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don't try this at home
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say ed. that's a nice frame and name, but that fork looks a bit out of place, since you weren't asking me. look at DAS's, then look at yours. gotta find yourself i nice steel fork to go with that.

and that steerer tube. man that looks dangerous. needs cuttin'

and...

i'm just saying cuz, you know how we were talking the other day about bikes we see but don't say anything ;-) well, i feel i can say it.
 

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Mashers Only!!
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Eddy you Hollywood and Calvin are pissin me off!!!! I said no more new bikes for the rest of the year!!! So for the last few weeks I have been riding my road bike. Also for the last few weeks I have been eying the track bikes(fixies) from Specialized, Trek, and Felt!!! Looks like I'll have a new Felt by monday If I can locate a 58cm this weekend.. Man I hate you guys right now... :mad:
So new fixie with front brakes here I come!! :D :D :D

HUGH
:)
 

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DAS said:
Hugh,

Have you considered a Soma Rush? Sweet ride and tons of bang for the buck. I love the tubeset and the fork. It's so smooth! I'm doing a century on mine soon...
I just checked the web site. I'll make a call to the shop in Carlsbad today to see what they have in stock.. How do you guys like the track geometry on the road?

HUGH
:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Soma ride

HUGH said:
I just checked the web site. I'll make a call to the shop in Carlsbad today to see what they have in stock.. How do you guys like the track geometry on the road?

HUGH
:)
I'm not sure the Soma has a "track" geometery. It seems less track-ish than other fixed gear bikes I've looked at. I test rode the Bianchi Pista and the Surly and went with the Soma due to the tube set (Reynolds 631), nice paint job, the semi-lugged fork, and the nice long chain dropouts. I run a 44x16 and have a high, upright stem. The bike is very road friendly and great for climbing. The frame is slightly short for me which I think is best for downhill handling. I wouldn't want to be any more stretched out with the need to turn and stop the bike quickly on the road. Also, I recommend going with a steel fork for the full classic fixie ride and you gotta have a front brake no doubt about it. Overall the Soma seems like a good combination of nice looking new frame and beater/utility cheap steel. I wouldn't want anything fancier for this 'worker' bike and I wouldn't want anything uglier or older. I found it to be a good compromise and it meets all my needs.
 

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zeebot
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DAS said:
I'm not sure the Soma has a "track" geometery. It seems less track-ish than other fixed gear bikes I've looked at. I test rode the Bianchi Pista and the Surly and went with the Soma due to the tube set (Reynolds 631), nice paint job, the semi-lugged fork, and the nice long chain dropouts. I run a 44x16 and have a high, upright stem. The bike is very road friendly and great for climbing. The frame is slightly short for me which I think is best for downhill handling. I wouldn't want to be any more stretched out with the need to turn and stop the bike quickly on the road. Also, I recommend going with a steel fork for the full classic fixie ride and you gotta have a front brake no doubt about it. Overall the Soma seems like a good combination of nice looking new frame and beater/utility cheap steel. I wouldn't want anything fancier for this 'worker' bike and I wouldn't want anything uglier or older. I found it to be a good compromise and it meets all my needs.
why do you gotta have a front brake? I ride mine with none and have no issues and i live in Manhattan. Track skids are fairly easy if you spend a day practicing them in a big parking lot. Although maybe it's easier on my 'old and ugly' 1985 schwinn traveler.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Spookykinkajou said:
why do you gotta have a front brake? I ride mine with none and have no issues and i live in Manhattan. Track skids are fairly easy if you spend a day practicing them in a big parking lot. Although maybe it's easier on my 'old and ugly' 1985 schwinn traveler.
Well, I use my front brake a lot. I ride where it is very hilly, though. Maybe its safe to go without a brake in Manhattan since it's flat? Dunno. I've become very dependent on my front brake and don't mind using it on really fast descents. I think of the front brake as essential for super hilly, fast riding with the danger of cars cutting into the road.
 

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Medium?
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3 reasons

Brake pads are cheaper and last longer than tires.

I could get away with no brake either. I often go a whole day without touching it. But there's always that idiot who makes a left-on-red right in your path, and there's no way you can get the slowing-power out of a track skid that you can out of a front brake. It's like an e-brake.

Finally, sometimes I'm just faqing tired. Friday, on the way home from the train after a couple brewschkies, I'm not always into putting a bunch of effort into stopping at a red light. I s'pose I could just blow through 'em...
 

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Fast Eddy said:
The front would work ok, but it's heavy, and the bearings are a little rough. I've got a Phil Wood hub for it waiting for an open pro rim. The rear will be eno/open pro.
Did you steal your front wheel from this guy?

<img src = "https://www.velonews.com/images/news/6334.8180.f.jpg">

Taken from: https://www.velonews.com/tour2004/news/articles/6334.0.html
 
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