "older" systems like the 765, Juicy 7, Older Formula systems, etc. can be had for under $200 and are still solid viable brakes. They may not have all the adjustment do-dads on them, but they are still strong reliable performers.

Good Dirt
Squash, thanks. That's the info I was looking for.
 
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