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Can't find any solid research backed data or good real world anecdotal evidence on this matter. I'm riding at a DH bike park like place now all the time. And it is steep, fast, awesome fast berms, medium to large jumps with a Pro Jump line (has HUGE jumps) that would make people from Whistler do a double take if they saw it! Half the trails you have to either walk up a steep hill to the top or take a shuttle on certain days. And the other half of the trails you have to walk or ride up, no shuttle. So ventilation and light weight are a HUGE part of this decision.

And I know I should get a full face helmet when riding there. I don't want to find out what can happen to your face or head if you're not wearing one and crash here. But I'm really just finding so much conflicting info on what type of helmet I should go with, and the elements are making this decision really hard as well. If it was cooler all the time, then I'd just get a DH helmet.

But I'm in the Midwest, and it's HOT and humid in the summer and fall. Typical day would be 90* or hotter with very high humidity and not much breeze. Even without a helmet on, your head is sweating! But... these trails are steep and dangerous if you don't know what you're doing and none of them are "beginner" trails. They are all low end Black or higher. And I want to protect my face and head well. A few people have already had some horrific crashes and some people have been Helicoptered out! So I'm getting a Full Face helmet for sure. Just not sure what kind.

I was thinking I'd just get a Smith Mainline/TLD Stage/Fox ProFrame, Leatt 4.0 V21, etc Enduro helmet. Something that has LOTS of ventilation, is lighter, and yet still has a DH crash rating. But as I do more research on this, I see about 50% of people saying to just get a full on DH helmet, and the other half saying no, you're good with an Enduro helmet or you'll die of heat and no ventilation.

I also will be taking 1-2 trips to Ski resort bike parks a year for MTB vacations. And obviously those trails will be steep, fast and have huge jumps as well, they'll just be much longer and have way more elevation then where I normally ride.

So can anyone say for sure if I'd be better with a full on DH helmet, or should I just get a good Enduro full face that is DH rated? I really don't want to get a helmet that's going to be heavy, crazy hot, with little to no ventilation if it's not necessary. I can't find ANY info that is data driven that states that any of these newer Enduro/DH helmets like I listed WON'T protect your head and face well on a steep DH trail crash, that's fast, and has large jumps. Only people's broscience or opinions. Looking for actual data or people that have real life anecdotal evidence of a serious crash using one of these newer Enduro/DH type helmets. Did it work well in a major crash? Are the DH type helmets going to be too hot with too little ventilation to warrant the possible extra safety they MIGHT provide?

Thanks
 

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Both are rated to DH standards. Actual DH helmets likely far exceed the standard. However, nobody is really going to publish any actual data on that. I have the IXS Trigger "enduro" FF helmet as well as their Xult downhill helmet. How something feels in your hand is obviously not a scientific test, but it's pretty obvious that the DH helmet is way beefier and ready for larger impacts. My normal rides are gravity trails that I pedal to the top on a boring climbing road for 60-90 minutes. On those, I hang the helmet off my pack instead of wearing it. So the heat difference is negligible and I'll wear the heavier helmet. If I'm pedaling up and down and not taking the helmet off, I'll wear the lighter one. Both have given me no reason to doubt their ability to protect though.



T
 

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Can't find any solid research backed data or good real world anecdotal evidence on this matter. I'm riding at a DH bike park like place now all the time. And it is steep, fast, awesome fast berms, medium to large jumps with a Pro Jump line (has HUGE jumps) that would make people from Whistler do a double take if they saw it! Half the trails you have to either walk up a steep hill to the top or take a shuttle on certain days. And the other half of the trails you have to walk or ride up, no shuttle. So ventilation and light weight are a HUGE part of this decision.

And I know I should get a full face helmet when riding there. I don't want to find out what can happen to your face or head if you're not wearing one and crash here. But I'm really just finding so much conflicting info on what type of helmet I should go with, and the elements are making this decision really hard as well. If it was cooler all the time, then I'd just get a DH helmet.

