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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I see a lot of threads about entry level or low priced bikes, and wondered if we could list some entry level Clyde bikes. Regular entry level bikes fall short primarily with the fork, in my opinion. Clydes need 32mm stancions like the Tora or similar. I thought the 2008 Raleigh Mojave 8.0 could be listed. Anybody have any input?
 

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zarr said:
....Regular entry level bikes fall short primarily with the fork,..Anybody have any input?
The wheels/freehub don't have a chance, the cranks will creak and the brakes will warp. I bought my 210lbs 6"2" son a $400 Ironhorse 5.5. So far I've replaced the front fork (Tora 318), wheels (XT 756/Mavic 317/DT), cranks (FireX), brakes/levers (BB7/Speed7), shifters and deraillieurs (LX/XT). Now he can ride on a 20 mile single track without things breaking. IMHO, entry level and Clyde are not a good match. Oh, yea, the chain was a piece of junk too.
 

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pursuiter said:
The wheels/freehub don't have a chance, the cranks will creak and the brakes will warp. I bought my 210lbs 6"2" son a $400 Ironhorse 5.5. So far I've replaced the front fork (Tora 318), wheels (XT 756/Mavic 317/DT), cranks (FireX), brakes/levers (BB7/Speed7), shifters and deraillieurs (LX/XT). Now he can ride on a 20 mile single track without things breaking. IMHO, entry level and Clyde are not a good match. Oh, yea, the chain was a piece of junk too.
This is the general consensus on Clydes and entry level bikes, and from my own experiences. It's tough being a big guy on a budget, since entry level bikes tend to use flimsy part specs to meet their price targets, and we chew through parts like mad

The biggest points any clyde looking to get into riding should consider is
Wheelset, Cranks/Bottom bracket, & brakes. They're some of the most expensive upgrades in aftermarket parts.

The closest 'entry level' bike I recommend for an abusive clyde is the Kona Hoss. Kona did some homework when they were putting that bike together, and it's still a great bargain.

When you're monster, looking for the cheapest way to get into the sport is a false economy, because you will spend more in repairs, and less time on the bike while it's broken
 

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Probably not

zarr said:
Are there any bikes out there under $800 for Clydes?
Unless, of course, you buy used, or can find a shop with a clyde-worthy bike that's a leftover. Chances of that are slim to none. Set your budgetary sights on a grand and find a Hoss.

Bob
 

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zarr said:
Are there any bikes out there under $800 for Clydes?
Yep, but they're DJ bikes, not XC bikes. $8-900 is pretty much the starting point for a XC bike which is clyde-ready unless you feel like spending mondo cash on new parts right quick (Wheels and cranks especially)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
thecrazyfinn said:
Yep, but they're DJ bikes, not XC bikes. $8-900 is pretty much the starting point for a XC bike which is clyde-ready unless you feel like spending mondo cash on new parts right quick (Wheels and cranks especially)
I was thinking DJ stuff too. The main reason I started this thread is because folks give folks answers about entry level bike choices here on the forum, and often times don't ask about the persons' weight.(I've done it before too), thinking the person can change the fork (mainly, even though there are other considerations also as you guys say). Well, I put the cheaper than a grand question out there because I wanted to hear if there is indeed some low priced bikes out there that are ready equipped for Clydes. i've seen a couple of DJ/Hoss type bikes closed out (at jensonusa.com for example), but very rarely do I see that. It is a sad fact that Clydes have to pay a bit more to get started in mountain biking (which is a good way to lose weight so you maybe could get away with getting a lighter, cheaper bike! But I guess that's just the way it 'tis. Personally I build my own bikes, and believe it or not, I save money doing it! It's just a matter of studying and constantly checking for sales and being in the right place at the right time. But everyone is not mechanically inclined or patient enough to build their own. To me it's as much a challenge as riding the trails.Well, more or less. :thumbsup: ...---zarr :)
 

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zarr said:
I was thinking DJ stuff too. The main reason I started this thread is because folks give folks answers about entry level bike choices here on the forum, and often times don't ask about the persons' weight.(I've done it before too), thinking the person can change the fork (mainly, even though there are other considerations also as you guys say). Well, I put the cheaper than a grand question out there because I wanted to hear if there is indeed some low priced bikes out there that are ready equipped for Clydes. i've seen a couple of DJ/Hoss type bikes closed out (at jensonusa.com for example), but very rarely do I see that. It is a sad fact that Clydes have to pay a bit more to get started in mountain biking (which is a good way to lose weight so you maybe could get away with getting a lighter, cheaper bike! But I guess that's just the way it 'tis. Personally I build my own bikes, and believe it or not, I save money doing it! It's just a matter of studying and constantly checking for sales and being in the right place at the right time. But everyone is not mechanically inclined or patient enough to build their own. To me it's as much a challenge as riding the trails.Well, more or less. :thumbsup: ...---zarr :)
For a Clyde, the equation is somewhat different than for lighter riders. Generally you save money by buying a bike ready to go, but except for DJ bikes or the Hoss, most bikes simply aren't built with tough enough components, so a custom build will be cheaper than buying and swapping higher-value components like wheels or cranks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
thecrazyfinn said:
For a Clyde, the equation is somewhat different than for lighter riders. Generally you save money by buying a bike ready to go, but except for DJ bikes or the Hoss, most bikes simply aren't built with tough enough components, so a custom build will be cheaper than buying and swapping higher-value components like wheels or cranks.
Well said, crazyfinn. :thumbsup: If I haven't mentioned it yet, I'm a Clyde too. I have built some pretty strong bikes that cost somewhere hovering around the price of entry level bikes! :eek: ...(somewhere around, anyway). As of this thread, my answer to newbie Clydes is this: If you want a low price bike, get up off your big fat *>s and get ta buildin!! :D (.. just joking of course. :) But do learn bikes and get your tools ready for some fun! You can do it!! ---zarr :)
 

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entry level clyde bikes

My LBS has a Haro V2 leftover for about half the price of the 2008 model Flightline 2 which is what the V2 was replaced with. Anybody out there have any comments about Haro Bikes.
 

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my 08 cobia is holding up well to my abuse.

I wanted a hoss but had difficulty tracking one down and besides I wanted to try the 29er route. It's working well so far. Next build will probably be a surly karate monkey or a kona hoss.
 
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