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This place needs an enema
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Give it a few more years and there will be no such thing as a skinny tyred mtb.
While the trend seems to be swinging that way, and while 'skinny' is subjective, I predict the opposite: That many of the people that have swung theirownselves onto this bandwagon will realize it doesn't suit the riding they most often do: Hardpack. As such they'll go back to normal mtb rims/tires, and will be happier/faster (if that's what they're after) and with more money in their wallets.

I love fatbikes, and I ride them were appropriate, but I think the collective marketing juggernaut has forced them down the throats of way too wide a demographic.
 

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29+ i what most fatbike wants would be better off riding for regular xc stuff, well here in the UK anyway,
Marketing would say otherwise, the manufacturers will move to 29+ once everyone has bought into fat

When i see full suspension 4" tyre fatbikes taking over at Downhill and riding the likes of Anoch Mor (Ft William) here in Scotland which is regaurded as the longest and hardest of the UCI Down hill tracks then i will be a believer, but that won`t happen as they are just too slow and not flickable enough in this type of riding...

Hence the 650b wheel size meeting the ideal float/flickable best suited for extreme stuff... :)
 

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While the trend seems to be swinging that way, and while 'skinny' is subjective, I predict the opposite: That many of the people that have swung theirownselves onto this bandwagon will realize it doesn't suit the riding they most often do: Hardpack. As such they'll go back to normal mtb rims/tires, and will be happier/faster (if that's what they're after) and with more money in their wallets.

I love fatbikes, and I ride them were appropriate, but I think the collective marketing juggernaut has forced them down the throats of way too wide a demographic.
I'm not so sure about this. The growth seems pretty organic to me. Other than Surly and Salsa, the manufacturers seem like the real bandwagoneers, only jumping in after seeing several years of demand from the buying public. Many of them appear to be doing it halfheartedly, as if they're worried that fatbikes will cannibalize sales of their regular bikes. Same with most of the shops here in the Northeast.

I'm sure there are lots of riders who bought fatbikes because they look cool or because they wanted to get in on the "fad", but I see way more riders who dismiss fatbikes because they look slow or just comical. Most of these people have never ridden one.

I'm 3 years in now on my fatbike, and have no desire to ride skinny. I finally got to ride plenty of snow this year, and while it was fun, I prefer dirt, roots and rocks. In the end, it's just a tire size, and we'll soon have a continuum of 1.75-5.0" tires of various diameters to choose from. I think the term "fatbike" will lose its meaning when that happens. So far, the "original" 3.8" tire hits my sweet spot, but I'd love to try a 27.5 in a 3.2" width if/when that comes out.
 

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I predict the opposite: That many of the people that have swung theirownselves onto this bandwagon will realize it doesn't suit the riding they most often do: Hardpack.
Are you nuts? I love my fatty on just about all surfaces.

The only scenario where I find it less fun is this: rough terrain at high speed. But besides that I find myself going fat over skinny more often than not.
 

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I'm cross-posting, but riding a really flickable fat bike (carbon Beargrease) has my HT and FS 29ers and 26ers gathering dust, even after the snow is gone and hardpack is the order of the day. I'm getting a 29+ soon, so maybe that will eventually the roost for summer riding.
 

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Yeah!
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I don't believe fatbike as a term to describe a type of bike will ever die out because of the frame differences required to ride truly fat. Regular tires on a bike designed for fat tires looks strange, and people will always clamor for the streamlined look (compared to fatbikes). There would be never ending discussions on weight and strength penalties for "going fat", etc.

Riding fatbikes on hardpack... might be on to something there. Just need a bit more psi... A fat tire providing hella traction with not much rolling penatly on flowy trail? They've come up with solutions for much more complicated issues the past two decades.
 

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Having just come from a full winter with Bud up front, and now moving to my 2.4 Purgatory (basically a 23c haha) I can say that the lazy rider will love the fat bike. You don't even really need to worry about picking a line, or staying in the middle of the trails with tires that size. Just point and shoot, let the tires be your guide.
 

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dumb ass
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While the trend seems to be swinging that way, and while 'skinny' is subjective, I predict the opposite: That many of the people that have swung theirownselves onto this bandwagon will realize it doesn't suit the riding they most often do: Hardpack. As such they'll go back to normal mtb rims/tires, and will be happier/faster (if that's what they're after) and with more money in their wallets.

I love fatbikes, and I ride them were appropriate, but I think the collective marketing juggernaut has forced them down the throats of way too wide a demographic.
I agree.
 

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While the trend seems to be swinging that way, and while 'skinny' is subjective, I predict the opposite: That many of the people that have swung theirownselves onto this bandwagon will realize it doesn't suit the riding they most often do: Hardpack. As such they'll go back to normal mtb rims/tires, and will be happier/faster (if that's what they're after) and with more money in their wallets.

I love fatbikes, and I ride them were appropriate, but I think the collective marketing juggernaut has forced them down the throats of way too wide a demographic.
I'm "old" (53 this year...) so I remember all the "hype" surrounding the "fad" of 2"-wide "mountain bikes"... I finally got a 4"-tired "fat-bike" w/the new Mongoose Dolomite - yep, cheap ($225), mass-market, sorta crappy - BUT they're consistently sold-out - BikesDirect offerings are affordable as well... This is NOT just a flash-in-the-pan sort of thing. The market "votes" w/what sells - highly specialized & technical downhill type machines are what is truly "niche" vs. comfortable riding provided by a go-anywhere & affordable option... Just a bit of historical perspective - "vive la difference!" :)
 
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