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sean salach said:
The little snippet on there mentions, "After the success of the Antarctic expedition.....", but I've been having trouble locating anything that tells just how 'successful' it was. Lot's of press releases talking about how Stoup tested it and planned to use it, but none that I can find stating that the expedition ever happened. Anyone have any info?


Looks as though Stoup moved back to skis and snowshoes not long after the initial test.
http://www.iceaxe.tv/expeditions/archive/
A friend of mine was working in Antarctica as a diesel mechanic at the time ( now works a few weeks on/few weeks off on the pipeline corridor). He said, and I quote "that didn't go so well". He didn't elaborate a whole lot but I expect the bike didn't work as well as expected. The first Hanebrinks were set up a little different than the later more "produced" units. They used a taller, wider tire and way wider rim. The rim was made from an aluminum ATV rim w/ the center cut out and alu sides welded on to carry the bearing/axle assembly and the tire was a custom "grooved" Atv unit as well. The early rims were something like 8 inches wide and, along with the slightly bigger tire, had better floatation than the late model Hanebrink that Stoup was using. The early stuff proved to be too labor/cost intensive to produce in numbers and I suspect they didn't work so well on anything BUT sand or snow. I also suspect that some of the early owners were disappointed in it's performance on trails & etc... especially considering the price. The later models used a 4 inch wheel (produced for Hanebrink) and a Grooved Duro turf tire. Much cheaper to produce; better steering & etc. for all around dirt riding (possibly more appealing to the masses) but not as good for floatation. The early models(and the in between models) also used a jackshaft system to clear the larger tires and straighten up the chain line which also gave the owner the option of adjusting the gearing by changing the intermediate gear. This also proved to be a hassle to produce in numbers. The narrower tire/wheel set-up also allowed them to do away with the jack shaft in leu of a wider bottom bracket to take care of the chain line. And, these changes also saved some weight. Mine is an "in between" model with the older style frame w/ jackshaft but the smaller,narrower tires and wheels. Mostly shot when I bought it, I did ride it at the beach a couple of times before I disassembled it. the smaller tires combined with the long wheelbase did NOT work as well as I had hoped! and when I tried to lower the pressure things went from not so good to worse. The narrow rims made them feel like flat tires instead of floatation tires! The early promotional pictures and articles show the larger tired/wider rimed versions riding dunes and snow but I havn't seen pictures of the later models doing much more than packed beach sand or etc... Since Stoup was mounted on the later version, I'm guessin' the expedition didn't get too far! Since my frame is the early style (with clearance for ALOT bigger tire) I hope to someday get some appropriate Douglas blue label atv rims, have someone machine me some axel assemblies and make my own fork to breath some life into the old thing. Should be fun to haul beer to the beach fire ... but I can't imagine it even competing with our "evolved" fat-bikes.

Cheers!
-Ward
 

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OR Homegrown Dune Bikey

I was on a CL outing about a month ago to buy a bike, well a Velo Solex truth be known. I had to travel 5 hrs. down the coast to pick it up, although it was listed on the OR coast CL which covers alot of ground actually, and while consummating the deal we got to talking about sand biking because in that area of the coast there are alot of sand dunes.

The guy started talking about a buddy that had a bike he used to go beach combing with and the fact that he never rides it anymore, it just sits in his garage etc, etc. Well of course the next garage I am at is that guys and ended up getting this bike, sorry for the crappy pic.
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His story was that he bought the bike at the local shop years ago and so after getting home I emailed the local shop and the guy who sold the bike is still there and knew a bunch about it. The first thing he asked was if it was the one that ran motorcycle innertubes and used a shrimp net casing? I thought that was weird but the guy I bought the bike from said that innertubes were in fact the tire originally on the bike.

The shop owner dude said that the builder of the bike was still around and quite the character so he gave me his number and I was able to contact him. Turns out to be a 77 yr old guy that just can't and never has been able to stop tinkering. He made 3 sand bikes and this is the first one. He even sent me an actual photo's through the mail of it among others and I have scanned them finally to share.

