Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
448 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can any of you relate to this? I sure can, not sure if its a bad thing though - i think it would be far worse to be addicted to the couch and the tv.


Exercise Abuse

While exercise can have helpful effects related to mood, anxiety, and overall physical fitness level, it can also lead to problems for some individuals. When performed in excess, exercise can lead to health, relationship, or even financial problems for the individual. The concept of exercise abuse is discussed commonly in the fitness world, and is often misunderstood by the population at large. It should be noted that people can enjoy regular exercise and NOT be abusing exercise. Exercise abuse is a difficult concept for which to provide a concise definition. It has previously been known by other names such as “exercise addiction”, “exercise dependency syndrome”, and “activity anorexia”. It was first identified in runners who were experiencing a variety of physical and psychological difficulties that related to their running program, but can occur in other types of exercise. It is perhaps best defined through its symptoms, which include the following.

1. Excessive reliance on exercise, usually daily, as the primary means of coping. For the exercise abuser, exercise may be the only means of coping with stress. It often leads to a state in which the person is continually increasing the amount of exercise s/he performs, as a sort of “tolerance” to exercise builds. This may result in the individual beginning to make other daily activities and responsibilities secondary to exercise (i.e. work, family, and/or social obligations become secondary in importance).

2. Exercising even while injured. Since the exercise abuser exercises often and at a high intensity level, s/he is at high risk for injury. Despite being injured, such individuals often refuse to stop exercising even long enough to let injuries heal (even serious injuries such as broken bones). The potential reasons for this include exercise being the only means of coping, a fear of not staying “in shape” or gaining weight, or a fear of loss of identity as someone who is “into exercise”. Exercising while injured can result in injuries being made more serious.

3. Experience of withdrawal symptoms. First, it should be noted that it often takes an external event to get an exercise abuser to stop exercising (e.g. an injury that absolutely prevents exercise). When such an individual does stop, commonly reported symptoms are similar to those in substance abuse. These include altered sleep patterns, difficulty concentrating, mood swings, physical symptoms (muscle stiffness and soreness), and distorted self-image (i.e. thinking one looks “fat” or “small”). Symptoms such as these can have a rapid onset (i.e. within a few days).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
200 Posts
exercise 4 coping...

[Excessive reliance on exercise, usually daily, as the primary means of coping

Well mountain biking for a few hours a day sure beats taking zoloft and Xanax daily, at least for me...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,177 Posts
priorities

It seems like anytime someone's dedication to a hobby/activity/substance/etc "interferes" with their relationship or job it's labelled as an abuse. Some of the arguements you hear against such "abuses" usually include spending lots of $ on the "abuse", dedicating lots of time to the "abuse", and some type of bodily/mental harm from the "abuse".

Well, I've spent lots of money and time on many many activities and have suffered injury from them too. They interfere with my work and marriage by causing me to spend time (either mentally or physically) elsewhere. They've all helped me cope with stress and gave me intense pleasure. These so-called abuses include(d) skiing, skateboarding, snowboarding, biking, camping, music, drugs/alcohol, and love.

In the end I'm a productive member of society and am in a happy marriage (to someone who also "abuses" the things she likes, including her running shoes and gym membership), and I'm physically fit and sharp minded.

It seems like, in many cases, if a person is dedicated or passionate about something to an extent that others don't relate to it is labelled as an abuse. From that perspective, what isn't an abuse? People just have different priorities and as long as someone is not hurting anyone else and is aware of the risks of their activity/abuse they should be left alone to abuse whatever it is that they're into to the fullest.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,816 Posts
Some of that sounded like me when I first was getting in shape....

I use to be overweight (230lbs+) and one day decided to get in shape. Used workouts that I learned in bootcamp and started jogging. Lost the weight and everything. I do remember getting to the point that if I didn't workout EVERY day I was depressed about it. Thinking that if I didn't I was going to gain it all back. Now that I'm a computer jockey, I've got a few more pounds than I like compared to a couple yrs ago. Nothing you'd probably notice, but I can tell and yes it bugs the hell me. Now that my foot is better, I hope to get back to my old running almost everyday sort of schedule. Or some sort of workout, but I'm not as anal as I use to be about it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
799 Posts
I commute everyday (and I push myself hard no other way I can do it) and ride as much as I can. Yes I was out of the scene for 6 months last year and I REALLY felt like a sack o' you-know-what, not at the depression end of the spectrum but pretty bad, lack of concentration lack of hunger for ...doing things.And YES I was excercising after 6 months when doctors said 9 months to a year taking it easy. Since I've been back on the bike(and other sports) I'm a complete person again. Now if someone is gonna go and tell me its BAD and I should stop riding or whatever they can stick their theory right up **** creek. That is MY opinion if you don't like it - I don't like you and no one cares ;)
 

·
life is a barrel o'fun
Joined
·
2,502 Posts
This has been a difficult year for me, to say the least! I've decided that mtb is my escape, and if it's an addiction, so be it.

