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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
No matter which Pivot you got, why did u get it after owning/riding the Ibis Mojo??? I have a Mojo SL and considering a Pivot because of similar suspension and cause it's aluminum, not carbon. I smashed the rear triangle at Bootleg Canyon and it made me think twice about carbon. Anyway, why Pivot after the Mojo???
 

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Why would anyone buy a mojo?


Silly bikes. Kinda feel like plastic toys.
 

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TIMBERRR said:
Why would anyone buy a mojo?


Silly bikes. Kinda feel like plastic toys.
well, i suppose that technically they are plastic toys... (unless you get paid to ride:thumbsup: ))...

i still prefer metal toys... everytime i hear a rock come up and smack the underside of my bike i'm reminded why i like metal...
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
true. I used to cringe every time a rock hit the bottom bracket area. but after several months and the carbon taking the hits with no problem I stopped caring. The carbon held up surprisingly well. I still believe that when the bike is kept on the rubber-side-down the bike handles surprisingly well. Jumps, G-outs, techical up and down and fast cornering single track. My problem was when I went over the bars (in a VERY high exposure area) and I landed the bike on the rear triangle, small chunks of carbon came off and it got me a bit scared. The bike rode fine afterwords, but none the less, I replaced the rear triangle cause it looked like hell. It makes me want aluminum not because of the way it feels while riding, but because it does better against rocks.

But anyone else have any better reasons then that?
 

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TIMBERRR said:
Why would anyone buy a mojo?


Silly bikes. Kinda feel like plastic toys.
Why would anyone buy a Pivot?

If I hook a boat anchor to the back of my Mojo SL and pump up the pressure in the rear shock really high then it would feel just like a Pivot . . .

Equally stupid post as the one quoted above.

Both are great brands!!
 

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volcanized said:
true. I used to cringe every time a rock hit the bottom bracket area. but after several months and the carbon taking the hits with no problem I stopped caring. The carbon held up surprisingly well. I still believe that when the bike is kept on the rubber-side-down the bike handles surprisingly well. Jumps, G-outs, techical up and down and fast cornering single track. My problem was when I went over the bars (in a VERY high exposure area) and I landed the bike on the rear triangle, small chunks of carbon came off and it got me a bit scared. The bike rode fine afterwords, but none the less, I replaced the rear triangle cause it looked like hell. It makes me want aluminum not because of the way it feels while riding, but because it does better against rocks.

But anyone else have any better reasons then that?
actually, it's good to know that it can take hits in the bb area... i always figured the frames had been designed (or coated) to do so... but, i always think about how fancy high modulous fly rods can be fatally damaged simply by getting smacked with the hook...:eek: i always worry about the damage i can't see...

on the other hand, i love graphite handle bars, so... i'm inconsistant...:rolleyes:
 

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Let's now talk about lateral stiffness.
Hands down the winner is PIVOT. (Lopes link or not)
As far as suspension stiffness the larger air can on the 09 M5 has made all the difference in the world. Just don't forget the 30 percent sag.
PLUSH
 

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TIMBERRR said:
Let's now talk about lateral stiffness.
Hands down the winner is PIVOT. (Lopes link or not)
As far as suspension stiffness the larger air can on the 09 M5 has made all the difference in the world. Just don't forget the 30 percent sag.
PLUSH

I tested both the large and small and air can Mach 5 and found it be much less plush than the Mojo, DW 5-Spot, and the Ellsworth Epiphany. The large air can made some difference, but not nearly enough (i.e. not "all the difference in the world").

You can see the LONG review here:

http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=502531

We tried different amounts of sag, etc and just never got either one (small or large air can version) to feel plush.

If I were to sell my Mojo, I'd buy the new Turner DW 5-spot, hands down.
 

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meph said:
I tested both the large and small and air can Mach 5 and found it be much less plush than the Mojo, DW 5-Spot, and the Ellsworth Epiphany. The large air can made some difference, but not nearly enough (i.e. not "all the difference in the world").

You can see the LONG review here:

http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=502531

We tried different amounts of sag, etc and just never got either one (small or large air can version) to feel plush.

If I were to sell my Mojo, I'd buy the new Turner DW 5-spot, hands down.

Meph, you seem to be selling your review pretty hard!!

I think the original poster was asking about the longevity issues associated with carbon vs alloy-

I've spoken to a few people who, like myself have owned Mojos, and all were concerned about the longevity issues associate with the rear triangle, specifically the chain stays. A couple of guys I know had their rear triangle changed because of micro fractures resulting from normal riding, i.e. not the result of impact.

Yeti seem to have it right with their carbon chainstay on the ASR- where they bond on an alloy protector that wraps around the stay. Maybe this approach could be considered by Ibis?
 

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bobsouth said:
Meph, you seem to be selling your review pretty hard!!

I think the original poster was asking about the longevity issues associated with carbon vs alloy-

I've spoken to a few people who, like myself have owned Mojos, and all were concerned about the longevity issues associate with the rear triangle, specifically the chain stays. A couple of guys I know had their rear triangle changed because of micro fractures resulting from normal riding, i.e. not the result of impact.

Yeti seem to have it right with their carbon chainstay on the ASR- where they bond on an alloy protector that wraps around the stay. Maybe this approach could be considered by Ibis?
My only point was that were I to get rid of the Mojo then I would buy a Turner DW-link, not a Pivot (and why I would do that).
 

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Well I guess the Pivot hater count is 1. I knew we would find one if we looked long and hard. Found one, not sure where he is from or what types of trails he rides, but lets get back to the question here. **Anyone coming off a Mojo, going to a Pivot.**

Thank you meph, you had a Mojo but went to a Els, thanks for your input.
Your review is now +100 on views because of this but Volcs question is still unanswered.
 

