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Witty McWitterson
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kedge makes a conversion kit for Di2 as well. With Ultegra Di2 out, we're sure to have at least a more affordable version of e shifting. Not that I'm looking for tomfoolery like that.
 

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Plays with tools
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+1. it's like looking at some super exotic ultra limited sports car that is unobtainable, ridiculously expensive (and often times not that pretty). If you throw near unlimited resources at something there is something lost in the end product IMO.
And on the other hand you have the Glikhouse P 4/5ths that Pinnafarini built off one of the last Enzo chasis to come out of Maranello. Car is a full custom one off built off a chasis of one of the most covetaed super cars in history. I don't think the collective MTBR bike stable cost as much as that car would bring at action.
 

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remind me again of the point of a "lefty" rigid fork... :skep:
I think the only point here is light.

I remember way back in the day, MBA would run an article on light bikes and the one that always was the lightest was a Klein Aluminum bike with drilled out Sachs/Huret road derailleurs, tiny cassette, useless tires and minimal everything.

It was the lightest thing going back then and totally unusable except to a lightweight roadie riding on dirt paths and rail trails.

This looks like the same thing, i mean Kudos to them for making a light bike and all but this is as relevant to 99.9% of MTBR riders as the aforementioned one-off supercar.
 

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transmitter~receiver
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I think the only point here is light.

I remember way back in the day, MBA would run an article on light bikes and the one that always was the lightest was a Klein Aluminum bike with drilled out Sachs/Huret road derailleurs, tiny cassette, useless tires and minimal everything.

It was the lightest thing going back then and totally unusable except to a lightweight roadie riding on dirt paths and rail trails.

This looks like the same thing, i mean Kudos to them for making a light bike and all but this is as relevant to 99.9% of MTBR riders as the aforementioned one-off supercar.
I agree about light being the point, but I seriously doubt if that fork is any lighter than a Niner... and bone-rattling stiffness, which you would need to keep it from bump steering, isn't what most people are looking for in a carbon rigid fork.
From an engineering standpoint, none of the things that made Lefty feasible exist or are a good idea in the rigid platform.
I think it is a novelty... a gimmick, but that's just my opinion.
If someone can show me that it's significantly lighter than 600g (and I mean all of it, including the steerer and axle, which many people don't consider when comparing Leftys), I might buy it for lightness alone.
*edit - by "buy it" I mean believe that it furthered the goal of a light bike.
 

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I agree about light being the point, but I seriously doubt if that fork is any lighter than a Niner... and bone-rattling stiffness, which you would need to keep it from bump steering, isn't what most people are looking for in a carbon rigid fork.
From an engineering standpoint, none of the things that made Lefty feasible exist or are a good idea in the rigid platform.
I think it is a novelty... a gimmick, but that's just my opinion.
If someone can show me that it's significantly lighter than 600g (and I mean all of it, including the steerer and axle, which many people don't consider when comparing Leftys), I might buy it for lightness alone.
*edit - by "buy it" I mean believe that it furthered the goal of a light bike.
According to Black Cat Bone's site the fork is only "Under 700g" which I'm assuming includes the hardware. The only thing I think it achieves besides uniqueness is wheel interchangeability with a normal Lefty
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I wonder which component on that bike is not usable on a daily basis. It has a Sram casette, Shimano derailleurs, aluminum chainrings, aluminum cranks...

To me, the only thing that requires more care than usual is the carbon rims, but nowadays there are a lot of private XC racers, at least where Iive, and this is far from being a flat place, that use that kind of rims in all but the most extreme races,

About the fork, it allows to vary head and seat angles, rake, therefore trai, frot end height,... and the same fork works for 26", 650b and 29". It seems that particular unit weighted in at 650g including axle and hardware. About bump steering users haven't noticed nothing different from any other fork. Same about fore-aft compliance, thus bump absorbtion. That's the cool thing about CF anisotropy.

It it was about building the lightest bike, there are lots of parts where to gain in that bike. Obviously it is not an AM rig, but as a XC bike all I would do is have a spare training wheelset.
 

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I wonder which component on that bike is not usable on a daily basis. It has a Sram casette, Shimano derailleurs, aluminum chainrings, aluminum cranks...

To me, the only thing that requires more care than usual is the carbon rims, but nowadays there are a lot of private XC racers, at least where Iive, and this is far from being a flat place, that use that kind of rims in all but the most extreme races,

About the fork, it allows to vary head and seat angles, rake, therefore trai, frot end height,... and the same fork works for 26", 650b and 29". It seems that particular unit weighted in at 650g including axle and hardware. About bump steering users haven't noticed nothing different from any other fork. Same about fore-aft compliance, thus bump absorbtion. That's the cool thing about CF anisotropy.

It it was about building the lightest bike, there are lots of parts where to gain in that bike. Obviously it is not an AM rig, but as a XC bike all I would do is have a spare training wheelset.
How about Tubular tires, 99gr prototype tune hub, carbon fiber saddle and ti spokes which i can't understand how they get enough tension in those for the wheels to not be super flexy and yet prevent the Tune hubs from shearing at the spoke holes.

I mean sure race day lay it on the line it would be a wonder bike but I would be much more interested in this bike with the sequential shifting and a day to day usable mountain bike for the average mountain biker, not the flyweight, euro pro crowd.
 
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The points about the Lefty are true of course, but I don't see why anyone cares for the sequential shifting either. It's about the last "problem" that needs to be solved. I consider the independent shifters an asset, not a burden, especially with a FS bike.
 

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How about Tubular tires, 99gr prototype tune hub, carbon fiber saddle and ti spokes which i can't understand how they get enough tension in those for the wheels to not be super flexy and yet prevent the Tune hubs from shearing at the spoke holes.

I mean sure race day lay it on the line it would be a wonder bike but I would be much more interested in this bike with the sequential shifting and a day to day usable mountain bike for the average mountain biker, not the flyweight, euro pro crowd.
The tubular tires are not race day only use, the only downside to them is that if you get a flat that sealant will not fix you are screwed. The 99g Tune hub is a road hub that they took pictures of so the magnetic drive mechanism could be shown. The rear hub on the bike is around 185-190g which is not that much lighter then AC hubs or the new DT 180 disc hubs. The wheels are 32 spokes so using titanium spokes was not a problem, especially with the stiffness of the Enve rims.

Besides the seat we built the bike with parts that can be ridden everyday without worry. The fork was used because we wanted to make the bike rigid but also unique and that is what we came up with. We could have used a bunch of exotic race day only parts and made the bike 12.5lbs. The derailleurs are stock Shimano with the only modifaction being a smaller upper pully so that it can shift onto the largest cog in the back. The cassette is stock XX, we could have used one of our 150g titanium cassettes. The bars, stem and rims are all stock Enve parts. When we had the frame made we just said that we wanted a 29er frame made, we did not ask for the absolute lightest carbon layup possible.

The shifting is intriguing. Wonder if Fairwheel plans to sell this modified system or if this is a true one off.
Originally yes but not anymore. Shimano will not allow anyone to sell a system that modifies how the di2 system shifts. You can make retrofit kits to adapt the system to mtb use but you cannot change the way the system shifts.

Rider weight limit: 95 lbs.
What parts on the bike have a 95lb weight limit? Is is the Enve stem, handlebar or rims? The cassette is SRAM XX, so I guess that has a 95lb weight limit?
 
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