This is my bike in it's original state with the innertube/shrimp net set up.
GetAttachment-6.aspx.jpeg


As you might surmise the tube/net thing didn't work all that great and flats were had. So because he used 17" alloy motorcycle rims, with the crap drilled out of them btw, he took an old knobby, set it up in a jig that rotated it and carved off the knobs down to the casing with an electric chainsaw. Then he dremeled the sidewalls to loosen up the sidewall for better flotation.
GetAttachment-5.aspx.jpeg

These he used on version II as seen here:
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And I am guessing that those tires took on a good bit of sand so his final effort ended up looking like this.
GetAttachment-2.aspx.jpeg

The guy apparently has a pretty extensive collection of British motorcycles including one just like Steve McQueen rode in The Great Escape that he is most proud of. To that end he has built a few motor things that defy description like this.
GetAttachment-1.aspx.jpeg

He said his latest one of these has a Triumph Bonneville TR6 motor.

For sure I have to get back down there someday soon and check in with this guy. He said come on by but be prepared to drool. I said I'd bring a bib.

My plans for the bike are to restore it to its original condition when time and money allows. I will go for the shaved tires because I want to take an electric chainsaw to a set of tires, who wouldn't?

Oh and might as well post the bike that started this all. 1965 Velo Solex made by Motobecane.
DSC02691.JPG
 

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Cool, thanks.

Love the fishnet stocking look, very sexy. I wonder if he tried coating the shrimp net/inner tube combo with liquid rubber or Aquaseal to resist flats better. And the complete lack of chainstays on the ATV-wheeled bike: eekster: Very cool efforts, though. Thanks for posting that up. Any idea what years(s) those were built? They are certainly remarkable in the fat tired history books. Great garage tech machines.:thumbsup:
 

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Thanks Mabman, awesome early FAT info. Here's a video of the final version. I think it may now reside at Moe's bike shop in Coos Bay. Notice the jackshaft was made from a Nexus hub - the guy was thinkin'!! This video's been around for a while, nice to get the story behind it. BTW, got a fatbike? Rode mine at the OR dunes last summer. Trying to get back down there a couple times this year. Love to get a few sand lovers together!


Cheers, Ward
 

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This is from a thread I started called "Mystery Fatbike" a while back. Alanm came through with the pick. I (and a few others had come across it on the web somewhere a few years ago and then lost track of it... thanks Alanm). Looks like double skinny rims run parralel with a " hammock" (for lack of a better word) stretched between them making up the middle part of the "rim"; and possibly auto innertubes for tires?? W/ maybe short paddles glued on. Jackshaft looks like a cut down crank. Where it came from and who made it is still a mystery. Anyone got any info? Anyhow, I thought it belonged here on the history sticky.

http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?p=6260328#poststop
 

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Wildfire said:
Love the fishnet stocking look, very sexy. I wonder if he tried coating the shrimp net/inner tube combo with liquid rubber or Aquaseal to resist flats better. And the complete lack of chainstays on the ATV-wheeled bike: eekster: Very cool efforts, though. Thanks for posting that up. Any idea what years(s) those were built? They are certainly remarkable in the fat tired history books. Great garage tech machines.:thumbsup:
Sorry about the delay in getting back to this thread. The blue bike was built in the winter of 96/97. The other two followed with the cut tired yellow one in between the jackshaft bike that he built around 02'. I guess he was pretty blown away by how cheap a Tommysea was at the local shop and said he could never compete with that! As far as I am concerned he has nothing to prove and is one inventive son of a gun.

I am really bummed I am not going to be able to get down there before I head out for SE AK here next week for four months to work on the boat in the picture packing salmon.
DSC02812.JPG


Hope he is still around in the fall. He is 77 now and had a stroke last year but still sounds full of p and v. My type of guy for sure.
 

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Can't post any pictures as I no longer have the mag, but a long time ago (197x or 198x?) the French bike mag Le Cycle had an article about a bike ridden in the Sahara desert. IIRC it used Citroen 2CV rims and tires laced to bicycle hubs. I think it had a kind of truss fork like the "guy with a beret" pics above, and can't remember the frame details. But, pretty sure this was before MTBs, so we're talking custom everything...
 

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kingsting said:
I think this may be the same bike. I'm not sure if the picture is from a newspaper article or a New Departure coaster brake ad.

