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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been riding long distances and entering endurance races for a few years now. It seems that for most of this time my body weight would hover around 177 lbs ( I am 6'1"). After big events or prolonged periods of training it would not be uncommon for me to drop to 173. Diet is pretty good, I use a recovery drink and generally take good care of myself.

In the last year or so I have paid more attention to being recovered and not entering every race that comes along after a couple of seasons of starting strong and becoming more and more fatiuged as the summer progressed.

This year I did the Cape Epic, and aftewards took 12 days of complete rest. When I started riding again I felt really good, and the little bit of racing I have done since then has gone well. All in all I feel like I am riding well, but now I seem to be about 182-184 pounds. What gives? Diet is pretty much the same, training load is as high, if not higher, sleep is good, etc. I did turn 40 this year, could it be a slowing of my metabolism?

If anyone has some thoughts or insight into this topic I would appreciate your response. At the moment I am tapering to the BC Bike Race, and know it isn't wise to try and lose a bunch of weight, but my current bloated state is stressing me out.
 

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TRAIL KUBUKI CORNDOGGER
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I too had mysterious weight gain after a couple of racing seasons (up from 170 to almost 185). I got tired of feeling my gut smack my legs as well as struggling on climbs I used to breeze up. So I did Weight Watchers on-line - which is based on a points system. I did this at the same time as I was transitioning from base to build phases. The hardest part was fitting the big ride/big calorie days into the allowed points. I managed to get to my goal of 172 where I've been hovering and staying on the Weight Watchers maintenance points. So far so good.

In hindsight I think the weight gain was from a combination of excess snacking (e.g., 2 PopTarts instead of just one), excess big-ride fueling (e.g., 350-400 calories per hour rather than 250-300 now) and changes to my metabolism in the past few years as I've crept into my late 40s.

I don't think I'd recommend a weight loss plan during tapering. It'd be too much of a constitutional change. I'd wait until after the race to take a hard look at your diet, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the advice, although I am not sure I am ready for weight watchers. The thing is I don't really look any different, and I certainly do not have a problem with my gut smacking my thighs while riding. And by all accounts I am riding faster than ever, no problems climbing that I can see.

As I type this I am thinking,"then what's the problem?". Might be that I just need to have a beer and continue on........
 

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cornfish said:
...As I type this I am thinking,"then what's the problem?". Might be that I just need to have a beer and continue on........
HA!....same thing for me.....went from 165 to 177....i'm not slower (well, that much)......i gots base miles and miles and miles......i do like beer, but that hasn't changed....the only thing different is i'm 100% SS this season.....and started off XC with endurance racing later in the season...

interested in other responses..

And Reed, good luck again at the BC race :thumbsup: ....couldn't make it this year....but i'll be back....
 

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Topeak-Ergon Racing
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1) Don't try to lose weight before a race...it will likely deplete you of your glycogen stores if you are not careful and backfire and cause fatigue and decreased performance during the race.

2) Sounds like you've only gained about 5 lb? And, by your perceived increased performance, it also doesn't sound like a bad thing. You probably put on some lean body mass (a good thing) and are hydrated (also a good thing). If you are eating well, you are eating a decent amount of carbs to keep glycogen stores up...and glycogen holds water. So, some of your additional pounds could be water weight, but that is not really a bad thing, especially when going into a race.

3) Keep track of your calories in and calories out, generally speaking. And, keep an eye on your performance and how you feel. If you aren't gaining body fat then I wouldn't worry too much about it right now.

My advice is to focus on BC Bike Race now and you can look at tweaking your calories afterwards, if you really want to. Good luck at the race!

Namrita (posting under Eddie O)
 

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Exactly 1/2 of 2-Epic
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cornfish said:
If anyone has some thoughts or insight into this topic I would appreciate your response. At the moment I am tapering to the BC Bike Race, and know it isn't wise to try and lose a bunch of weight, but my current bloated state is stressing me out.
Turning 40? That's when things get really good! Not to fear man.