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Carbon Composite is not 'plastic'. Thermoset, not thermoplastic. Maybe the old GT's that had a nylon matrix but nothing made today.
 

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mcstumpy said:
Well I guess the Pivot hater count is 1. I knew we would find one if we looked long and hard. Found one, not sure where he is from or what types of trails he rides, but lets get back to the question here. **Anyone coming off a Mojo, going to a Pivot.**

Thank you meph, you had a Mojo but went to a Els, thanks for your input.
Your review is now +100 on views because of this but Volcs question is still unanswered.
I know one guy that did, to a 429. Liked both bikes fine, but *****ed incessantly that his 29" wheels were too heavy. I think he's over that now.
 

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meph said:
If I hook a boat anchor to the back of my Mojo SL and pump up the pressure in the rear shock really high then it would feel just like a Pivot with all the suspension bolts loose. . .
Fixed
 

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Having ridden the Mach 5, new 5.Spot, and Mojo, I feel that the 5.Spot is much closer to the Mojo in feel, suspension compliance, and handling than the Mach 5. The Mach 5 is firmer in mid travel using the same air shock, and the BB is much higher, and seat position more laid back. Both the Mach 5 and Mojo have smoother and more lively very small bump (gravel sized) compliance than the 5.Spot, but maybe after the bushing pivots break in over time the difference wouldn't be so noticeable. Rear suspension flex is nearly the same using the same rear wheel between the Mojo and 5.Spot, minor wheel build differences are a greater difference, but the Mach 5 is much less flexy (I've tested all 3 with my rear wheel). The 5.Spot is the heaviest, most "stout" and stable feeling while riding.

For Bootleg and other places with similar very rocky conditions like South Mountain near Phoenix, I'd prefer the Mach 5 over the other two for the better pedal clearance, and laid back seat angle, and scraping anodized aluminum is less easy than paint. Bootleg is so rugged that the firmer Mach 5 suspension compliance isn't really a difference factor. I firm up my Mojo suspension to near Mach 5 feel for that place or other very rugged places.

Just my opinion!
 

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Love it when such nice bikes are discussed. I'm very gun-shy of "Motobecane or Ibex"...thankfully, I must have become a bikesnob along the way.
Suspension- I like the Mojo and the Spot. I think the biggest reason I would have gone to the Mach5 would be the stiffness and the biggest reason I'd stay away would be the suspension feel...just not compliant enough.
 

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Maybe the answer is...

That very few riders have switched from the Mojo to a Pivot. I own a Mojo SL, and love it. The Mojo is a great design, that takes full advantage of the ability for the DW link to provide very compliant suspension performance, while remaining efficient. As to lateral stability I am sure that the (two or more pounds heavier for the frame) Pivots have an advantage, and large and/or abusive riders might feel better on a Pivot. I am 170 lbs, riding an XL Mojo SL built up to below 23 lbs with I-9 wheels and the Lopes link, and I have no problems with lateral stability with my Mojo. I think the concern re durability with carbon fiber frames is a little over stated; aluminum frames do not liked to be crashed into rocks either, and no one should trust an aluminum frame that has been dented-it will fail at the dent eventually. Either frame can break, how this is handled by the bike company is really what is important. I know Ibis is second to none in handling warranty claims, and crash replacements for those bikes not covered, and I trust that good folks at Pivot would offer a similar high level of service.
I am lurking here because I am considering going to a Pivot, only because they make the Mach 429, and there is no 29er option from Ibis. I would to see a light carbon fiber 29er DW frame though, anyone....
 

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Pivot's variation of the DW-Link is a bit of an enigma, and without some serious time mashing the pedals -- meaning, more than a quick demo -- you can't really begin to appreciate how it manifests itself real-world on the trail.

I've ridden my buddy's Mojo 15+ times which I *honestly* liked a lot, have a solid chunk of time in on my Firebird -- and never have saddled a Mach 5.

People who comment on the "harshness" of the stroke are by all means correct. It's the opposite of, say, a Demo 8, but that was by design, guys. It's not as if it is some nefarious byproduct of the suspension geometry that Cocalis and the crew was unable to engineer out. What it translates into is a bike that rides extremely (and surprisingly) well across the board, and, here is the kicker --

Even I notice the stiff rear end, but when I look down at the o-ring I've used every bit of the 167mm travel. And didn't even realize it. It just works transparently beneath you, yet feels like you are riding a much shorter-sprung machine. And these bikes are meant to go fast, at which point the suspension just opens up on you. Yet you maintain solid terrain feedback, and never get lost in sloppy suspension movement.

So what you get is a mind boggling mixture of full-cush and sharp trail riding characteristics that I don't think any other make has a thumb on at the moment. Of course, this comes down to preference. Some folks just like super-squishy bikes, and are willing to pay the price by having to use a platform.

Out of curiosity, I'm going to slap an RC4 on when I get back just to see how it rides, but even the pre-BV RP23 rides great. At the end of the day, for whatever reason, I found myself riding harder and faster on the Bird than I have on any similar bike I've owned in the past.

I'm sold on Pivot, but it's not as if you are hurting on your Mojo, either. Would I go through the trouble of selling one for a Pivot knowing what I know now? Probably. But it'd be a tough decision.
 

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Firebird? Mojo? Why not a 3-way...

I love my Mojo, built for XC at 24.76 lbs.

I love my Firebird, built for Galbraith/Whistler at 33.61 lbs.

And they love me. We got a nice thing going. Why should I have to choose? See lyrics...
 

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I have no idea what my Firebird weighs.... what I DO know is that only the skinniest weight weenie on a 19lb bike passes me up and on the way down... I've never even seen a weight weenie on those trails :) It's not that I'm burley but I like to try new stuff.
 
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