But I'm in the Midwest, and it's HOT and humid in the summer and fall. Typical day would be 90* or hotter with very high humidity and not much breeze. Even without a helmet on, your head is sweating! But... these trails are steep and dangerous if you don't know what you're doing and none of them are "beginner" trails. They are all low end Black or higher. And I want to protect my face and head well. A few people have already had some horrific crashes and some people have been Helicoptered out! So I'm getting a Full Face helmet for sure. Just not sure what kind.

I was thinking I'd just get a Smith Mainline/TLD Stage/Fox ProFrame, Leatt 4.0 V21, etc Enduro helmet. Something that has LOTS of ventilation, is lighter, and yet still has a DH crash rating. But as I do more research on this, I see about 50% of people saying to just get a full on DH helmet, and the other half saying no, you're good with an Enduro helmet or you'll die of heat and no ventilation.

I also will be taking 1-2 trips to Ski resort bike parks a year for MTB vacations. And obviously those trails will be steep, fast and have huge jumps as well, they'll just be much longer and have way more elevation then where I normally ride.

So can anyone say for sure if I'd be better with a full on DH helmet, or should I just get a good Enduro full face that is DH rated? I really don't want to get a helmet that's going to be heavy, crazy hot, with little to no ventilation if it's not necessary. I can't find ANY info that is data driven that states that any of these newer Enduro/DH helmets like I listed WON'T protect your head and face well on a steep DH trail crash, that's fast, and has large jumps. Only people's broscience or opinions. Looking for actual data or people that have real life anecdotal evidence of a serious crash using one of these newer Enduro/DH type helmets. Did it work well in a major crash? Are the DH type helmets going to be too hot with too little ventilation to warrant the possible extra safety they MIGHT provide?

Thanks
I have worn my O'Neal full face motocross helmet riding regular ol' trails with it probably in the mid to upper 70s, possibly 80. So I don't think you'll die choosing a downhill helmet.
 

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That sort of a thing is nebulous as far as DH vs non-DH.

My two cents is that a helmet that fits well, is comfortable, and doesn't melt your brains is going to be better than a helmet that doesn't, sucks for comfort, or does melt your brains as you will either not wear it or will be distracted by those things when riding and that can lead to problems.

If the answer happens to be a DH full face then it is the way to go and the answer is something like the DBX 4/Gravity then it is the way to go.

I have an older version of this helmet (DBX 4) and it is definitely more substantial than some of the light enduro helmets out there including convertible helmets that I have owned (MET Parachute, DBX 3).

The Gravity/DBX isn't as burly as a full on DH helmet like a TLD D4 but the question you have to answer is does that matter relative to where you ride, fit, comfort, and heat management.

I'm comfortable wearing a full face on all of my rides as it becomes a habit and something like a lightweight or convertible helmet is too much of a compromise somewhere compared to something like the DBX or a full DH helmet for me.

I'm also comfortable entrusting my one and only noggin to Leatt and the DBX style helmet based on these factors.

Some people could argue, and I can see where they would come from, that a full on DH is useful for park days and they don't go full face, just depends on what you value there and how you want to do things.

I think top tier companies for helmets like Leatt, TLD, POC, etc have their stuff dialed in so it comes down to what fits you, if you have a crazy large noggin for sizing, what is available, how much you want to spend, and ventilation.

That last one would vary based on how much hair you have and also sweat management.

The MET for me was not great at sweat management with my bald/shaved head where the Leatt stuff is much better and then using goggles on top of that takes care of sweat coming down in to your eyes but maybe that isn't as big of a deal for someone with lots of hair on their head.
 

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I ride ‘enduro’ ff for bike park, main difference better ventilation, light, and after small impact u replace helmet comparing to full dh

Helmet compatible with neck brace and dh certified;

For me most important besides certified- how comfortable it fit! mips(or analog, breathability since sometimes u pedal uphill

I’m ok to replace it as needed;
Used to have full dh helmet - after ‘enduro’ donated dh to local school

There such thing for skate park and other helmets like multiple small crash sustainability

However will easily ride in dh helmet in case it will fir me better


Cheers
 

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Okay, what bike park is it that you’re talking about? I gotta know.

