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The Martian
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1,200 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone; I'm new here (well, I've lurked before). I hope you don't mind me popping in and asking a question or two :)

First some background might help: I've been seriously mountain biking for about a year and a half now and am actually helping instruct a class here at college. I'm also currently working on certification in wilderness first aid. Because of these last two things especially I've decided it is who of me to put together a first aid kit in some sort of pack that I can carry with me (I want some fairly advanced stuff like a SAM splint, large suringe, pocket mask, along with the general gauze and ace bandage stuff, so it needs to be on the medium side of fanny pack I think). I'd just go buy a nice hip/lumbar pack except for one problem. I have a camelbak, and since I'm small (and it's a 3 liter pack...like the MULE if you are familiar) I really don't have much room on my back without somehow doubling the packs over. And that is my problem...

I want the first aid pack to be seperate from my camelbak (the camelbak is large enough to store all my bike repair stuff, some "just in case" type food (I'm hyperglycemic) and, if I unzip the extender, a windbreaker.) While I concievably could cram all of the medical stuff into the camelbak I just don't want to. 1) it's not set up for a medical pack (too deep, really no pockets, so things are hard to get to if they aren't large. Plus I'd have to store my greasey bike rag in the same pocket as my "sterile" medical equipment....problem obviously.) 2) I want to be able to take the medical pack independent of the camelbak in instances when I may not be on a bike, etc. (this is also why I want a pack that I can carry as opposed to a pack that I could mount on my bike).

So, has anyone delt with "layering" packs like this? Are there any hip packs that actually are made to sit with the bulk on your side instead of spread across your back? Or am I stuck going with the old fashioned front fanny pack (limited in size if I still want to be comfortable on my bike all day)? I really would like to keep the two packs seperate instead of just getting a camelbak that's larger and has more pockets if at all possible; have I lost my mind?

O, I'm not competing or doing anything really hardcore (and am used to carrying more weight than the water and medical pack will be), so weight is a non-issue here.
 

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Te mortuo heres tibi sim?
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8,848 Posts
As Shiggy said, look at the Wingnut stuff. They fit well, can hold a ton, and are very comfortable. The way they wrap around the waist, and the shoulder strap system is the key.

Caveat: I absolutely destroyed mine in six months. The side webbing was hashed, and the stitching holding several parts together pretty much disintegrated. All with the same sort of riding use I'd been putting prior bags through without any problems whatsoever. E-mailing my issues to the guy(s) at Wingnut did zippo; never got any sort of response. Repaired things on my own, but bagged it (heh!) in favor of more durable product. I'll not buy another Wingnut unless they address the issues I experienced. It's odd, because the H20 proof sail cloth they use for the pack body is quite tough, but the stitching and overall construction turned out to be veryshoddy on mine.

I've since replicated their strap system on a Camelbak H.A.W.G., and am about to do the same to a honkin' big Kona pack. Shop around, try as many packs on as you can.

ETA: apologies for the rant. Had to be done.
 

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The Martian
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1,200 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the website guys. I think the Hyper 2.5 pack would have to be sitting well below my waist, or up under the camelbak (my camelbak comes down essentially to my hip line when I'm standing which is the big problem). I've sent the company a message about a few of their bags, but has anyone delt with having bags either a) that low or b) up under (or over) another bag?

As for the SAM splint. It could be ditched if neccessary. I carry a CO2 "pump" though so telescoping air pumps wouldn't be serving me the double duty (although if that's what I were using it would be a great idea). I don't think the medium splint will take up that much room when rolled and if it does it could get thrown in the camelbak. Not ideal, but I'm at the point of improvising I think.
 

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Don't worry, be happy!
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8,141 Posts
Would it make sense to have different sets of gear? Certainly the local loop doesn't require the same level of preparedness as the all day wilderness epic. We are OEC trained ski patrollers, and that's how we do it.
 

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The Martian
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1,200 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yes, definitely in the long run it makes since to have different sets of gear. Right now my "set" of "gear" includes an ace bandage that isn't even full length, some bandaids, a granola bar, and of course the cell phone. I think this is inadequate even for the short stuff that I've been going on. Especially when I'm riding with the class and am at least indirectly responsible for their saftey (I am being paid to ride with them...).

