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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm coming from an 08 Sworks Enduro and while I loved the plush ride I don't really need the travel for the areas that I ride. When I purchased my 08 Enduro I was actually looking go buy a FSR but could not resist the deal on the Enduro. I stopped riding dirt a back in 08/09 in favor of road due to having to drive my mtn bike to ride whereas with road I just pedal out of the garage. Two years later and I'm back in the market for a bike primarily for "exercise/Cardio" - XCross type terrain/fire roads. I realize that the Epic Expert is not a "Real" all mountain bike but I'm looking to get opinions from All Mountain riders who may have gone with a "Not quite so All Mountain" MB. I'm leaning towards the Epic Expert Carbon since I can't see spending over 9K on the Sworks Epic Disc.

Is it crazy to think that a Epic Expert Carbon could be a good trail bike with the focus being XC Terrain, with some trail riding sprinkled in? Any Enduro riders switch up with a Epic Expert?
 

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T.W.O
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The travel on this bike isn't your cookie cutter AM travel bike, but I don't see why you couldn't use it for trail riding????? Also the HTA angle isn't going to be the sweetest for when you point the bike down.

It seems like people really are taking these labels too seriously, now I wouldn't go to Whistler with that thing but it should be more than capable for anything you ride at your local trails.

That being said the Enduro was a much more capable AM bike.
 
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Switched from my 06 Enduro to a Fuel Ex8...thought about an Epic but decided to get something that could still handle some more technical stuff...though the Enduro is an awesome bike I never really meshed with it....I like the Geo of the Trek Better...for XC Stuff I still ride my HTs
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I really enjoyed my Enduro but always felt that I could get away with a bit lighter bike. The FSR Stump would be a good choice but for some reason I'm pulled towards the Epic - Actually the S model is pulling but finances will most likely dictate something under 6K.
 

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meow meow
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i think an epic carbon is more "racey" than you want. +2 on the stumpy if its gotta be spec, still light and quick but more suited to just riding.
 

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The epic is much more race oriented than a just riding around bike. You'll be much better served with a stumpy If you didn't like the enduro.
 

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why limit yourself to spec?

Given the budget you are talking about, why limit yourself to one manufacturer? There are other bikes to consider that may be more in the sweet spot you are looking for. Check out a Ibis Mojo SL (or hold out for the SL-R in June). You could probably build one of those at around 24 pounds (some go as low as 21) and it would have a bit slacker head tube for better descents. There are a ton of other bikes to try in this price range.
 

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All Mountain in a nut shell is a bike that can do everything, with no real bias towards any one aspect of the game. An Epic is biased towards xc. No reason a good rider can't rip on one, but it's not a middle of the rd type bike, it's build more for xc, and a rider would be limited in the type of terrain they can ride safely. When I think of AM, I think no limits governed by the bike
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T.W.O
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I'm still a little unsettled for a Carbon frame bike if your going to be hitting some nastier stuff with it.
 

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100% fuzz, 0% melody
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The bike does not know whether you call a trail "XC" or "All Mountain."

The bike does not care what kind of trail you take it on.

It's up to you to make the bike handle the terrain.

Despite what the MTBR Overlords suggest ("more than XC, less than FR/DH"), the phrase "All Mountain" is totally irrelevant to whether the bike can handle a particular kind of trail.
 

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Ash T. Abula said:
The bike does not know whether you call a trail "XC" or "All Mountain."

The bike does not care what kind of trail you take it on.

It's up to you to make the bike handle the terrain.

Despite what the MTBR Overlords suggest ("more than XC, less than FR/DH"), the phrase "All Mountain" is totally irrelevant to whether the bike can handle a particular kind of trail.
Sure it does. You're not going to ride Free Lunch hitting all the drops, Barrel Trail, hitting all the drops, Bootleg Canyon hitting all the gaps and steeps and expect an xc bike to not fail at some time. AM bikes let you ride all the mentioned trails no shuttling without worry of equipment failure. I've had a steer tube snap on me almost braking my neck. A fork doesn't care if you call it AM or XC right?
 

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100% fuzz, 0% melody
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slimat99 said:
Sure it does. You're not going to ride Free Lunch hitting all the drops, Barrel Trail, hitting all the drops, Bootleg Canyon hitting all the gaps and steeps and expect an xc bike to not fail at some time. AM bikes let you ride all the mentioned trails no shuttling without worry of equipment failure. I've had a steer tube snap on me almost braking my neck. A fork doesn't care if you call it AM or XC right?
You don't need a particular bike to hit anything. What you need is the skill to complete the move.

The bike's "All Mountain-ness" takes up the slack left hanging by the rider's lack of skill.

When I build trails, I build them as trails. Since they are "trails" does that mean I am required to ride a 5" travel bike on them? What if I ride a fully rigid bike on them?

What if I can ride a fully rigid bike on them, but when I take 5 of my local "freeride" hotshots on the trail, they say it is too steep and too technically difficult, despite their 7" travel "freeride" bikes?

Marketing lingo matters only for selling stuff to ignorant, naive buyers. When it comes to riding a bike, marketing lingo is totally irrelevant.

Thanks for displaying knowledge of Grand Junction trails though. That's cool of you.
 

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100% fuzz, 0% melody
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b-kul said:
yes. but its about choosing the right tool for the job.
Why are you the arbiter of what is the "right" tool?

Were you at the Cascade Creampuff several years back, yelling at Rudi Nadler and telling him to take his fixie cross bike off that trail network because it's not the right tool for the job?
 

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Ash T. Abula said:
You don't need a particular bike to hit anything. What you need is the skill to complete the move.

The bike's "All Mountain-ness" takes up the slack left hanging by the rider's lack of skill.

When I build trails, I build them as trails. Since they are "trails" does that mean I am required to ride a 5" travel bike on them? What if I ride a fully rigid bike on them?

What if I can ride a fully rigid bike on them, but when I take 5 of my local "freeride" hotshots on the trail, they say it is too steep and too technically difficult, despite their 7" travel "freeride" bikes?

Marketing lingo matters only for selling stuff to ignorant, naive buyers. When it comes to riding a bike, marketing lingo is totally irrelevant.

Thanks for displaying knowledge of Grand Junction trails though. That's cool of you.

I know where you are coming from and agree that it's rider skill first and foremost. Berrecloth did a tail whip on a tricycle! There are plenty of guys on xc bikes that can ring out guys on FR bikes. My point is you need equipment that is durable enough for your riding style. It's NOT SAFE to huck repeatedly any xc bike. Heavier parts is not marketing, it's necessity for safe use on advanced trails. If you are interested in riding GJ here's a short fun vid that shows the drops that are mixed in an xc area. A good rider can easily ride here on an xc bike, but you are risking equipment failure. http://vimeo.com/10587901
 
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