Almost looks like regular bike rims inside modified car rims. The car rims may have been spoke type to begin with..... ;)

poikaa
 

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Back in 1931 they thought the bike of the future would have fat tyres (the future being 1951)



BTW in the previous post, that's a nice looking path racer in the shop window. Looks like fat tubulars on it.
 

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Thanks

Thanks for the info. As a newbie to the whole fat-bike culture I appreciate the knowledge.
 

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Fat bike history

Not sure if it was mentioned above, but the early incarnations that I knew of were custom built bikes by Roger Cowels and Steve Baker. They welded two and three hoops together side by side and then built a frame to fit. An internal geared hub, custom (Phil Wood) bottom bracket...
Roger stated that the three wheeler was superior.
For what it's worth.
Bjørn
 

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Please please read....thanks

Hello all,

I am carrying out initial market research for my Final Year Project for my BEng Mechanical Engineering Degree at the University of Hull. I would be incredibly appreciative of any response and questions you may have. I am very new to the idea of FatBikes so please if I am stating incorrect information please correct me. My supervisor at the University of Hull has given me the following task:

A new generation of off-road bike, so called 'FatBikes' utilise large (100mm wide) tyres running at relatively low pressures (5-20psi) to handle soft terrain like snow, mud and sand. Conventional portable bicycle pumps are designed to deliver low volumes of air at high pressure (60-120psi). Fatbike tyres are relatively easy to puncture and cyclists are faced with an onerous task to repair and re-inflate them when 'on the trail' due to their relatively large volumes. Additionally cyclists like to 'tune' the running pressure to the terrain, and therefore some means of measuring the absolute pressure accurately is required. The scope of the project is to design and evaluate a low-weight, highly portable, manufacturable solution to this issue. There is no preferred conceptual solution, the project should include a widely ranging survey of air-pumping technologies.

Adding to this, im hoping to manufacture a prototype and then test it.

Firstly can anybody suggest any pumps on the current market and/or send me a link to the relevant websites?

Sounds obvious but do FatBike tyres have an inner tube and is the value on this inner tube the same as a conventional bike tyre?

Many, many Thanks

Dave
 

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Hello all,

I am carrying out initial market research for my Final Year Project for my BEng Mechanical Engineering Degree at the University of Hull. I would be incredibly appreciative of any response and questions you may have. I am very new to the idea of FatBikes so please if I am stating incorrect information please correct me. My supervisor at the University of Hull has given me the following task:

A new generation of off-road bike, so called 'FatBikes' utilise large (100mm wide) tyres running at relatively low pressures (5-20psi) to handle soft terrain like snow, mud and sand. Conventional portable bicycle pumps are designed to deliver low volumes of air at high pressure (60-120psi). Fatbike tyres are relatively easy to puncture and cyclists are faced with an onerous task to repair and re-inflate them when 'on the trail' due to their relatively large volumes. Additionally cyclists like to 'tune' the running pressure to the terrain, and therefore some means of measuring the absolute pressure accurately is required. The scope of the project is to design and evaluate a low-weight, highly portable, manufacturable solution to this issue. There is no preferred conceptual solution, the project should include a widely ranging survey of air-pumping technologies.

Adding to this, im hoping to manufacture a prototype and then test it.

Firstly can anybody suggest any pumps on the current market and/or send me a link to the relevant websites?

Sounds obvious but do FatBike tyres have an inner tube and is the value on this inner tube the same as a conventional bike tyre?

Many, many Thanks

Dave
Dave, You might get more responses if you posted this as it's own thread on the forum rather than buried in the history section.

That said: Most fatbikes do use tubes, both shraeder and presta valves are used.

I think you have been given a tough assignment because the initial premise is a bit overstated. In my experience fatbikes don't get an inordinate number of flats and quite a few existing pumps work pretty well to pump up the tires when needed especially when you are just adjusting pressure to match changing conditions. I use a Crank Brothers mini pump on the trail and have used a Zefal mini as well. If you could develop a mini pump that pumped the large volume tires faster than what is out there now, that would be a good thing but the bar is already fairly high. There are also pretty good digital pressure gauges out there already (search pressure guage or something like that to find threads on them). Good Luck
 
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Evingson

just a quick shot of the previously mentioned John Evingson built bike. I'm the third owner, since John built it, I believe. Superlight frame - this thing is around 26lbs. The custom racks are the cool too.

 
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