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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So are these 2 the same thing? I mean the word Enduro is an abbreviation of Endurance, but I see both these terms used to describe different things.

Endurance events, i.e. 12/24 hour races

Enduro events, i.e. timed stages

Thing is I have also seen 12/24 hour events called 'enduro' events and timed stage events called 'endurance' events, I am confused!!

I am interested in getting into racing timed stage events, i.e. a number of stages over an entire day/weekend etc. Would this be referred to as an Enduro?

Also what is the general consensus on the best kind of bike to use for this kind of event? I mean Specialized have a bike called the Enduro, so do I therefore assume that a 6.5 inch travel "all mountain" bike is the best kind of bike for tackling stage based racing?

I realize that different people will have different opinions on this but I want to factor this into my next choice of bike. Could I race Enduro on an xc bike? or would the courses be to technical (rough, downhilly) for me to get up any speed.

Thanks Guys, sorry for the confusing wording! Long day in the office!!!

Ben
 

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Fat-tired Roadie
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The words mean different things in Europe and the US. That's part of the problem. In Europe, Enduro on a mountain bike is the same as Enduro on a motorcycle. I believe it's a longish race with check points that have to be hit in a certain order at certain times, with more points for riders coming closer to those goal times. They're possible goal times, on fairly technical courses. I think it's like par on a golf course - a good rider could beat them. What we call Enduro or Endurance, they call Marathon. We sometimes use that word too.

There's also mountain bike stage racing. It takes a few different forms. The one I'm most familiar with is the BC Bike Race - it's a seven day event, but they're all on XC trails. (Granted, the British Columbia version of XC...) There's also MTB racing in which riders compete in DH, Super-D and XC. I've read about XC stage races incorporating MTB time trials, traditional XC and short-course - that format is fairly equivalent to a road stage race.

In general, if there's no net elevation change or at least not a significant net elevation loss, you'll spend more time climbing than descending. So if you want to be competitive, it makes sense to emphasize climbing fast over descending fast - a matter of saving minutes vs. seconds. People sometimes choose a mellower-riding bike for multiday events than they'd choose for single-day XC in the hope that they'll be fresher for following days.

Within Specialized's line, I think that the Stumpjumper or Epic would probably be a more effective choice. Santa Cruz was talking up the Blur LT for the XC/Super-D/DH one bike events, so that's another example. I wonder if Specialized was thinking about motorcycles when they named the Enduro... Or you can just stick with whatever you ride to race XC. If you don't already race XC, you might consider going to a couple of those before you commit to a multiday event, although if your stages are going to be over three hours right off the bat, it may not be that relevant.
 

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from wiki:
Marathon - Marathon (XCM) is perhaps the toughest form of mountain biking because riders often have to cover more than 80 km in one race on mountainous terrain. The distances usually vary from 60 km to 100 km. Races often exceed 100 km, but are then termed Ultra-Marathons. Recently UCI has inaugurated the Marathon World Cup. Basically it equals point-to-point (PP) discipline and that means that riders have a mass start from point "A" and they finish at point "B".

Enduro - Enduro (ND) is a relatively new format which appears to have taken some inspiration from both car rally and motorbike enduro racing. Mountain bike enduro is essentially the competitive side of the mountain biking format often referred to today as "All-Mountain". It is a stage-race format where the winner is the rider who accumulates the lowest combined time from the various timed sections. Mountain bike enduro competitions typically take place over the course of 1 or 2 days, however, week-long enduro competitions do also exist. A typical one-day enduro race consists of 3 to 5 timed "special" stages which take place on technically demanding, generally descending terrain. These special stages are linked by predominantly ascending "liaison" stages. Although a rider's specific performance on the physically demanding liaison stages does not affect his or her result, the liaisons are often associated with a time-cut off (i.e. a latest permitted arrival at the summit of the next special stage). Due to this eclectic combination of attributes, enduro racing is increasingly recognised as the truest test of the all-round mountain biker.

Stage Races - Stage Races consist of several races - 'stages' - ridden consecutively, usually over a period of several days. A stage is usually similar in length and structure to a Marathon mountain bike race. The competitor with the lowest cumulative time to complete all the stages is declared the overall, or General Classification (GC), winner. Stage races may also have other classifications and awards, such as individual stage winners.

or what AndrwSwitch said ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hey, Thanks so much guys!! Both amazing answers to my question!! So I guess basically there are a plethora of events under various names to cover all sorts of disciplines and riding styles!

I will for sure go and check out some more xc races and try to speak to people in person too, I have been riding for about 10 years but I only ever rode for fitness and fun before, and mostly DH/FR.

Looks like I need to go to some of these events and see what other people are riding too.

All very confusing though isn't it!! What would the Megavalanche be classified as? Super-D?

Cheers guys!
 

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Fat-tired Roadie
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"Other." ;)

The classifications get a lot less useful outside of UCI-sanctioned events. They're not really designed to be broad classifications such that any competitive mountain bike event can be grouped into one. The purpose is more so that people know that certain events are roughly comparable to each other in terms of skills and training required to do well.

If your background is DH/FR, why not compete that way? Downhill races are frequently a multiple day affair, because of practice and qualifying and whatnot, and sometimes including multiple disciplines, like traditional DH, 2X or 4X, and Super-D. If you decide to switch disciplines, you're going to get owned for a while by guys with half your bike handling skill, until your fitness catches up to doing something really different. I love racing XC and I'm thinking about doing a couple endurance events myself this season, but XC and Endurance are very different from DH. Get yourself a XC or trail bike and start messing around, but compete in your favorite discipline.
 
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