I don’t think any full-on DH helmet will be ventilated enough to feel cool in the humid Midwest summer. Are you riding the expert/pro lines and hitting the big features? Do you ride at your limit a lot of the time? If not, then maybe the enduro helmets would be adequate?
 

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I started a thread on here a few months ago (July I think) about full face helmets. Many people put comments on there and recommended lots of different brands of helmet. It may help you or offer some useful advice!

I ordered a Bell Super DH helmet which was really comfortable to wear. It had a removable chin bar as well which would help you with high temperatures. Definitely worth checking this helmet out!

Good luck with your research though and let us know what you buy!
 

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Is anyone a fan of having the front piece removable? I wouldn't want something breaking off after hitting the ground.
What is wrong with that? I’m huge fan of those enduro helmets like bell super dh, met etc;
Rode morzine, Andorra, Mammoth etc, whistler planned after covid, yep u need to replace them often, however the most comfortable piece or equipment


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I am 90% full face enduro helmet at 10% open face these days.

I love the ventilation of the enduro full face. Most of the time i am not shuttling and do massive 1000mtr climbs/descends.
DH helmet is to hot and heavy for that action. Even when i'm shuttling at the bike park we can do some longer runs with a few pedal sections so i love the enduro for park aswell.
 

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I don't have scientific info or evidence, but I personally wear an enduro helmet (Smith Mainline) which replaced my TLD D3 that was stolen. Here's my take:

I got the Smith because I wanted a lightweight fullface helmet for certain local rides and I needed a full face for the bike park. The Smith seemed to fit the bill with its crash certification...etc. I still wear a half-shell most of the time for those local rides.

Anyways, the main difference I found between the TLD D3 and the Smith Mainline is the D3 almost feels like a descendant of a motorcycle helmet, whereas the Smith feel like they're a big XC helmet. I'm assuming this is the same across the board with different brands.

D3: Heavier, less ventilation, thicker helmet padding and liner, felt more solid.

Mainline: Opposite of what I listed for the D3. It does have cutouts in the foam for glasses if you don't like to wear goggles. The D3 did not.
 

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What is wrong with that? I’m huge fan of those enduro helmets like bell super dh, met etc;
Rode morzine, Andorra, Mammoth etc, whistler planned after covid, yep u need to replace them often, however the most comfortable piece or equipment


Cheers
I just feel safer with a motocross-style helmet that is not meant to be removed. If it is removable it means it could also break away under enough force and my face still hitting both the pieces of the helmet that is shattering and the ground. If I was just riding trails with some downhill sections then I'd probably wear one of those helmets. But if I were at a real downhill park then I'd probably just bear it with my motocross full face.
 

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I just feel safer with a motocross-style helmet that is not meant to be removed. If it is removable it means it could also break away under enough force and my face still hitting both the pieces of the helmet that is shattering and the ground. If I was just riding trails with some downhill sections then I'd probably wear one of those helmets. But if I were at a real downhill park then I'd probably just bear it with my motocross full face.
What do u mean removable? It has just more vents, some of those have removable chinbar, however there plenty non;

Also it does not matter, since helmets should absorb the impact, so mips, and other things that deforms during the crash absorbs impacts;

It is like cars, the more they deform at the designated places the more safety they are, since kinetic energy being absorbed by designated material, rather your body/head


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What do u mean removable? It has just more vents, some of those have removable chinbar, however there plenty non;

Also it does not matter, since helmets should absorb the impact, so mips, and other things that deforms during the crash absorbs impacts;

It is like cars, the more they deform at the designated places the more safety they are, since kinetic energy being absorbed by designated material, rather your body/head


Cheers
Sorry, I thought we were talking about the type of helmets that have the full face part removable so that you can use it as open face or full.
 
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