'cause if it weren't for the biking, I'd be sitting on the curb drinking wine out of a paper bag instead of drowning my sorrows in trail building, advocacy, and endorphins.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
545 Posts
Bet it was a fat boy who invented the term "exercise abuse" :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
308 Posts
datako said:
Bet it was a fat boy who invented the term "exercise abuse" :)
I wonder if it was a gym or health club owner who is miffed that his profits go rolling by on a bike laughing and having fun rather than getting an incandascent tan while soulessly sweating it out in his gym.

Not all gyms are like that, but I have seen 'em. Really, really depressing places.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
545 Posts
Talking about gyms...

Th' Mule said:
...wonder if it was a gym or health club owner who is miffed that his profits go rolling by on a bike...
On my morning ride I pass a gym where there are a dozen roadies busy doing spin classes. There they are, all lycra & fluoro, sweating their little hearts out in the breeze from an industrial fan, pumping away to muzak, breathing the sweaty air, and paying for the privilege.

I reckon it's really dangerous. I can't see for about 100 yards because of the tears of laughter pouring out my eyes. Should I ask them to stop because they are puting me at risk?
:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
224 Posts
datako said:
Bet it was a fat boy who invented the term "exercise abuse" :)
Nope. Doctors made it up.
Typically, doctors only see one class of patients for whom exercise abuse is really an issue - patients with anorexia nervosa. The withdrawl is similar to drug withdrawl, and if they try to put these folks on bedrest to help them regain weight, they will perform covert exercise - clenching, figeting, etc.
Exercise to them is what booze are to the drunk, or horse is to the heroin addict.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
308 Posts
datako said:
On my morning ride I pass a gym where there are a dozen roadies busy doing spin classes. There they are, all lycra & fluoro, sweating their little hearts out in the breeze from an industrial fan, pumping away to muzak, breathing the sweaty air, and paying for the privilege.

I reckon it's really dangerous. I can't see for about 100 yards because of the tears of laughter pouring out my eyes. Should I ask them to stop because they are puting me at risk?
:D
No, no... Next time ride by eating an ice cream cone...

;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,771 Posts
Is that the Frank Luntz version?

PointBoy said:
Can any of you relate to this? I sure can, not sure if its a bad thing though - i think it would be far worse to be addicted to the couch and the tv.

Exercise Abuse

While exercise can have helpful effects related to mood, anxiety, and overall physical fitness level, it can also lead to problems for some individuals. When performed in excess, exercise can lead to health, relationship, or even financial problems for the individual. The concept of exercise abuse is discussed commonly in the fitness world, and is often misunderstood by the population at large. It should be noted that people can enjoy regular exercise and NOT be abusing exercise. Exercise abuse is a difficult concept for which to provide a concise definition. It has previously been known by other names such as "exercise addiction", "exercise dependency syndrome", and "activity anorexia". It was first identified in runners who were experiencing a variety of physical and psychological difficulties that related to their running program, but can occur in other types of exercise. It is perhaps best defined through its symptoms, which include the following.

1. Excessive reliance on exercise, usually daily, as the primary means of coping. For the exercise abuser, exercise may be the only means of coping with stress. It often leads to a state in which the person is continually increasing the amount of exercise s/he performs, as a sort of "tolerance" to exercise builds. This may result in the individual beginning to make other daily activities and responsibilities secondary to exercise (i.e. work, family, and/or social obligations become secondary in importance).

2. Exercising even while injured. Since the exercise abuser exercises often and at a high intensity level, s/he is at high risk for injury. Despite being injured, such individuals often refuse to stop exercising even long enough to let injuries heal (even serious injuries such as broken bones). The potential reasons for this include exercise being the only means of coping, a fear of not staying "in shape" or gaining weight, or a fear of loss of identity as someone who is "into exercise". Exercising while injured can result in injuries being made more serious.

3. Experience of withdrawal symptoms. First, it should be noted that it often takes an external event to get an exercise abuser to stop exercising (e.g. an injury that absolutely prevents exercise). When such an individual does stop, commonly reported symptoms are similar to those in substance abuse. These include altered sleep patterns, difficulty concentrating, mood swings, physical symptoms (muscle stiffness and soreness), and distorted self-image (i.e. thinking one looks "fat" or "small"). Symptoms such as these can have a rapid onset (i.e. within a few days).
Next thing theyll equate exercise to being un-american....cough..cough
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top