[youtube width="610" height="343" align="left"]httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GHj66D2ZpUw&hd=1

The Six Pack is a stubby, monster flashlight. It packs 6 Cree XPGs in one light head with a self-contained battery. It is an ultimate flashlight. It's got a big beam pattern with no hot spot and it can run 3 hours in high mode.

It shares the same charger as the tiny Exposure Joystick so charge time grows to a very lengthy 24 hours with a fully discharged battery

Craftsmanship is typical British so expect only the best machining, CNCing and laser etching. We like the ergonomics of this light except the off switch which requires a long 3 seconds of pressing the small button. If you get it wrong, you'll fall in the dreaded flash mode.

New for 2012 is a gold-plated smart port and a rubber smart port cover. The smart port is typically used for charging but it has other nifty tricks like:
  • Accepting a remote switch
  • Integrating with a tail light
  • Charging another light by leveling the battery levels
  • Accepting a remote battery
  • Charging a smart phone

Specifications:
  • Price: $600.00
  • Claimed Lumens: 1925 Lumens
  • Light Head Weight: 498 grams
  • Installed Weight: 498 grams
  • Run Time: 3 Hours
  • Measured MTBR Lux: 135 Lux
  • Measured Lumens: 1240 Lumens
Mounting:

Handlebar mounting is done with a handlebar clamp that is bolted on. It has a spring loaded pin that locks a cleat on the light unit. It's nifty but not ideal if you take the clamp off and on the bike to move it to another. It requires a tool and a rubber sleeve to lock the clamp in place. Left to right aiming is possible but it requires positioning and locking on the cleat with an allen tool as well. This system is really better suited if the clamp just stays on the bike.

For the Six Pack, the clamp looks too small for the task. It may be fine for the other smaller Exposure lights but Six Pack is significantly heavier and is a bigger load on very rough trails or in a crash.

Related Links

Mtbr Lights Shootout Main Page »
2012 Bike Lights Shootout »
Backyard Beam Pattern Comparisons »
Trail Beam Pattern Comparisons »
Light Meter Measurements »
Mtbr Lights Reviews »
Mtbr Lights Forum »

Light Meter Measurements:

The lux measurement of 135 MTBR Lux is good. Last year, it was head and shoulders above the competition but this year, everyone has caught up and delivering this much light or more at a lower price. In a laboratory environment with an integrating sphere, we measured the actual lumen output of this light to be 1240 lumens. This is about 35% lower than the claimed 1925 lumens.

Strengths:
  • Extremely bright
  • Self contained
  • 3 hour run time
  • Great beam pattern without a hot spot
  • Very smart Smart Port can charge a phone, charge a light, power a tail light.
Weaknesses:
  • 24 hour charge time. This charger is just not appropriate for a battery this big.
  • Light head is too big and gets in the way
  • Mounting unit is too small for this light
  • Many other lights have caught up in brightness
Bottom Line:

This is a fun, styling exercise. It answers the question 'What if we put all these LEDs and batteries into a single self-contained unit?' The result is oohs and aahs.

Form factor is not that great and we'd much rather have two Toros on the handlebar. Or a Toro and Diablo. But if you want a single ultimate self-contained light, this is one of the brighter ones.

Beam Pattern Photos:



Backyard Beam Pattern Comparison Page »



Trail Beam Pattern Comparison Page »

Value Rating:

4 out of 5 Stars

Overall Rating:

3.75 out of 5 Stars

Related Links
Mtbr Lights Shootout Main Page »
2012 Bike Lights Shootout »
Backyard Beam Pattern Comparisons »
Trail Beam Pattern Comparisons »
Light Meter Measurements »
Mtbr Lights Reviews »
Mtbr Lights Forum »