Get a scale with %bodyfat. They may have changed in the past few years...but I have a Tanita that works consistently - which is not to say accurately - but short term fluctuations in bf are a reflection of hydration status. After races, particularly if I eat junk on a long drive, I'll be bloated and the bf readings drop a ton. This also coincides with a weight gain (water) of up to 10 lbs.

It sounds like you are getting stronger and not putting on bad weight...but you did use the term "bloated" hence the water weight thoughts...in addition to the other suggestions. Bloating can be minimized by avoiding the simple carb junk stuff we all eat so much of on enduros.

Have a great time in BC like I know you will!
 

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My weight seems to be all over the map. I've seen swings from 175lbs up to 188lbs in a matter of two days just due to salt/glycogen/hydration levels.

There are theories out there that your metabolism can become addicted to excercise. Especially in people who have lost a lot of weight or people who are cutting extreme calories. Or maybe in the case of high milage stage race where you're constantly in caloroe deficit??? It's when your body shuts down it's base metabolism and goes into survival mode. Then... when you finally cut back on your excercise, it can take weeks for your base metabolism to re- adjust, and hence the weight gain.
 

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cornfish said:
Thanks for the advice, although I am not sure I am ready for weight watchers. The thing is I don't really look any different, and I certainly do not have a problem with my gut smacking my thighs while riding. And by all accounts I am riding faster than ever, no problems climbing that I can see.

As I type this I am thinking,"then what's the problem?". Might be that I just need to have a beer and continue on........
This might be a stupid question, but are you getting this measurement on multiple scales? I know that scales can vary a lot, and I suppose it's possible that something went "wrong" with a scale.

It's also possible that you were racing under your "ideal" weight for a long time. I.e. you were sacrificing power for weight loss.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for all of the responses. Hairball, I will look into a bf scale, sounds like it could be helpful. Bloated might have been an exageration but it got me paying attention to my sodium intake. A small adjustment has already made a difference.

Namrita, good advice, and good points. I am certainly not trying to drop weight right now as I am pretty focused on being prepared for BC. I agree that after the race I should adjust my diet a bit. Looking back over the last few months it seems that the weight gain happened during my recovery phase.

Chum, How are things buddy? Glad to hear you are enjoying the single speed and continuing your cycling ways. No matter what I weigh, I am always up for having a beer with you! Thanks for the inspiration.

MightySchmoePong, I have confirmed my weight on other scales and everything seems consistent. I think your theory about being under my ideal weight could be right on the money. I certainly have had a lot of races in the past where I faded seriously, and that seems to be much less of an issue at my current weight. I am a little larger than a "typical" cyclist and I think too much of my energy has been placed on trying to be at a perceived correct weight. Damn my heavy bones!

Thanks for everyone's comments. I got exactly what I needed, good advice, and some peace of mind that I am not completely falling apart.
 

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I have gained weight since I returned from an injury. I done road and MTB racing then I had a botched knee surgery, got a staph infection. I'm 6' 3" and while training I weight 195. During my 5 month lay off I got to as low as 182 pounds. due to the staph infection. I slowly gained my weight back and once I started riding again I gained even more pounds. This was due to me thinking I will burn it off while riding. My training load is lower than normal at this time, since the knee is still recovering. I'm going to be 39 in August, I have come to realize that I can't just keep eating junk and think it's OK I will burn the junk calories. I'm at 208 now and decided enough is enough. Time to eat better food.
 

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I sometimes gain up to 4 pounds! after a tough race a day or two after the event. It is virtually impossible to eat this much. So it must be fluid retention.
Normal stress hormones like cortisol causes fluid retention. Adrenalin causes the kidneys to excrete less urine. This is all in the body's anticipation of a "fight" situation (Say for instance blood loss)
There can also be tissue oedema (swelling in the muscles) due to small tears in the muscle fibres, hypoxia and lactate. The capilleries can also "leak" fluid into the tissues. Combine this with your higher fluid intake (ofter hypotonic) and you gain weight.
The situation fixes itself after a few days. You pass all the urine again. Back to normal.

If you are over 40 and you eat and train exactly the same as last year, you will gain a pound a year(and every year to come) due to the slowing metabolism.
 
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