I feel like to upgrade this to even short ride status I'm going to need a different pack unfortunately. Certaintly on short stuff I could (if neccessary) ditch the splint, probably the syringe, and some of the other gear and frankly I probably won't be carrying any more than my standard ace bandage, water, and cell phone if it's just me an a friend (in which case it will go in the camelbak). This is why I'm looking for something smallish that I can use in addition to my camelbak instead of just upgrading it to a larger one if possible.

Just exploring my options right now. I don't think it would be the end of the world if I ended up with a larger camelbak for the class; it's just not my ideal situation convienence wise or budget wise (I am a college student and in a perpetual state of brokeness so it's much easier for me to suppliment a smaller pack that can be added on to existing equipment rather than buying multiple sets of the same equipment if it's possible :) ).
 

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Formerly DMR For Life
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989 Posts
What about getting myabe something along the lines of this and straping it to your pack,

DMR

CougarTrek said:
Hi everyone; I'm new here (well, I've lurked before). I hope you don't mind me popping in and asking a question or two :)

First some background might help: I've been seriously mountain biking for about a year and a half now and am actually helping instruct a class here at college. I'm also currently working on certification in wilderness first aid. Because of these last two things especially I've decided it is who of me to put together a first aid kit in some sort of pack that I can carry with me (I want some fairly advanced stuff like a SAM splint, large suringe, pocket mask, along with the general gauze and ace bandage stuff, so it needs to be on the medium side of fanny pack I think). I'd just go buy a nice hip/lumbar pack except for one problem. I have a camelbak, and since I'm small (and it's a 3 liter pack...like the MULE if you are familiar) I really don't have much room on my back without somehow doubling the packs over. And that is my problem...

I want the first aid pack to be seperate from my camelbak (the camelbak is large enough to store all my bike repair stuff, some "just in case" type food (I'm hyperglycemic) and, if I unzip the extender, a windbreaker.) While I concievably could cram all of the medical stuff into the camelbak I just don't want to. 1) it's not set up for a medical pack (too deep, really no pockets, so things are hard to get to if they aren't large. Plus I'd have to store my greasey bike rag in the same pocket as my "sterile" medical equipment....problem obviously.) 2) I want to be able to take the medical pack independent of the camelbak in instances when I may not be on a bike, etc. (this is also why I want a pack that I can carry as opposed to a pack that I could mount on my bike).

So, has anyone delt with "layering" packs like this? Are there any hip packs that actually are made to sit with the bulk on your side instead of spread across your back? Or am I stuck going with the old fashioned front fanny pack (limited in size if I still want to be comfortable on my bike all day)? I really would like to keep the two packs seperate instead of just getting a camelbak that's larger and has more pockets if at all possible; have I lost my mind?

O, I'm not competing or doing anything really hardcore (and am used to carrying more weight than the water and medical pack will be), so weight is a non-issue here.
 

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The Martian
Joined
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1,200 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for the suggestion! I think I have decided on something similar and I'm glad to know I wasn't the only one thinking it (normally when that happens it doesn't work :) ). I'm looking at a bag that's slightly larger than the one you posted that I think I can just strap around the camelbak with good results. We shall see.
 

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Registered
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227 Posts
I carry a nice sized wound kit and a bunch of tape, my experience is that this is the most used stuff. splint if needed can be constucted with sticks and tape. most of that stuff you are never gonna need.or if you ride with a group, spread the stuff around.
 

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Dirt Eater
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301 Posts
Just get a bigger camelbak, like the Hawg. Keep all your first aid stuff in the big compartment in a thin bag, ready to wip out at a moments notice. With 916 CU inches of capacity, you could haul a LOT of gear in it. Its got enough compartments to keep the medical stuff seperate from the bike stuff.
This would likely be the easiest way.
 

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Sweep the leg!
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3,804 Posts
What on earth do you need a syringe for in your pack? Are you carrying injectables? Are you trained to utilize one even if you have it?

In all my years of combat medic training and hospital experience there's nothing more dangerous than someone with too little training having too many items in a pack.

I don't want to sound like an a-hole but do you really need to carry all that gear? I've done more and seen more done with next to nothing in the middle of nowhere than some fully equipped EMT's in cities.

