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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I rode the BCT yesterday and saw about 8 fat bikes hitting the trails. They looked pretty sweet!

I know the fat bikes would be great for soft sand like the beach or in the snow.

My question is, is it necessary on the local trails. It seems to me it might be difficult to roll all that tire up and down the hills.

Can the folks that ride the fat bikes on the local Phoenix trails chime in as to why you chose a fat bike over a traditional bike?
What are the pros and cons while riding the hard packed trails in the Phoenix area?
 

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I rode the BCT yesterday and saw about 8 fat bikes hitting the trails. They looked pretty sweet!

I know the fat bikes would be great for soft sand like the beach or in the snow.

My question is, is it necessary on the local trails. It seems to me it might be difficult to roll all that tire up and down the hills.

Can the folks that ride the fat bikes on the local Phoenix trails chime in as to why you chose a fat bike over a traditional bike?
What are the pros and cons while riding the hard packed trails in the Phoenix area?
Let me guess, you don't own a pair of skinny jeans either.
 

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I do not own a fat bike, but I do have a Surly Krampus which is a 29+. Fat bike, much like all of the other bike types out there are a personal preference rather than a +- advantage choice for trails other than sand and snow. I bought my Krampus with the intent of a something different to ride every now and then. It is now my primary ride for everything short of the extremely rocky trails, being fully rigid it is too harsh for me on the chunk.

It is definitely more work on climbs but is actually faster than my fs bike on the flats and slightly descending trails. It's like riding an oversized BMX bike. I may have to get me some skinny jeans.

I have also taken the Krampus on bike packing trips, definitely a great choice for that type of riding. Oh, and flat pedals are mandatory on fat bikes, probably has something to do with the skinny jeans.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
As for skinny jeans, not just no but hell no. No straight bill hats, monster stickers or EDM for me.
Not sure what all that has to do with fat bikes, but ill take it with a grain of salt.
 

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a fat bikI do not owne, but I do have a Surly Krampus which is a 29+. .
Thread hijack: Please tell me more about your Krampus. Reason being, I owned a KM for a long time and loved that bike. Prior to AZ, I rode that bike 99% of the time and loved rigid, 29 and single. Then I moved next to South mountain. A few trips down national and it started to site in my garage. Then I sold my full squish and put a Reba on the KM. Back to being my 99% bike.

yadda yadda yadda - I loved that bike. I wanted another but for whatever reason ended with something different.

Every so often I think about a krampus - then I remember I nearly quit riding my surly when it was rigid.

So - any thoughts on qualit of tires out there? Do they stand up to sharp granite? How often do you wish you had a squishy front? never? Is this your only bike, or part of the stable?
 

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Not sure what all that has to do with fat bikes, but ill take it with a grain of salt.
I think CO was trying to insinuate that people on fat bikes are hipster d-bags. That's how I read it anyways...
 

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Thread hijack: Please tell me more about your Krampus. A few trips down national and it started to site in my garage. Then I sold my full squish and put a Reba on the KM. Back to being my 99% bike.

Every so often I think about a krampus - then I remember I nearly quit riding my surly when it was rigid.

So - any thoughts on qualit of tires out there? Do they stand up to sharp granite? How often do you wish you had a squishy front? never? Is this your only bike, or part of the stable?
I also own a FS XC bike, dirt jumper, DH bike and a road bike. Sold my SS and AM bikes but may replace them someday.

Tire selection is the biggest issue for 29+ right now, the Knard is the only available 3x29 tire for now and it is horrible for our desert riding. For rocky chunky trails I go for the FS bike. Don't plan on putting a suspension fork on the Krampus, that is why I have a FS bike.
 

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If you want to go slower, choose a fat bike.

To have any "bump absorption" you've got to take the pressure way down, it works fine on snow, but on dirt it's way too soft and you have trouble turning, steering and pedaling is like dragging a wet mattress, especially when out of the saddle. At any reasonable pressure it feels and rides like a rigid bike (because it is). This is a common misconception due to people thinking 4" tires=4" suspension.

