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Many youtube videos say that the front rebound should be set to stop the front wheel from just lifting off the ground when you're standing over the bike and compress the fork.

However no matter what I set my rebound to my front wheel never seems to leave the ground when i compress it (like shown at about 7:50 of this video). Even on fastest rebound the front wheel doesn't leave the ground like it does in this video.

I have a santz cruz bronson v3 with a yari fork and weigh about 200 pounds with all my equipment, and am running 90 psi in the fork. Not sure if I have something set up wrong.

(49) 10 Minute Suspension Setup | Get Your MTB Dialled FAST! - YouTube
 

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that's because it's NOT supposed to. if it does, it's under-dampened and over-sprung...
Not true. Most forks will allow you to reduce rebound damping enough to get the front wheel to leave the ground like that video. If it doesn't, then the LSR may be over damped or the LSR adjustment might be borked.
Now, it's not what should happen when the rider is applying weight to the bars, but when carpark testing to get a baseline rebound adjustment it can help.

Having said that - it doesn't find a good baseline for the fork + rider. Only a starting point for the fork. I find a better baseline setting for LSR on a fork (which takes into account different rider weights) is to:
  • Start with LSR completely closed;
  • Ride off a gutter (curb) standing up with your weight on the handlebars and arms locked;
  • See how fast the fork bounces back up after the initial compression;
  • Initially it will probably be slow to get you back to your sag point, so speed up LSR;
  • Repeat
  • If it comes up and overshoots your sag point, then slow it down;

I aim for an initial setting that just overshoots the sag point and then settles. Write that down.
Once you have that initial setting you need to ride it on the trails and see how it feels. Go up or down a click or two from the initial setting and see how it behaves on a trail.
 

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MTBR Member since 2001...
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I'm with @.WestCoastHucker. When your front wheel leaves the ground, there is no steering and no traction. So in general, whatever you need to do to maintain contact is important without sacrificing the forks ability to recover from a "hit". The front wheel should not kick back and leave the ground.

Set your sag. Valves open, rebound settings 2-3 clicks below 50% (middle). Rear suspension approx 30%, F approx 25%. Following your video, add or remove air. if the fork doesn't have an O ring use a zip tie.

Once the sag is set correctly, ride the bike over hilly or bumpy terrain. Start increasing the rebound gradually testing after each adjustment. As you dial this in, you will eventually feel the fork go from mushy slow rebound to over sprung (bouncy) where it feels like the front tire is kicking back. Now reduce by a click or two. That should be about right.

Inexpensive forks are not infinitely adjustable and can be harder to tune for heavier riders. My fat a$$ is 210 currently.
 

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jcd's best friend
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Does your Yari have the Motion Control damper? Personally I hate that damper. I've always ripped them out and installed a Charger instead. It could help you get dialed in a bit better.
 

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since 4/10/2009
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from what i've seen/read, isnt it supposed to overshoot sag point, THEN settle with one oscillation?
his last statement answers that with additional detail. You don't want it to way overshoot sag (this is what's happening if/when the front wheel gets bucked off the ground in the example vid). You want it to just overshoot it and then settle easily. @smearin 's method is what I've always used for my initial rebound setup test before riding and fine tuning.
 
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