If you've got the expertise and are willing to carry all that gear then I'm proud of you for taking care of the students. Otherwise, go easy on yourself and divide your gear into essentials and extras. Essentials ride with you. Extras stay back at the cars, where a phone for help should be as well.
 

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Formerly DMR For Life
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989 Posts
Caffeine Powered said:
What on earth do you need a syringe for in your pack? Are you carrying injectables? Are you trained to utilize one even if you have it?

In all my years of combat medic training and hospital experience there's nothing more dangerous than someone with too little training having too many items in a pack.

I don't want to sound like an a-hole but do you really need to carry all that gear? I've done more and seen more done with next to nothing in the middle of nowhere than some fully equipped EMT's in cities.

If you've got the expertise and are willing to carry all that gear then I'm proud of you for taking care of the students. Otherwise, go easy on yourself and divide your gear into essentials and extras. Essentials ride with you. Extras stay back at the cars, where a phone for help should be as well.
ditto

the only people that should have syringe in their medical kit are EMT trained and higher...if you (the OP) just just have first aid then I would leave the syringe at home

DMR

P.S. to the OP maybe look at getting something like this rather than putting a kit together your self
 

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Five is right out
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3,176 Posts
Caffeine Powered said:
What on earth do you need a syringe for in your pack? Are you carrying injectables? Are you trained to utilize one even if you have it?
WFA courses teach using a syrnge to irrigate wounds such as road rash. The same of course can be achieved by using bicycle water bottle or even a hydration bladder. WFA doesn't cover injecting drugs.
 

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govt kontrakt projkt mgr
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6,171 Posts
not really..

maybe he's a type 1 and not on the pump

DMR For Life said:
ditto

the only people that should have syringe in their medical kit are EMT trained and higher...if you (the OP) just just have first aid then I would leave the syringe at home

DMR

P.S. to the OP maybe look at getting something like this rather than putting a kit together your self
 

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The Martian
Joined
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1,200 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Breath guys...It's an irrigation syringe. I couldn't get a needle in the thing if I wanted to (and I don't want to). As womble said; you carry them for wound cleaning, and yes...if I wanted to I could use my camelbak for the same purpose.

I really don't feel like enough stuff to stop bleeding and wrap a wound is that much gear. Yea, the splint is something extra, but the thing rolls to about the size of an ace bandage, is light, and I'm willing to carry it.

Could I shove some bandaids down in the bottom of my camelbak and call it done, perhaps. That's not what I want though, and I would feel like **** if I got in a situation where I knew I could help someone but couldn't because I was too stupid/lazy to carry a few extra pounds (if that) in gauze and bandages, etc. I'm also anal about organization, hence why I want another pack...because my camelbak sucks for that. If that's not for you then fine; I'm not asking you to do anything different in your rides.

BTW: I would NEVER carry equipment I was not trained and certified to use, period. I'm not stupid.
 

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Because I am !
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1,307 Posts
You may not need all that stuff.

CougarTrek, first let me say, hats off to anyone who feels the need to carry
tools, first aid, or other items to assist a fellow outdoorsman who may be in
trouble.

I believe you can eliminate so many items in your first aid kit if you just sit
down and think about it with an open mind. Think Bike repair and First Aid
at the same time and you can eliminate many items from your pack.
No big list here of what you or I might carry, just the same thought that a
paramedic/wilderness rescue friend of mine gave me.

Do you carry Duck Tape? You should and you don't need a whole roll,
instead wrap it around something small like your tire pump or an old CO2
cartridge. Make sure it is a decent length. Seat posts work but it gets
dirty and wet so inside your pack is best.

Then think about how many ways you can use it. It can act as a boot for
your torn tire, or seal a serious cut (always use gauze under it), or work
as a tire patch in a pinch, or tape your derailleur out of the way if you break
your hanger :rolleyes:, or tape a stick to your leg or arm as a splint, or actually act
as a splint if taped over your clothing, can you say presure splint? Etc. etc.

Do this with most items you have in your pack or on your bike already and
don't double up and you will be surprised how well equipped you are or can
be for an emergency in the wilderness.

I believe some of the posts say nearly the same thing. Just carry what will
work to get the injured person to more qualified help. When on long epic
rides I even carry a GPS. What if you can't get the person out, can you
give GPS coordinates for a life flight helicopter?

Just a thought. Ride On !

ODN

 
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