They do work fantastic on semi-packed and packed snow trails. Many places don't really have these and people that go out and snow-shoe/ski on the trails to pack them down, let alone snow during all of winter. At other times when it just snowed a few inches it's not really worth it to take out the fat bike, and it won't handle 12" dumps or anything either.

Fatbikes can be fun, but you don't ride them to go fast with 20lbs of wheels and tires. Acceleration is slow and you seem to pedal a lot without going much of anywhere. Nothing works as well as a fatbike in the right snow conditions and beach-sand seems to be another area where they excel (although I've tried really loose sand and they won't do that).
 

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If you are looking for a more do-it-all kind of rig don't get a fat bike. If you can afford the novelty and like riding in snow then sure, why not. Other than that tho.......meh.
 

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parenting for gnarness
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i ride mine at the beach, or when i'm drunk and want something that cant fall over. Hate it for anything but the easiest trails. ymmv.
 

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I ride a fat bike year round in all conditions and love it. I rode in the Prescott Monstercross last weekend, Whiskey Offroad race, the Skull Valley Loop Challenge, and so much more. It is a personal preference as with most bikes and the rider will ultimately determine the ability of the bike. The fat bike is not for everyone but I would recommend you give it a good try before writing them off.

whiskeyrace.jpg
 

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I thought I heard someone on a fat bike was the first to finish the 71 mile Prescott Monstercrosss?

Also, I ride with the winkster and fat and slow do not go together.
 

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I ride a fat bike year round in all conditions and love it. I rode in the Prescott Monstercross last weekend, Whiskey Offroad race, the Skull Valley Loop Challenge, and so much more. It is a personal preference as with most bikes and the rider will ultimately determine the ability of the bike. The fat bike is not for everyone but I would recommend you give it a good try before writing them off.

View attachment 883449
BS! This is defiantly Photoshopped. Where are your fake Buddy Holly glasses and Chrome messenger bag?
 

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I rode the BCT yesterday and saw about 8 fat bikes hitting the trails. They looked pretty sweet!

I know the fat bikes would be great for soft sand like the beach or in the snow.

My question is, is it necessary on the local trails. It seems to me it might be difficult to roll all that tire up and down the hills.

Can the folks that ride the fat bikes on the local Phoenix trails chime in as to why you chose a fat bike over a traditional bike?
What are the pros and cons while riding the hard packed trails in the Phoenix area?
I ride a half fat jones in Tucson for my main bike. it is a swapable set up that I can put a 29er front on when i feel like it. I swap back and forth as need. I love to use it out at Star Pass and on Mt Lemmon trails. It has amazing traction, so amazing, but it is a rigid bike. It doesn't feel like a suspension bike, but it feels less rigid than when the 29er tire is one. However the 29er wheel makes me realize I can manual much better and accelerate better. I dislike the fat tire on trails like fantasy island, snake desert trails with little technical and lots of turns, deceleration and accelerations points.

The huge draw back is that they tires make Schwable tires look like a great deal, they are hard-ish to set up tubeless and they need a special tube which is huge and you have to carry with you in case you cut a side wall. Plus they are seriously heavy and the lighter models are seriously $200.

Another thing is my Jones is designed to be a rigid AM style bike but most fat bikes are designed to be XC style or touring style bikes. Not AM bikes. I properly equipped AM style fat bike would be pretty sweet but current fat bikes are just not there yet.
 

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I thought I heard someone on a fat bike was the first to finish the 71 mile Prescott Monstercrosss?

Also, I ride with the winkster and fat and slow do not go together.
Yup. We saw Steve Reynolds finish first on his rigid fat bike. And he was still grinning. Something wrong with that boy...
 

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slower than you
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love me some fat!

i ride my pugs as often as i ride my fs-29er, or my rigid singlespeed, or my hardtails, or my crossbike, or my fixie, or my my commuter, or my cruisers. now and then i even ride a mountain-uni around, too.

far as i'm concerned each bike is rad in its own way.
 

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BS! This is defiantly Photoshopped. Where are your fake Buddy Holly glasses and Chrome messenger bag?
And notice how there's no one behind him? Because everyone is way back choking on that huge dust cloud!

Fat bikes: the coal-rolling Cummins of MTB
 
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